UWA Logo What's On at UWA
   UWA HomeProspective Students  | Current Students  | Staff  | Alumni  | Visitors  | About  |     Search UWA    for      
 

What's On at UWA

* Login to add events... *
Today's date is Friday, November 27, 2020
School of Social Sciences
 April 2014
Wednesday 30
16:00 - SEMINAR - 'School of Social Sciences Event Series - Professor David Trigger : Indigeneity, identity and representation in north Australia’s Gulf Country (co authors: Richard Martin, Philip Mead) More Information
The Aboriginal author Alexis Wright’s novels Plains of Promise (1997), Carpentaria (2006) and The Swan Book (2013) have prompted scholars and critics towards enthusiastic comparisons with the ground breaking work of a range of international writers. With her novels all set partly in the remote Gulf Country of north Australia, Wright’s genre arises from intellectual and political commitment to Indigenous people, and aspires to the idea of a distinctive ‘Aboriginal sovereignty of the mind’. Much less known, yet we argue of complementary significance, are a broader suite of writings about this region, and we address representations of cultural identity and connections to place by authors with both Aboriginal and European ancestries. With our interest in a deliberately cross-disciplinary methodology, ethnographic research complements our focus on texts, to facilitate analysis of diverse identities in a setting produced through both the resilience of Indigenous cultural traditions and the legacies of European settler colonialism. We argue that the range of authorial representations arising from this sector of Australian society provides a focus for understanding shared and contested postcolonial imaginaries about place, culture and identity.

David Trigger is Professor of Anthropology and Head of School of Social Science at The University of Queensland. His research interests encompass the different meanings attributed to land and nature across diverse sectors of society. His research on Australian society includes projects focused on a comparison of pro-development, environmentalist and Aboriginal perspectives on land and nature. In Australian Aboriginal Studies, Professor Trigger has carried out more than 35 years of anthropological study on Indigenous systems of land tenure, including applied research on resource development negotiations and native title. He is the author of more than 60 major applied research reports and has acted as an expert witness in multiple native title claims and associated criminal matters involving Aboriginal customary law. Professor Trigger is the author of Whitefella comin': Aboriginal responses to colonialism in northern Australia (Cambridge University Press) and a wide range of scholarly articles. His most recent book is a co-edited cross-disciplinary collection titled: Disputed territories: land, culture and identity in settler societies (Hong Kong University Press). See: https://www.socialscience.uq.edu.au/david-trigger

17:00 - LECTURE - Public Lecture by Dr Khalid Zaheer: Women's Rights and Duties in Islam : This CMSS lecture explores the topic of women's rights in Islam Website | More Information
Dr Khalid Zaheer is the Scholar at Understanding Islam UK (UIUK) since May 2012. UIUK is a non-political organization established in UK as a registered charity since 2001 for spreading a non-sectarian, peace-promoting, and moderate message of Islam based on the two authentic sources of Qur'an and Sunnah. Prior to joining UIUK, he was the Dean of the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences of University of Central Punjab from July, 2009 to May 2012. Prior to joining UCP, he was the Director Education, Al-Mawrid, which is an NGO established to promote research and education on Islam. Prior to joining Al-Mawrid in September 2006, he was an Associate Professor of Islamic Studies and Ethics at Lahore University of Management Sciences (LUMS). He has a teaching experience of more than 20 years. Before joining LUMS, he taught at IBA, University of the Punjab for 12 years as a permanent faculty member. He has also taught at various other educational institutions in Lahore. Dr Zaheer's PhD dissertation was a critique on Interest-Free Banking. His areas of interest are Islamic Banking, in particular its departures from true Islamic principles, and application of Islamic teachings in the contemporary business and social environment. He regularly contributes articles to the monthly Renaissance, a leading religious English journal of the country. Dr. Zaheer has appeared in many television programs and has also given sermons at mosques, both in Pakistan as well as in the UK. His understanding of Islamic teachings and his experiences have convinced him that our present-day world is confronted with scourges of two extremisms: religious extremism and liberal extremism. He has joined UIUK to realize his dream to promote the cause of the true Islamic message, which is neither extremist nor liberal.

 May 2014
Thursday 01
17:00 - LECTURE - Public Lecture by Dr Khalid Zaheer: Interfaith Dialogue in the Contemporary World : This CMSS lecture explores the merits and promotion of interfaith dialogue today. Website | More Information
Dr Khalid Zaheer is the Scholar at Understanding Islam UK (UIUK) since May 2012. UIUK is a non-political organization established in UK as a registered charity since 2001 for spreading a non-sectarian, peace-promoting, and moderate message of Islam based on the two authentic sources of Qur'an and Sunnah. Prior to joining UIUK, he was the Dean of the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences of University of Central Punjab from July, 2009 to May 2012. Prior to joining UCP, he was the Director Education, Al-Mawrid, which is an NGO established to promote research and education on Islam. Prior to joining Al-Mawrid in September 2006, he was an Associate Professor of Islamic Studies and Ethics at Lahore University of Management Sciences (LUMS). He has a teaching experience of more than 20 years. Before joining LUMS, he taught at IBA, University of the Punjab for 12 years as a permanent faculty member. He has also taught at various other educational institutions in Lahore. Dr Zaheer's PhD dissertation was a critique on Interest-Free Banking. His areas of interest are Islamic Banking, in particular its departures from true Islamic principles, and application of Islamic teachings in the contemporary business and social environment. He regularly contributes articles to the monthly Renaissance, a leading religious English journal of the country. Dr. Zaheer has appeared in many television programs and has also given sermons at mosques, both in Pakistan as well as in the UK. His understanding of Islamic teachings and his experiences have convinced him that our present-day world is confronted with scourges of two extremisms: religious extremism and liberal extremism. He has joined UIUK to realize his dream to promote the cause of the true Islamic message, which is neither extremist nor liberal.
Friday 02
18:00 - EXHIBITION OPENING - p a n o r a m a + Transcending Borders + Worldwide Backyard Website | More Information
Winthrop Professor Ted Snell, Director of the UWA Cultural Precinct, invites you to the opening of three new exhibitions: p a n o r a m a + Transcending Borders + Worldwide Backyard at the Lawrence Wilson Art Gallery.

Visit the gallery website for more information on the event and upcoming exhibitions. RSVP to the opening via email to [email protected] or by telephone to (08) 6488 3707.

Thursday 08
16:00 - SEMINAR - Desert Rock Art: A Tale of Two Continents - Winthrop Professor Jo McDonald : Archaeology Seminar Series 2014 More Information
Occupation of the Australian arid zone started soon after 50,000 years ago. Since this time, hunter-gatherers across this driest continent on earth have demonstrated all of the modern-human hallmarks: resilience and aesthetics. People’s movement into an ecologically diverse continent and the development of social networks through both time and radical environmental change, is recorded by diverse and early regional rock art production systems supported by a range of other archaeological signatures. Work with colleagues has resulted in a model for changing rock art production over time in the Western Desert of Australia (McDonald and Veth 2013, McDonald et al. 2014).

Understanding the peopling of the Americas is currently undergoing a paradigm shift. Until recently the unshakeable idea endured that around 12,000 years ago a small hardy band of Clovis-wielding big-game hunters crossed the Bering. Now both genetics and archaeological finds demonstrate that humans were using the unglaciated landscapes of North America during the Last Glacial Maximum. Dates from Mexico and South America suggest that this could have occurred as early as 30,000 years ago. Models for North American rock art have been tempered by the Clovis-First paradigm, and most Great Basin rock art models see this as an Early Holocene phenomenon. In this seminar I make some preliminary observations about hunter-gatherer responses to landscape and rock art in the Great Basin through time, and propose a model for how rock art might be perceived in terms of broader models of human occupation and settlement systems though time. The movement of people into the arid zone and their use of rock art as an information strategy are discussed as global phenomena.
Friday 09
13:30 - SEMINAR - Typhoon: Climate, history and society in The Philippines - Professor James Warren, Murdoch University : Asian Studies Seminar Series More Information
Typhoons have been largely ignored in Philippine historiography until quite recently. Cyclonic storms have helped shape the character —physically, economically, socially and culturally— of particular areas in the Philippines, especially the northern and southern extremities of Luzon, the Visayas, and large stretches of the eastern seaboard of the Philippine island world. But typhoons have not affected all people and all areas of the archipelago in the same manner. Piers Blaike and his colleagues argue, in At Risk: Natural Hazards, People’s Vulnerability and Disasters, that patterns of morbidity and mortality and property damage from such storms, and the capacity of people to recover and reconstruct their livelihoods, reveal differences based upon their history, regional wealth and socio-political organisation.

While individual calamities have found a place in some studies of cities, colonies and nations in Southeast Asia, few scholars have considered cyclonic storms important agents of change, or explored in detail the cultural-ecological impacts and perception and meaning of the typhoon in daily life. For the past five centuries, nature’s powerful tropical child—the typhoon—has continued to embark annually upon its unpredictable, unreliable and unstoppable Pacific journey, heading in the direction of the Philippines.

What recent extreme 21st century typhoons have reaffirmed is the capacity of one of nature’s most fearsome phenomena to lay bare the social inequalities of contemporary Philippine society, particularly the extent to which elite prosperity has been founded on peasant deprivation and, more recently, capitalist institutions. Despite the centuries separating them, the typhoons mentioned in this paper share remarkable continuities. They have repeatedly destroyed the livelihoods and homes of families and communities and inflicted disproportionate harm on the poor and those invariably lacking a bundle of entitlements. While long-term recovery from typhoon disasters has generally been slow, necessarily affected by the vitality of the economy-nationally and locally-and whether there has been a sustained humanitarian response to the crises, the social strains on rural Filipino communities and their capacity to recover has proved far more difficult in recent times, because of the recurrent scale and intensity of the cyclonic storms, and continued local and foreign control over resources.

This paper explores aspects of the impacts of the typhoon on Philippine society and history over the course of five centuries, with particular reference to population increase, agricultural, economic and political developments, and the influence of natural and social environments on the future of the nation.
Friday 16
11:00 - SEMINAR - Tourism and Theatre: performing and consuming Indigeneity in an Australian Wildlife Sanctuary : Anthropology/Sociology Seminar Series More Information
The article explores the social and cultural production of Indigeneity in a wildlife sanctuary on the Australian Gold Coast. We note that the human and animal characters that form the displays of the sanctuary work toward the assemblage of a largely consistent underlying theme. The latter reproduces commensurability between two main figures associated with Australian settler history, namely the country's pre-colonial indigenous species of animals and plants and the human Aboriginal population. We argue that the theatre produced in the park's highly sanitized visitor contact zone has wider social and political ramifications for Australian society and modern society in general. By ceremonially re-enacting through a tourist enterprise the historical myth of separation between modern civilization and primordial indigeneity, the sanctuary produces ambivalent meanings about the relation between 'nativeness' in nature and society. Our analysis addresses the simultaneous emancipation of contemporary human indigeneity as a revitalised cultural value together with the social distancing of Aboriginal people as one dimensional caricatures of primordial nature.
Saturday 17
10:00 - PUBLIC LECTURE - Excavating the Future: Archaeology and Technology : UWA Archaeology Department celebrates National Archaeology Week on 17 May Website | More Information
The UWA Archaeology Department invites you to join us to celebrate National Archaeology Week on Saturday, 17 May.

What do archaeologists actually do? How do archaeologists use cutting-edge technology in their research? What kind of archaeological research goes on at UWA? How can you even become an archaeologist yourself?!

Come along to a relaxed day of short talks, a picnic/fieldwork lunch and lab tours, where you’ll find out the answers to all these questions and more.

Our speakers will cover topics including: An Introduction to Australian Archaeology; Archaeology and Graffiti; Just what is Geoarchaeology?; The Australian Historic Shipwrecks Protection Project; Desert Rock Art: Dating the Dreamtime; Caesar and GIS.

The morning of talks will be followed by a picnic lunch organised by the Archaeology Society of Western Australia (at a small charge) and optional tours of our archaeology lab facilities here at UWA.
Tuesday 20
13:00 - PUBLIC LECTURE - India-Pakistan Relations: An Overview : CMSS Presents: A Public Lecture by Dr. Sanu Kainikara Website | More Information
Ever since the birth of Pakistan and India as independent nations after the partition of the Indian sub-continent in 1947, Indo-Pak relations have been vexed to say the least. The nations have fought three accepted wars; two unacknowledged wars; and is still in the throes of insurgency and counter-insurgency operations. The divergent socio-political direction that the nations have taken in the post-independence age have vitiated their bilateral relationship.

This presentation provides a brief background to the relationship between the two nations; examines the fundamental reasons for the animosity that prevails most of the time in the official relationship of the two nations; and analyses the current situation. It will also pay particular attention to the ‘Kashmir Issue’ and consider the impact of the result of the on-going Indian elections.

Dr Sanu Kainikara is the Air Power Strategist at the Air Power Development Centre of the Royal Australian Air Force and also a Visiting Fellow at the University of New South Wales. He is the author of 11 books: Papers on Air Power, Pathways to Victory, Red Air: Politics in Russian Air Power, Australian Security in the Asian Century, A Fresh Look at Air Power Doctrine, Seven Perennial Challenges to Air Forces, The Art of Air Power: Sun Tzu Revisited, At the Critical Juncture, Essays on Air Power, The Bolt From the Blue, and From Indus to Independence Volume I. He has presented extensively in international forums and published numerous papers on national security, strategy and air power. He is the recipient of the RAAF Chief of Air Force’s Commendation.

Dr Kainikara is a former fighter pilot of the Indian Air Force who retired as a Group Captain after 21 years of commissioned service. During his service career, he has flown over 4,000 hours on a number of modern fighter aircraft, commanded an operational fighter squadron and held various other command and staff appointments. He is a Qualified Flying Instructor, and a graduate and instructor of the IAF Fighter Weapons School, the National Defence Academy, the Defence Services Staff College, and the College of Air Warfare. He is a recipient of the IAF Chief of Air Staff Commendation and the Air Force Cross.

After retirement from active service, he worked for four years as the senior analyst, specialising in air power strategy for a US Training Team in the Middle East. Prior to his current appointment he was the Director Wargaming and Strategic Doctrine in the Strategy Group of the Department of Defence. He has also taught Aerospace Engineering at the Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology University, Melbourne. He has two Bachelors degrees, a Masters degree in Defence and Strategic Studies from the University of Madras and his PhD in International Politics was awarded by the University of Adelaide.
Thursday 22
16:00 - SEMINAR - Anarchaeology of Graffiti - Sven Ouzman, UWA : Archaeology Seminar Series 2014 More Information
Is Archaeology a tool – or even pathology – of European colonisation? Does it have liberatory potential? Can there be an archaeology of today and of tomorrow?

Increasingly, archaeologists are becoming aware of the discipline’s history and the need to de-colonise much of its theory and praxis. One strategy is to work with and even to incorporate Indigenous understandings of the past. Another move is studying ‘contemporary archaeology’ to reverse the gaze so that it is less ‘us’ studying ‘them’ than ‘us’ studying ‘us’. But such a move can be indulgent; so we need to examine what is at stake in studying ‘contemporary pasts’. Archaeological analysis of battlefields, prisons, homelessness, and garbage disposal have proved insightful in bringing marginalised people and pasts to the fore. In this spirit I use archaeological and rock art techniques to examine graffiti. Superficially understood as a modern language of the poor and peripheral; archaeological analysis shows graffiti to continue an ancient tradition of politically-engaged place-marking and making. I illustrate this point using case studies from southern Africa and Western Australia. I conclude by considering the definition and legal status of graffiti, heritage management implications, and the ethics of contemporary archaeology studies.
Friday 23
11:00 - SEMINAR - ‘Belonging’ in the land down-under: insights from three methodologies - Professor Farida Fozdar Professor/Future Fellow Anthropology and Sociology : Anthropology Seminar Series 2014 More Information
This seminar is a trial run for paper to be presented at the International Sociological Association conference in July. The paper considers differences in articulations of belonging in Australia generated using three different methodologies among different populations. Results from face to face interviews plus a photovoice exercise among refugees settler are compared and contrasted with data generated in 20 focus groups with migrants and non-migrants across Australia using a set of images designed to elicit discussion around national, transnational and postnational identities. Membership Categorisation Analysis is used to interrogate the presumptions included in the prompts used to generate the data (interview questions, themes for photographs, and images for focus group discussion) and the results. The range of parameters of belonging from the political (civic and ethno belonging) to the interpersonal (family, friends, place) are noted, as well as the limits to belonging, particularly the category work done discursively to identify insiders and outsiders. The paper concludes that each method is useful in different ways to gain access to different experiences of belonging and unbelonging.
Thursday 29
16:00 - SEMINAR - Virtual diving: analysis of the archaeological value in image-based three-dimensional digital reconstructions of underwater shipwreck sites in Western Australia : Archaeology Seminar Series 2014 More Information
This study proposes to contribute to techniques and methods for recording underwater archaeological sites by testing and refining a methodology for accurate and affordable image-based 3D modelling of shipwrecks in Western Australia (WA). Ultimately, providing a detailed, accurate and informative digital representation of a site for archaeological interpretation and dissemination of information to peers and public. Until recently, acquiring photographs of an underwater site and processing them into a 3D reconstruction was time consuming and required specialist skills. Advances in algorithms for computer science and machine vision now allow raw images to be quickly processed and 3D reconstructions automatically derived. Both legacy data (data previously collected) and new data (collected during this research) will form the basis for the project. Photographic recording of underwater sites and the application of modern 3D reconstruction software will fulfil essential archaeological requirements of recording a site quickly and accurately, potentially becoming a primary tool for underwater archaeological recording.

18:00 - PRESENTATION - What's Christianity Ever Done for Education? : This WXED talk will trace several pillars of today's Education system that arose from an adventurous Christianity. More Information
It began with chimney sweeps and is now publicly funded universal education. In this and other stories, this WXED talk will trace several pillars of today's Education system that arose from an adventurous Christianity. Is there today a potential for teachers and students in a new ongoing, adventurous and open conversation towards a transformative learning. This event is an experiment in thinking beyond the silos and we are looking for you to join the conversation.
Friday 30
11:00 - SEMINAR - Manwurrk narriwurlhkemen (we have to light bushfires): How White people have come to understand the way Arnhemlanders use fire in the landscape : Anthropology Seminar Series 2014 More Information
In the penultimate chapter of The politics of suffering, Peter Sutton offers some examples of what he considers to be true reconciliation between Aboriginal and White Australians, sharing experiences and entering into the life worlds of each other. His examples are of anthropologists and key informants, ‘Unusual couples’, the title of that chapter.

In this paper I outline a long standing and ever growing project that has involved teams of Aboriginal people and White field workers – rangers, linguists, anthropologists and ecological and physical scientists – which, I argue, extends Sutton’s ‘Unusual couples’, demonstrating reconciliation and cooperative recognition on a much larger scale. The theatre is Arnhemland, Western Arnhemland in particular, and the subject is how we Whitefellas have learnt from, and adapted, Aboriginal technologies without misappropriating them.

This cooperative venture has its origins in the early 1970s when, as a young forestry officer, I found Aboriginal resistance – hardly surprising we can say in retrospect – to the forestry program at Maningrida, initiated in the 1960s to bring wild Arnhemlanders into the modern world, to assimilate them into Australian society. The project, again not surprisingly, failed, for several reasons. Not the least of these was its explicit objective to suppress manwurrk and thus, supposedly, create vast fields of regeneration of native cypress pine.

Yet, all was not lost. Out of that failure came the vast learning experience for Whitefellas, some of which I describe, and another practical project, largely directed and operated by Aboriginal people themselves. That began as a locally oriented conservation and cultural maintenance operation but, in being able to take advantage of carbon farming credits, has now become part of global environmental improvement.

Much of this has been well recorded and analysed in recent years and my purpose here is not so much to rehash already published work as to illuminate the importance of the teams of Blackfellas and Whitefellas working together, thus producing the discourses that come out of common experience; and ‘unusual teams’ that point to the practical reconciliation of which Sutton writes.

12:00 - SEMINAR - Bridging oral and literary modes in recent Indigenous Australian film and television’ : Social Sciences Seminar Series More Information
Reconciliation is “a journey”. The destination is a state of being where “understanding, unity, trust and respect” between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians is the norm (https://www.icv.com.au/). Reaching this state, however, is hampered by many things including the widespread belief among the “broader Australian community,” along with most of the Western World, that oral cultures are inferior to modern cultures of literacy. It is time to remind literary cultures of their debt to an oral past and to find ways to increase respect for Indigenous people and cultures. Perth researchers found that a functioning art gallery for Indigenous art and artists gave rise to informal “ceremony[ies] of elevation” where “respect for Indigenous people and cultures” improved day to day relations (Trudi Cooper, Susanne Bahn and Margaret Giles, Edith Cowan, 2012 https://www.dia.wa.gov.au/Documents/ReportsPublications/Art_centre_report.pdf ).

In this paper I work with a set of case studies, works of Indigenous excellence arising from and circulating in an inter-cultural mediascape. As a group these works are analogous to a functioning gallery of art works but it is details of the works themselves that I take as raw data. The paper begins by applying the work of Stuart Cooke on the Songpoetry of Paddy Roe and Stephen Meucke. Cooke finds in Roe’s poetry techniques that serve Indigenous Australian oral poetics and are recognisable as elements of the ancient rhetoric that underpins western notions of high literature. I give examples of skilful use of these techniques from my audiovisual case studies then go on to examine the works as Fourth Cinema as envisioned by Barry Barclay. In particular I identify ways the film makers speak in to Aboriginal groups even as they speak out to wider audiences. The final section discusses contexts of production where community involvement respects guardianship of stories, places and culture resulting in what Faye Ginsberg calls “embedded aesthetics”, and the use of “immersive aesthetic” that counters or renders impossible the neo-colonial gaze. The paper concludes that the growing number of popular audio-visual works by Indigenous writers and directors provides opportunities for non-Indigenous researchers to initiate small ‘ceremonies of elevation’ both in providing an audience and in offering informed critique of the works.

 June 2014
Tuesday 24
12:00 - SEMINAR - Sarah Knuckey, Columbia University, Law, Drones, and Targeted Killing More Information
Sarah Knuckey (incoming director of the Human Rights Clinic at Columbia University, New York) will speak on “Law, Drones, and Targeted Killing” at 12 noon on Tuesday 24 June, in room 294 in the Old Econ and Commerce Building. All welcome.
Friday 27
18:00 - CONCERT - CMSS Musical Evening: with Salamat Ali Khan : A Musical Evening hosted by the CMSS and PAWA Website | More Information
Salamat Ali Khan is one of the leading exponents of the genres of Ghazal and Thumri. Primarily trained by his father Ustad Sharif Khan at the age of 14, Salamat Ali Khan has been able to carve an independent identity in light classical singing.

He has remained for years a dedicated learner in the company of Great Ghazal Singer Mehdi Hassan Khan and accompanied him a number of times during live international concerts.

In 1971, Salamat Ali Khan had his debut performance on Radio Pakistan Karachi as a Ghazal & Thumri singer. Later on, Khan sahib produced a wide range of his musical albums with his own compositions. Khan sahib with his family are primarily based in America and have performed along with his talented wife during many live concerts on the international arena.

Tickets: $15 Limited tickets are available from www.cmss.uwa.edu.au/events.

 July 2014
Tuesday 22
16:30 - PUBLIC LECTURE - CMSS Public Lecture: Canadian Muslim Youth and Perceptions of Political Participation : A Public Lecture by Katherine Bullock Website | More Information
News media often portray Canadian Muslim youth as alienated from society and prone to radicalisation. This lecture focuses on a more complex reality of alienation and engagement, seen through the lens of perceptions of political participation. Using qualitative interview data from 30 Muslim youth in the Greater Toronto Area and London, Ontario, the findings demonstrate a similar pattern to other Canadian youth with respect to political participation, but surprisingly with very high participation rates in the voluntary sector.

Katherine Bullock is a Lecturer in the Department of Political Science, University of Toronto at Mississauga. She sits on the boards of The Tessellate Institute and the North American Association of Islamic and Muslim Studies. She is also President of Compass Books, dedicated to publishing top-quality books about Islam and Muslims in English. Her teaching focus is political Islam and her research focuses on Muslims in Canada, debates on the veil, and media representations of Islam and Muslims. Originally from Perth, she lives in Oakville, Canada with her husband and children. She embraced Islam in 1994.
Saturday 26
14:00 - TALK - Curator in Conversation Website | More Information
Join in the conversation with exhibition curator Barbara Bynder as she discusses the exhibition Wildflower Dreaming: Shirley Corunna and the Coolbaroo League 1952-1962.

The exhibition presents a snapshot of Shirley’s personal journey, following a move from her home in Three Springs in the Wheatbelt region.

Shirley lived and worked in Perth in the 1950s during which time she attended the Coolbaroo League’s weekly Friday night dances.

Visit the Lawrence Wilson Art Gallery website for more information. This talk is free to attend, however, RSVP is essential.
Tuesday 29
13:20 - EVENT - The UWA Institute of Agriculture 2014 Industry Forum : Potential for Food Production in northern Western Australia Website | More Information
New agriculture is believed to play a crucial role in the regional transformation of northern Western Australia. There is significant potential for Asia-focused food production and industry to diversify northern Australia’s economy, trade and sustainable use of natural resources over the long term; and to benefit Indigenous communities, which have a significant presence in the region. It is timely to engage in a discussion on the feasibility and likely effectiveness of new agricultural development projects in this unique region of Australia, where the challenges are magnified compared to southern Australia.

For catering purposes, please RSVP by 21 July 2014 to [email protected]

Alternative formats: Default | XML


Top of Page
© 2001-2010  The University of Western Australia
Questions? Mail [email protected]