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Today's date is Sunday, November 29, 2020
School of Social Sciences
 May 2019
Thursday 09
16:00 - SEMINAR - Archaeology Seminar Series : Was Music the Language of The Missing Link? The role of Musicality as an evolved component of human culture More Information
Over the last forty years or so, speculation about the origins and purpose of music within the disciplines devoted to human evolution has moved from being almost systematically ignored to centre stage. This paper sets out some of the historical influences on this change in the value placed on Music, as well as proposing why the topic is significant. It presents and evaluates the trajectories of complementary theories for the role and universality of Music from Darwin and his immediate predecessors, and reviews new contributions to the debate that are appearing with increasing frequency in literatures as diverse as: pre-natal learning; acoustic archaeology; geriatric medicine; cognitive development; social intelligence; and hemispherical integration.

In conclusion, the paper will illustrate the possibility that music, rather than being a luxury that emerged as a side-benefit of language, may have played a part in the development of symbolic thinking, religious ritual, and theory of mind at an early stage in modern human cultural development.
Friday 10
8:40 - CONFERENCE - Conference on Radicalisation, Counter-radicalisation and De-radicalisation Website | More Information
Radicalisation, Counter-Radicalisation and De-Radicalisation



For nearly two decades since 9/11, policymakers and the academia alike have paid much attention to radicalisation and terrorism involving jihadist groups and Muslim actors. Despite costly military interventions and an array of counter measures and policies, transnational jihadism and its inspired acts of terrorism have not diminished, transpiring in the rise and fall of ISIS with new challenges, including the issue of foreign fighters and their families. The recent Christchurch terrorist attacks (March 2019) further have shown that radicalisation is not simply limited to groups and individuals basing themselves in jihadism and Islam. They add to the list of threats from multiple forms of extremism that exist in our societies. Overall, the situation calls for more comprehensive and evidence-based policy responses to address radicalisation and find ways towards de-radicalisation.

This one-day conference aims to explore:

Radicalisation, its causes, its various manifestations, and how different spaces enabled by globalisation have spread radicalisation

The experience of other countries in responding to radicalisation

The responses by Australian government and community to radicalisation

Emerging issues of responding to returning foreign fighters and their families exposed to terrorism in the wake of the fall of ISIS

The symposium therefore aims focuses on both research and policy in the areas of radicalisation, counter-radicalisation and de-radicalisation.



Co-hosted by

Centre for Muslim States and Societies, University of Western Australia

Public Policy Institute, University of Western Australia

Australian Institute of International Affairs WA

SPEAKERS

Keynote address, Professor Stephen Smith, Advisory Board Chair of UWA Public Policy Institute

Dr Hass Dellal AO, Preventing violent extremism, Executive Director and Company Secretary, Australian Multicultural Foundation

Professor Shamit Saggar, Evidence about Islamist inspired radicalisation, Director, Public Policy Institute, University of Western Australia

Professor Raymond Taras, Xenophobia and Islamophobia: what has changed since Runnymede 1997?, The Australian National University, Canberra

Professor Michele Grossman, Radicalisation and counter-radicalisation: post-Christchurch attacks, Deakin University

Dr Mark Briskey, The rise of right wing extremism, Murdoch University

Ms Shameema Kolia, Muslim youth response to Christchurch attacks, Community Relations Manager at MAA International

Ms Rizwana Begum, Pluralism as Counter-Radicalization strategy: the education of Singapore Muslims

Professor Samina Yasmeen, Returnees and dealing with children and women exposed to terrorism and radicalisation in Syria, The University of Western Australia

Dr Azim Zahir, Salafism, radicalisation and foreign fighters: lessons from the Maldives, Associate Lecturer, University of Western Australia

Mr Muhammad Suleiman, Countering radicalisation: African experiences, PhD Candidate, University of Western Australia

Conveners

Professor Samina Yasmeen, Director, Centre for Muslim States and Societies, University of Western Australia

Dr Azim Zahir, Associate Lecturer, University of Western Australia



Tickets: Tickets via Eventbrite. Prices include morning tea, lunch and afternoon tea (Vegetarian and non-veg options would be available. For dietary requirements please email to [email protected] with the subject line "dietary restrictions")



For more information: Dr Azim Zahir, Associate Lecturer, School of Social Sciences, University of Western Australia

M: 0417800303; E: [email protected]

11:00 - SEMINAR - Linguistics Seminar Series : Yours, mine and ours? Trirelational kin terms in a language under pressure More Information
Trirelational kin terms are lexemes that identify a family member (the referent) via triangulation, by simultaneously specifying their relationship to two other parties: the speaker and propositus (person from whose perspective the relationship is calculated—often the addressee) (Laughren, 1982; McConvell, 1982; Merlan, 1989; O’Grady & Mooney, 1973). Modern descriptions of Australian languages often concede that trirelational terms are no longer actively used, or indeed even remembered (Dalton et al., 1995, p. 93; Meakins & Nordlinger, 2014, p. 166). Logically, as these systems fell out of usage they must have passed through intermediate stages, however brief, in which subsets of speakers still controlled subsets of terms—or, intriguingly, subsets of the meanings that these terms once encoded. To my knowledge, however, the progress of this shift has never been directly observed. This paper provides just such an observation.

Mudburra (Ngumpin-Yapa, Pama-Nyungan) is a highly endangered language of Australia’s central Northern Territory. While modern Mudburra speakers no longer use any trirelational terms as such, these lexemes and their meanings are not entirely lost; in fact, they seem to be contracting in a very systematic fashion. Data from eight speakers of varying fluencies show that trirelational terms are evolving into simple terms through erosion of the speaker-propositus and speaker-referent relationships, with the propositus-referent relationship maintained. Furthermore, data from one elderly speaker reveals an intriguing intermediate stage: as in traditional usage, he insists that these terms must involve three parties—but unlike traditional usage, he only specifies the propositus-referent relation (allowing the other two to be of any sort). This step-by-step contraction suggests that, of the three relationships that trirelational terms index, propositus-referent is most salient. Furthermore, it provides yet more evidence that language change is structured, even in situations of extreme pressure and shift.
Thursday 16
16:00 - EVENT - Archaeology Seminar Series : Murujuga Petroglyphs – Rock Art Narratives More Information
Murujuga, Burrup Peninsula, comprises one of the world’s greatest petroglyphs assemblages. Spanning many tens of thousands of years, displaying a myriad of styles and subjects; this rock art provides many stories. Correspondingly, the discipline of rock art research has a number of paradigms and ways of interpreting. One of the advantages Australia has over many other rock art provinces is the existence of people directly linked to the art, it is a living tradition. This, sometimes, can add a complication to research but in the main it adds a rich and insightful way of viewing rock art. There are other ways of getting at the story than through the Aboriginal informed process. Description of what we see, the formal recording and analysis of objects has proved to be useful in archaeology. Ways of looking, ways of identifying and ways of interpreting are interwoven with the rock art of Murujuga. This seminar explores just some of the intertwining of these narratives, revealing patterns in understanding the petroglyphs and the sacred landscape of Murujuga.
Friday 17
11:00 - SEMINAR - Asian Studies Semiar Series : Understanding academic cheating in senior secondary schools in Indonesia and its possible relation to the country’s corruption problem. More Information
The lively public discourse on academic cheating in Indonesia is focused on the National Examination, which is a standardized test organised for Year-9 and Year-12 students. However, since the focus is too narrow, other behaviours that may actually have developed into a pervasive cheating problem have been overlooked. In 2015 the Indonesian government introduced a new twist to the problem by stating that cheating in the National Exam could be one of the causes of the country’s corruption problem. This thesis looks at patterns of actions and beliefs regarding academic cheating shared by students, teachers, and parents in two senior secondary schools in Indonesia. The findings of this study show that cheating in schools in Indonesia is indeed beyond the scope of the National Exam. The pervasiveness of the problem can be partly explained by looking at the dynamics of the social relationships of the students. As for government’s claim on the cause-and-effect relationship between academic cheating and corruption, opportunism and individual collectivism identified in both schools could become the enabling elements.

14:30 - SEMINAR - Anthropology/Sociology Seminar Series : This week’s seminar consists of an Honours’ completion presentation and an early stage PhD presentation More Information
Transnational Students, Gentrification and Urban Subjectivities: An ethnography of transnational Chinese student residents in Perth, Western Australia.

This paper explores urbanisation processes of gentrification as they intersect with Australia’s international education industry. These concurrent conditions have led to an increase in what I argue to be transnational studentification in Australia’s urban centres. Little research, however has been undertaken to understand the impacts of these patterns of urban transformation on the students themselves. This project examines a case study of transnational middle-class Chinese students living in the City of Perth precinct. Adopting de Certeau’s theory of tactics and Bourdieu’s notion of habitus as analytical frameworks, and employing a walking interview methodology, this project interprets the students’ experiences and perceptions of space and place. I aim to understand and interpret new regimes of subjectivity that emerge through these patterns of socio-spatial transformation in Australia. I outline positions of translocality, temporality, and contested space which govern these students’ interpretation and construction of the city, and of their modes of subjectivity. Ruth is an Honours’ student in Anthropology and Sociology.

Australian Rules football and Aboriginal well-being in Perth, Western Australia.

Sport, and more specifically in this case, Australia’s ‘native’ game of Australian Rules football, has provided important points of reference around which racial and cultural relations in Australia take place. Australian Rules football brings to the fore, and allows us to investigate, the already established boundaries of moral and political communities, whilst allowing for the physical and social expression of those values and a means of reflecting on them. This seminar aims to shine light on the significance of Australian Rules football in the lives of Aboriginal footballers. The seminar will address some of the inequalities experienced by Aboriginal footballers, and explore the potential for the game to contribute to Aboriginal health and well-being. Furthermore, it is hoped that this research will create a greater understanding of Aboriginal identity, well-being and life ways in the unique social context of Australian Rules football. Leighton is a PhD student in Anthropology and Sociology.
Thursday 23
16:00 - SEMINAR - Archaeology Seminar Series : Vessel of Globalization: The Many Worlds of the Edwin Fox, 1853-1905 More Information
The merchant vessel Edwin Fox was exceptional for being unexceptional. It was old fashioned even before its keel was laid down in Thomas Reeves’s shipyards near Calcutta in 1853. It was neither large nor fast, and had none of the prestige of the great tea and opium clippers that captured the public imagination in the mid-nineteenth century. The Edwin Fox was a small, ugly slowpoke in the heyday of the age of sail and a lonesome survivor in the age of steam, and from a mariner’s perspective it sat at the bottom of the hierarchy of opportunities. Yet the life and career of this undistinguished ship coincide with a pivotal era in globalization: the years between 1860 and 1890 that Jurgen Osterhammel calls the “inner focal point” of the 19th century. And the Edwin Fox participated in many of the developments that made these years so crucial: the rapid expansion and intensification of trade around the globe; the spread of industrialization to many regions; the great thrust of Western imperialism; the unprecedentedly large migrations of people, both free and forced; the large-scale and systematic dispossession of indigenous peoples and their replacement with settler populations; the integration of settler colonies into imperial markets; and environmental change on a massive scale. Beginning with the November 20, 1858 arrival of the vessel at Fremantle, Western Australia carrying 82 passengers and 280 convicts, this talk will combine archival research and Arc GIS mapping to reconstruct the many worlds of the Edwin Fox. Emphasizing stories of integration, interactions, and entanglements, this paper describes the ways in which the unique perspective of this single ship can provide to a more intimate understanding of the human agencies and the human costs involved in the most important period of globalization to occur prior to the one we have been experiencing since the 1990s.

Friday 24
14:30 - SEMINAR - Anthropology & Sociology Seminar Series : Magali McDuffie – ‘"Jimbinkaboo Yimardoowarra Marninil" - Listening to Nyikina women's voices, from the inside to the outside: Nyikina women's agency in an inter-generational journey of cultural and environmental actions, economic, and self-determination initiatives on Nyikina Country, through film’ More Information
Twelve years of collaboration between three Yimardoowarra Marninil, Nyikina sisters from the Lower Fitzroy River, and French-Australian filmmaker and PhD Scholar, Magali McDuffie, have revealed the Nyikina women’s determination to speak and re-affirm their Nyikina worldview into existence. Their voices, and those of other Kimberley Aboriginal people, demonstrate the strength and continuity of the women’s discourse, despite ever-changing government policies and strategies.

In her PhD thesis, Magali deconstructs the historical and historiographical discourses, anthropological data, legislative policies, development theory, as well as international Indigenous and non-Indigenous literature on agency and development as they relate to the Kimberley region of Western Australia. She investigates the impacts of the colonial state’s development project from colonisation onwards, and describe the Nyikina sisters’ complex interactions with the dominant discourse, bringing to the fore the Nyikina worldview. In privileging Nyikina voices, through film, her study reveals the often hidden flaws of an exclusively market-oriented capitalist economy.

Nyikina women’s voices have become a significant part of a global Indigenous discourse on development alternatives. Their continued agency on the local, national, and international stage, demonstrates the significance of booroo , Country, as a decolonising ground in the context of global development.

In her presentation, Magali will retrace the journey of her PhD thesis, using both film and chapter excerpts to illustrate her findings.

17:30 - PUBLIC TALK - Growing up African in Australia : AfREC Africa Day 2019 public panel discussion and book launch More Information
The theme is “Growing up African in Australia” and will feature an interactive panel discussion and Q&A followed by refreshments and networking. The event also serves as the WA launch of the recently published book by Black Inc. Books Growing up African in Australia. Copies will be available to buy on the night. The event is held in partnership with Black Inc. Books, the UWA African Students Union and the Organisation of African Communities in WA (OAC). We would also like to highlight OAC’s Africa Day 2019 Gala Dinner on 25 May. We hope to see you at both events!
Thursday 30
12:00 - SEMINAR - Archaeology Seminar Series : The Reverend Smithies’ Native Schools: experiences of Noongar children in residential schools of the Swan River Colony, 1840-1855 More Information
The Reverend John Smithies arrived in the Swan River Colony in July 1840, and immediately established a residential mission to Noongar children in the centre of Perth. In 1845 the mission moved to Wanneroo, then in 1851 moved again, to York. By 1854 the mission at York housed only two children, and in 1855 was closed by the government, having ‘failed’. Many other church, government, and private institutions were also operating during the period of Smithies’ missions, and a number of Noongar children were moved between these institutions, both around the South West and across the country. Very little is currently known about the identities and life experiences of the Noongar people who were institutionalised in Smithies’ missions, the circumstances that led them there, or their lives after institutionalisation. This research seeks to discover what stories can be told about Noongar people who were associated with Smithies’ missions from the results of historical and archaeological investigation. As well as extensive historical and ethno-historical archival research into the written record relating to these missions, this project aims to survey and excavate at the two former Smithies mission sites still accessible to archaeological investigation; Wanneroo and York. It is hoped this research will contribute to a better understanding of these early missions, and the lives of the people associated with them.

 June 2019
Thursday 06
9:00 - WORKSHOP - Assessment Essentials : A workshop for academics and postgraduate students Website | More Information
The objective of this two day workshop is to enhance the skills of the faculty and postgraduate students in the assessment of student learning. The topics covered include; Writing test items, creating assignments, conducting pre and post examination reviews, assessment of professionalism, feedback and development of blueprints. This workshop is organised by Peers Learning Together: A Community of Practice for academics with an interest in assessment and feedback funded by the Educational Enhancement Unit at the University of Western Australia
Thursday 27
8:00 - WORKSHOP - UWA Korean Studies : Professional Training Workshop More Information
Professional development certificate provided by the School of Social Sciences, the University of Western Australia.

Features presentations by leading academics from UWA, UNSW, Monash University and ANU, as well as presenters from NSW DoE, WA and ACT school.

Registration and participation is FREE.

Refreshments, lunch and workshop dinner set at the University Club included in the registration.

Why sign up?

A two-day workshop designed to provide you with a solid overview of Korean society, culture, history, politics, popular culture and Australia-Korea relations. All presentation materials have been designed to address the ‘Asia priority’ curriculum, and will be free for you to take and use in your own teaching practice in classroom.

Q&A session on funding and further curriculum development opportunities.

Workshop dinner hosted at the Lawrence Wilson Art Gallery, featuring Korean cuisine and a traditional music performance by Jocelyn Clark and Choi Jinsook.

Register through the following link: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSfD_kY51EUDdiY7O2xrIvaYT18laKCLu8eje1x06Bk3Gc19Jg/viewform

Click on the following link to view the detailed program and speakers: https://drive.google.com/file/d/1oL0wSax9tJ0qm9yn07sHjJSXI4UC7tH_/view

For information regarding the venues and parking, please click on the following link: https://drive.google.com/file/d/1tAp8XvZ31MHcQa2aaXyrLBkFRhaa71Cx/view

Times are different on both days, please click the above detailed program link for the time details.

 July 2019
Tuesday 23
11:00 - SEMINAR - UWA Centre for Muslim States and Societies (CMSS) Seminar : 'The Rise of Islamism in the Maldives' More Information
This presentation examines the spectacular emergence of Islamism in the twenty-first century in the island nation of the Maldives, where Islam has existed for about 800 years. It problematizes the conventional view that political Islam is the other of the modern state or an outcome of an aberrant understanding of Islam. As counterintuitive as it is, the chapter argues that the genealogy of Islamism goes back to the institutional and discursive politicisation of Islam through modern nation building since 1930s by state actors with Islamic modernist orientations. Those nation building projects transformed Islam into a modern religion in two primary ways. First, instead of jettisoning Islam from the polity, Islam was institutionalised into modern institutional forms – constitutions, codified laws and rules, centralised state authority, a bureaucratised judicial system. Second, Islam was also transformed into an extra-institutional public political discourse of collective national identity. Both forms of statist political Islam in many ways conformed to the liberal expectations and sensibilities consistent with Islamic modernist orientations. However, instead of weakening Islam in the polity, it was deeply embedded in the political domain. The paper shows that Islamism in the twenty-first century was unwittinglynourished by those forms of political Islam in the polity, as Islamism finds the right ‘language’ already in the political domain. While Islamism agrees with the modalities of the forms of political Islam that emerged through modern nation building, it deeply contests the content, as it were, of them. Oppositional Islamism wants more substantive institutionalisation of Islam and more substantive religious identity for the people, threatening even the liberal aspects of statist political Islam.
Thursday 25
13:30 - FORUM - The UWA Institute of Agriculture Industry Forum : Finding Common Ground: Bringing food, fibre and ethics to the same table Website | More Information
With increasing public scrutiny of agricultural practices in food and fibre production, rebuilding trust between innovative primary producers and ethically informed consumers is becoming more important than ever before. Join us for a lively discussion on finding common ground and moving forward together.

The event program is as follows: 1.30pm Registration and refreshments, 2.00pm Event start, 5.00pm - 6.30pm Sundowner

For more details, view the flyer: https://www.ioa.uwa.edu.au/publications/industry-forum
Friday 26
14:30 - SEMINAR - Anthropology & Sociology Seminar Series : The Thermal Complex: Air conditioning Urban Asia in an era of Climate Change More Information
As cities across the world endure increase extremes of heat, indoor comfort has become a key vector in the debate about sustainability and energy consumption. Across Asia the carbon footprint of buildings continues to rise because of the widespread adoption of air conditioning. Current trends are unsustainable, and alternative, less energy intensive comfort regimes need to be maintained or cultivated.

This presentation examines such challenges as a thermal complex, an approach that seeks to move the debate beyond questions of engineering and smart-city solutions. In this informal presentation we want to outline our struggle at conceptualising a book, and the challenges of imparting socio-cultural histories and political analyses into a domain dominated by techno-scientific discourses.

Jiat Hwee Chang is Associate Professor at the School of Design and Environment, National University of Singapore, and is author of a number of books, including A Genealogy of Tropical Architecture: Colonial Networks, Nature and Technoscience. He is also co-founder of Southeast Asia Architecture Research Collaborative (SEAARC).

Tim Winter is ARC Professorial Future Fellow in the School of Sciences, UWA and was Lead CI on 2 international research collaborations on air conditioning and urban development in Southeast Asia (ARC DP) and the Middle East (QNRF).

 August 2019
Friday 02
11:00 - SEMINAR - The Clash of Ideologies – How? Making sense of the Christianity-related protests in contemporary China : This talk about decoding the State-religion contention in contemporary China will be followed by a seminar in the afternoon hosted by the Anthropology and Sociology group More Information
This talk aims to offer an analytical framework to make sense of the abundant empirical materials regarding the Christianity related protests in contemporary China. It argues that the inherent ambiguity in the Chinese Communist Party’s (CCP) religious policy is fundamentally responsible for the many Christianity-related protests in contemporary China. However, while many Christianity-related protests in contemporary China are closely associated with the clash of ideologies, the specific causes of protests differ significantly among Catholic churches, Protestant churches, and Christian-inspired groups. The ideological incompatibility between the ruling CCP and the Catholic Church in China is epitomised by their struggle for authority and influence over the Chinese Catholic community. On the contrary, some influential Protestant church leaders have turned their progressive theology into social activism since the turn of the 21st century, leading to various forms of protests against the authoritarian policies and politics in contemporary China. In addition, ideological and theological conflicts between different religions or religious schools may also trigger the CCP’s suppression of certain religious groups and activities, which often in turn cause protests.

Dr Yu Tao teaches and researches contemporary China at the University of Western Australia. A political sociologist by training, he conducts theoretical and empirical analysis into the intersections and interactions among religious groups, civic organisations and local state agencies in contemporary China and overseas Chinese communities.

14:30 - SEMINAR - Anthropology and Sociology Seminar Series : Why do Chinese cadres worry about religion? Findings from a list experiment More Information
The Chinese Communist Party (CCP) is often portrayed in the West as hostile towards religion, and the Party indeed still prohibits its members from joining any religion. How should we understand the apparent incompatibility between the CCP and religion? Is the CCP hostile towards religion because of the atheist ideology of a Communist Party? Or is the CCP, as an ‘organisational emperor’, is concerned with the strong organisational capacity that religious groups have in mobilising contentious politics? Moreover, if we were to study this topic through direct interviews, could we believe what Chinese cadres tell us in the first place? In this work-in-progress presentation, we will report findings revealed by a simple, yet sophisticatedly designed, list experience with 170 junior CCP cadres in Beijing. Our result demonstrates that the problem of social desirability exists in some, but not all, dimensions of the perceptions that Chinese cadres have on religion. We also revealed that Chinese cadres tend to perceive different religions with different levels of concerns, while in general they have much stronger concern over the frequency of religious congregation (i.e. the organisational aspect of religion) than over individual religious participations (i.e. the ideological aspect of religion).

15:00 - SEMINAR - The Formation of Grass-roots Heritage Movements In Iran More Information
In this presentation, I examine the activities of a group of heritage enthusiasts in Iran. Grass-roots heritage activism is a relatively recent phenomenon that appeared in Iran since the late 1990s. Activists often operate collectively, as NGOs that focus on heritage. They represent a range of cultural and socioeconomic origins with different political views. However, they share a certain ambivalence towards and critical approach to official, state definitions of heritage and identity. By referring to data collected through fieldwork I argue that these activities constitute a form of heritage movement and outline some of the characteristics of this movement.

Ali Mozaffari is a Fellow of the Australian Research Council with the Alfred Deakin Institute at Deakin University. Through his research, he seeks to understand the uses of the past in contemporary discourses of heritage and built environment in Iran and West Asia. His publications include Forming National Identity in Iran: The Idea of Homeland Derived from Ancient Persian and Islamic Imaginations of Place (2014) and World Heritage in Iran: Perspectives on Pasargadae (2016), and “Picturing Pasargadae: Visual Representation and the Ambiguities of Heritage in Iran” (Iranian Studies, 2017).
Tuesday 06
13:00 - SEMINAR - Political Science and International Relations Seminar Series 2019 : Title:Environmental Populism: The Politics of Survival in the Anthropocene More Information
Populism is popular but generally gets a bad press—for good reasons. But could populism actually be a progressive force in domestic and even international politics? Recent movements such as Occupy Wall Street and the abortive Arab Spring suggest it might. This presentation previews my forthcoming book and considers—more in hope than expectation—whether a populist upsurge could actually mobilise around the issue of climate change. We will undoubtedly be forced to respond to climate change eventually, but thoughtful, constructive responses may no longer be possible by the time we do. Yet public pressure to make policymakers act in environmentally sustainable ways is still just about possible. Progressive forms of populism, especially in democratic states, could compel even the most conservative politicians to take climate change seriously before it is too late. As Mrs Thatcher might have said, as far as the majority of us who have no influence over policy are concerned, there really is no alternative. This presentation is based on Mark’s new book of the same name.


13:00 - SEMINAR - Asian Studies Semiar Series : Being Japanese, Indigenous Australian, and 'mixed' in Broome More Information
This conversational presentation will consider both the process and the implications of intermittent research conducted by Associate Professor Yamanouchi since 2009 in the vibrant, northern, coastal town of Broome, in Western Australia's Kimberley region. Via a focus on emphases such as a Japanese diaspora, identity, history, ethnicity, food, place‐naming and making, the complex extent to which Indigenous Australians and persons with Japanese heritage identify and interact in Broome, will be explored, alongside an interest in theories of contemporary identity.

Dr Yuriko Yamanouchi is an Associate Professor at the Tokyo University of Foreign Studies (TUFS). She finished PhD (Anthropology) at the University of Sydney. She has been visiting Broome and conducting research with Indigenous people who share a Japanese heritage since 2009. Dr Yamanouchi lectures in Oceania Studies Course at TUFS (The Tokyo University of Foreign Studies).

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