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Today's date is Wednesday, October 21, 2020
School of Population Health
 February 2012
Monday 20
0:00 - EVENT - Immigrant Workers’ Occupational Health Study (IWOHS) : Workplace health and safety among immigrant workers in Australia Website | More Information
Immigrant workers’ Occupational Health Study is a new study that will look at the working conditions of immigrant and Australian-born workers. This first part of the study involves meeting with people from the different migrant communities in Australia to learn about their community and their concerns about occupational health and safety.

 March 2012
Monday 12
14:00 - WORKSHOP - UWA Careers Centre - Case Study Workshop - JPMorgan : Case study workshop for Engineering and Geology Students - Find out more about JPMorgan Website | More Information
JPMorgan Chase has a presence in more than 50 locations worldwide, and offers an exciting variety of career opportunities globally. Candidates interested in a position with our firm should explore the opportunities available at www.jpmorgan.com.au.

Global scale, world class talent, and a commitment to diversity shape a culture of leadership within JPMorgan Chase. Explore opportunities to join our team and deliver exceptional value to our clients.

Bookings essential on CareerHub.
Thursday 22
1:00 - EVENT - The Case for an Apology by the Australian Mental Health Professions to Aboriginal and Islander peoples : Close the Gap Event - Seminar Website | More Information
The Centre for Research Excellence in Aboriginal Health and Wellbeing is hosting a Seminar presented by Professor Alan Rosen, Research Psychiatrist, Centre for Rural & Remote Mental Health, University of Newcastle.

Over many years, psychiatric professionals have dominated the lives of people with mental illnesses. We have been responsible for their forced separation and disconnection from their families; incarceration in remote regions; their being humiliated, stigmatised and sequestered as moral lepers; the loss of their identities as people, denying them their human rights, their dignity and entitlement to full membership as citizens. Mental health professionals have become the officially anointed custodians of people with mental illnesses – “for their own good”. We have inadvertently broken their spirits, disempowered them, alienated them from their kin, and in many instances de-skilled them and depleted community knowledge of how to look after their own. The case for regret and apology for the past suffering of Aboriginal Australians with a mental illness is pressing.

16:30 - EVENT - Health Students Society (HSS) Sundowner Website | More Information
Come down and celebrate week four with a Free BBQ for HSS members (donation for non-members!) We're also looking for some wonderful people to fill some committee roles, voting from 5:15pm!
Monday 26
12:00 - EVENT - LIWA Medical Research Seminar Series : Prof Anna Nowak presents "Thoracic Cancer Medicine" Website | More Information
LIWA invites you to a free seminar on: "Thoracic Cancer Medicine" by Professor Anna Nowak from School of Medicine and Pharmacology, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital. Time: 12 noon for light lunch with 12.30pm – 1.30pm presentation
Tuesday 27
13:00 - SEMINAR - Understanding Karma : In every field of life we enjoy the results of our work, or we suffer the results. This is called Karma Website | More Information
Material nature itself is constituted by three qualities: the mode of goodness, the mode of passion and the mode of ignorance. Above these modes there is eternal time, and by a combination of these modes of nature and under the control and purview of eternal time there are activities, which are called karma. These activities are being carried out from time immemorial, and we are suffering or enjoying the fruits of our activities. For instance, suppose I am a businessman and have worked very hard with intelligence and have amassed a great bank balance. Then I am an enjoyer. But then say I have lost all my money in business; then I am a sufferer. Similarly, in every field of life we enjoy the results of our work, or we suffer the results. This is called karma.

 April 2012
Wednesday 04
10:00 - WORKSHOP - Consumer Training workshop on Basic Research Information Website | More Information
We are pleased to announce that we are running a Consumer Training workshop on Basic Research Information on Wednesday April 4th 10am – 2.30pm at the Telethon Institute of Child Health Research in Roberts Road Subiaco.

If you are currently working with consumers and or community groups, they might be interested in attending this workshop. The event is free and lunch will be provided – please tell us of any special needs.
Wednesday 11
16:00 - SEMINAR - CWR Presents: : Integrated surface water and groundwater modelling to support the Murray Drainage and Water Management Plan, south-west Western Australia Website | More Information
The Murray region in south-west Western Australia is characterised by a high water-table, sandy soils, wetlands of significance, and an extensive agricultural drainage system to relieve water-logging in winter months. Urban growth pressures in the region have led to the requirement of a Drainage and Water Management Plan (DWMP) to guide future water management. A key component of the DWMP involved the development of a regional surface water and groundwater model to determine groundwater levels and flows under various climate, drainage and development scenarios.

The Murray regional model was constructed using the integrated surface water and groundwater model MIKE SHE, and consisted of unsaturated zone, saturated zone, channel flow and overland flow components. It had a constant grid spacing of 200 m, and covered an area of 722 km2. Calibration was from 1985 – 2000 and validation from 2000 – 2009 using 45 groundwater bores and 7 surface water flow gauges. The normalised root mean square error of the calibrated model was 2.02%. Land development, drainage and climate scenarios were simulated and their results are discussed in this paper.

The process of model conceptualisation, construction, calibration and simulation is discussed, and provides an appropriate framework for model evaluation and a high level of confidence in modelling results. The Murray MIKE SHE model provided regional groundwater levels, areas of groundwater inundation, estimated drainage volumes from development areas, effects of sea-level rise, and changes in surface water flows for a variety of climate, drainage and development scenarios. The results were used to determine regional-scale hydrology affects resulting from future urban development.

The model grid size and calibration error may prevent the usage of the model for detailed drainage design; however the model is suitable to act as a basis for developing higher-resolution sub regional and local models that are more appropriate for this type of evaluation. The results of the Murray MIKE SHE modelling exercise were used in the Murray Drainage and Water Management Plan, a key deliverable to the Western Australian Planning Commission, used to guide stakeholders in future urban water management in the Murray region. Keywords: MIKE SHE, integrated modelling, groundwater, urban development, Western Australia

Biography,

Degrees Bachelor of Science (environmental biology), University of Adelaide, SA, 2001 Bachelor of Civil and Environmental Engineering (1st class honours), University of Adelaide, SA, 2003

Joel is an engineer with eight years experience in hydrological, hydrogeological, hydraulic and nutrient modelling. He has experience in applying and calibrating surface water yield and nutrient models including LASCAM, MUSIC and the Source Integrated Modelling System, which have been used to develop various Water Quality Improvement Plans and licensing and allocation tools for the Department of Water.

He has been involved applying the integrated surface and groundwater model MIKE SHE and the hydraulic flood model MIKE Flood to support the Murray and Serpentine Drainage and Water Management Plans. Joel is a member of eWater’s Source technical users group, the Danish Hydrological Institute’s MIKE user council, the NWC national groundwater modelling guidelines technical committee, and the WA Cities as Water Supply Catchment’s modelling group. He has written guidelines for modelling in Western Australian regions of high-water table and sandy soils, and is currently developing guidelines on the application of future climate data to modelling applications in WA.

PS* This seminar is free and open to the public, no RSVP required.

****All Welcome****
Friday 13
9:00 - COURSE - Semiparametric Regression : A Short Course Website | More Information
Semiparametric regression is concerned with the exible incorporation of nonlinear functional relationships in regression analyses. Assuming only a basic familiarity with ordinary regression, this short-course explains the techniques and bene ts of semiparametric regression in a concise and modular fashion. Spline functions, linear mixed models and Bayesian hierarchical models are shown to play an important role in semiparametric regression. There will be a strong emphasis on implementation in R and BUGS.

Registration for the course is available online at https://scg.maths.uwa.edu.au/?id=347
Tuesday 17
13:00 - ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING - UAEM AGM : 2012 AGM for UAEM More Information
Universities Allied for Essential Medicines 2012 AGM Nominations for committee positions open, please email [email protected]

We are the UWA chapter of Universities Allied for Essential Medicines, an organisation that aims to make sure that medicine and medical research that happens in the universities of first world countries is used to meet the needs of people in developing countries. New members from all disciplines welcome.

Website: www.essentialmedicine.org Facebook: UAEM UWA
Wednesday 18
13:20 - Forum - Bioenergy Forum : The Energy and Minerals Institute along with the School of Chemistry and Biochemistry are pleased to invite you to The University of Western Australia’s Bioenergy Forum Website | More Information


Microalgae Energy Farms for Low Cost Biodiesel Production Presented by Dr Peer Schenk

ABSTRACT: From start to finish, biodiesel production from microalgae requires optimisation of all steps towards cost effectiveness and energy efficiency, as current limitations exist mainly in the industrial feasibility of microalgae systems. Our team is developing improved non-GM Australian microalgae strains, as well as low cost algae cultivation and harvesting systems to provide a cost & energy effective biodiesel production module. This module utilises microalgae's potential as zero-waste biorefineries, producing not only bioenergy, but also protein-rich animal feedstock and high-value products such as Omega-3 fatty acids. Our research group maintains a growing collection of marine and freshwater microalgae from Queensland, whereby high lipid yielding strains are screened and selected for improvement. We use adaptive evolution methods incorporating mutagenesis and high throughput selection for high-lipid yielding strains. These are then used in especially engineered "Split-System" cultivation units that incorporate both, a low cost photobioreactor (PBR) coupled with several extensive raceway ponds. In the PBR, optimal culture conditions are maintained with daily culture harvested into the raceway ponds to stimulate lipid biosynthesis. Several harvesting and lipid extraction.

Autotrophic Production of Algal Biofuel: What is the best technology line-up Presented by Dr Skye Thomas-Hall

ABSTRACT: Microalgae have the potential to produce 10-20 times more biofuel feedstock per unit area than any terrestrial bioenergy crop. However for this to be economically viable, three important technology stages need to come together: i) cultivation of high lipid species must be relatively contamination free and highly productive (ideally AFDW in excess of 30 g m-2 d-1); ii) the biomass needs to be harvested quickly using energy efficient technology; and iii) the harvested algae should be processed into stable products before value is lost. Cellana LLC was formed in 2008 with the primary aim of developing the technology pathway to make algal biofuels economically viable. Cellana’s 2.5ha Kona Demonstration Facility (KDF) is located on the Big Island of Hawaii and has been producing high quality algal biomass since 2009. The production can be tailored to customer needs for different fractions of the algal biomass, including lipids for biodiesel, protein for animal feed, essential fatty acids (i.e. EPA, DHA) and accessory pigments (e.g. lutein, ß-carotene, lycopene etc) for the nutrition and cosmetic industries. Cellana’s KDF is primarily a research facility, designed to test many algal species simultaneously (up to 12) in realistic outdoor conditions. The large scale hybrid system can grow 2 species simultaneously and has excellent flexibility that enables cultivation conditions to be optimized for each individual strain. The facility is also set up to test a variety of harvesting and dewatering techniques on each species grown at demonstrations scale (up to 780,000 L). Presented is an overview of strain selection at small scale (lab <1 L) and mid scale (outdoor 200 L). Growth parameters that can be altered for optimizing cultivation at mid scale and large scale (60,000 – 130,000 L). The majority of the presentation is on harvesting and processing techniques used by Cellana and in the wider algae industry, focusing on cost versus efficiency of methods trialed at Cellana’s Kona Demonstration Facility (KDF). Best handling and storage practices are also presented along with data analysis specifically focusing on lipid quality.

16:00 - SEMINAR - CWR Presents: : Building Global Resilience: Recognizing There Is A Next Generation. Website | More Information
This talk is about the importance and suggestions for building global resilience for the benefits of our next generation and us. The content is effectively addressing the four focuses summarized below,



The History of life: 5 Million years of building the DNA inventory

* Responding to the interglacial periodicity: building the world

* The stability through diversity; filling habitats

* Last ice age: tempering our genes

* Warming since last ice age: Switching on aggression



Change in the name of progress, technologies of the 1900's

* Anthropogenic emissions have triggering new carbon emission loops

* Homogenization of habitats is leading to species instabilities

* Globalization is leading to economic chaos & preventing sustainability through wealth inequality

* Drugs, sex and earphones are leading to social, mental and cultural instabilities



The challenge for the 21st Century: The consequences of simplification

* Global warming abatement requires carbon sequestration, not only emission reductions

* Biodiversity needs to be restored to ensure sustainable carbon cycles

* The movement of capital needs to constrained to benefiting productivity.

* Multiculturalism & globalization needs to be slowed to re-establish icon of life  



Moreover, where there is a will there is a way! Ten suggestions for building resilience are given at the end of the talk.

The talk is an opening address given by Prof. Jorg Imberger in the International iesp-Workshop, from which resilience as requirement for sustainable development has been discussed. The workshop is aiming to provide a contribution to tackle the earth crises and was held at Munich, Germany 28-30 March, 2012.

PS* This seminar is free and open to the public, no RSVP required.

****All Welcome****
Thursday 19
11:00 - STAFF EVENT - Staff Mixed Volleyball Social Sport : 5 week competition commencing Apr 19th Thursday lunchtimes at the UWA Recreation Centre Website | More Information
Open to UWA Staff Teams. Teams do not have to be representative of faculties and/or departments. Competition will consist of 30 minute games each week during one of four lunch time slots between 11am and 1pm.
Tuesday 24
10:00 - VISITING SPEAKER - International Visiting Speaker, Professor John Frank Director SCPHRP : Best Practice Guidelines for Monitoring Socioeconomic Inequalities in Health Status: Lessons from Scotland Website | More Information
INTERNATIONAL VISITING SPEAKER

Professor John Frank MD, CCFP, MSc, FRCPC, FCAHS, FFPH

Director of the Scottish Collaboration for Public Health Research and Policy (SCPHRP) in Edinburgh

Tuesday 24 April, 2012 Hosted by the Telethon Institute for Child Health Research

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Best Practice Guidelines for Monitoring Socioeconomic Inequalities in Health Status: Lessons from Scotland 10:00am, Seminar Room

A narrative account of the Scottish Collaboration for Public Health Research and Policy model of knowledge transfer to policies, programs and practice in public health 1:00pm, Bibbulung Room

All welcome, RSVP required Melanie Hansen [email protected]

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Professor John Frank is Director of the Scottish Collaboration for Public Health Research and Policy in Edinburgh, which seeks to develop and robustly test novel public health policies and programs to equitably improve health status in Scotland, through the convening and ongoing support of researcher/research-user consortia. Prof. Frank trained in Medicine and Community Medicine at the University of Toronto, in Family Medicine at McMaster University, and in Epidemiology at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, after serving in Mbeya, Tanzania as a Medical Officer and Instructor of Medical Assistants from 1976 to 1979. He has been Professor (now Professor Emeritus) at the University of Toronto, in the Department of Public Health Sciences (now the Dalla Lana School of Public Health), since 1983. He was the founding Director of Research at the Institute for Work & Health in Toronto from 1991 to 1997. In 2000, Prof. Frank was appointed inaugural Scientific Director of the Canadian Institutes of Health Research - Institute of Population and Public Health and in July 2008, he became Director of the SCPHRP. Prof. Frank also holds a Chair at the University of Edinburgh in Public Health Research and Policy. His broad research and professional interests concern the determinants of population and individual health status, especially the causes, remediation and prevention of socio-economic gradients in health. His scientific publications include 25 books, monographs and book chapters, over 140 peer-reviewed journal articles and 65 other scientific publications. He has been principle or co-investigator for $CDN14 million in direct research grants and has overseen over $50 million in flow-through grants in the last decade.
Saturday 28
8:00 - EVENT - Chronic Lung Disease and Smoking Cessation : Educational seminar day with presentations from respiratory specialists including W.Prof. Phil Thompson, Dr Peter Bremner and international smoking cesstion expert Dr Hayden McRobbie. Website | More Information
For all members of the health care team including physicians, GPs, pharmacists, nurses, physiotherapists and other allied health professionals.
Sunday 29
10:00 - EXPO - Nursing and Health Expo 2012 More Information
Held in venues in capital cities across Australia, the RCNA Nursing and Health Expos draw together professionals, practitioners and health providers to showcase the nursing and health industry as a valued and dynamic profession.

Learn about nursing as a profession, discover professional development opportunities and career paths for nurses and health professionals, see equipment and lifestyle options, get to know the higher educational institutions and meet our nursing and health academic staff!
Monday 30
12:00 - VISITING SPEAKER - LIWA Medical Research Seminar Series : Prof Jose Porcel presents "Pleural Fluid Biomarkers" Website | More Information
LIWA invites you to a free seminar on: "Pleural Fluid Biomarkers" by Professor Jose Porcel from Department of Internal Medicine, Arnau de Vilanova University Hospital, Spain. Time: 12 noon for light lunch with 12.30pm – 1.30pm presentation.

 May 2012
Tuesday 01
13:00 - TALK - UWA Careers Centre - Water Corporation Employer Talk : Water Corporation graduate recruitment presentation Website | More Information
Water Corporation representatives will be on campus to talk about graduate opportunities for all students. (engineering and science highly desired) Please book through https://uwa.careerhub.com.au
Friday 04
9:00 - SEMINAR - Microbiology & Immunology Seminar Series: A Negative Future: The Interaction Between Mechanisms of Virulence and Resistance in Clinically Significant Nosocomial Gram Negatives : PhD proposals More Information
Mr Jarrad Hall will give a talk on "A Negative Future: The Interaction Between Mechanisms of Virulence and Resistance in Clinically Significant Nosocomial Gram Negatives" in the Microbiology & Immunology Seminar room, Friday, 4th May 2012 at 09:00am. In 2011 a novel, emerging rarely encountered carbapenemase (OXA-181) was detected. There has been limited spread of this resistance determinant outside of the sub-continent to date. However, several outbreaks of the parental OXA-48 carbapenemase producing Enterobacteriaceae have occurred in Europe. Through the use of molecular biology the project will examine W.A.'s risk of importing highly resistant nosocomial Gram negative bacteria and the relationship between virulence and resistance in these organisms.

9:25 - SEMINAR - Microbiology & Immunology Seminar Series: Characterisation of a successful triple immunotherapy for the treatment of Mesothelioma. : PhD proposal More Information
Ms Shruti Krishnan will give a talk on "Characterisation of a successful triple immunotherapy for the treatment of Mesothelioma" in the Microbiology & Immunology Seminar room, Friday, 4th May 2012 at 09:25am. Malignant mesothelioma (MM) is a cancer of the pleura and less commonly of the peritoneum, tunica vaginalis and pericardium. One particular obstacle preventing tumour clearance by the immune system is the presence of regulatory T-cells (Tregs). These Tregs are prevalent within murine and human mesotheliomas and their removal results in tumour growth inhibition with the release of anti-tumour effector T cells from immunosuppression. Our work has focused on targeting multiple mechanisms of immune suppression in the AE17 murine model of mesothelioma. Specifically, we targeted the depletion of Tregs, CTLA4 and TGF-beta; using monoclonal antibodies and soluble receptors. We found the triple immunotherapy resulted in tumour clearance in 46% (13/28, from three independent experiments) of the mice treated; with the generation of memory T cells (CD4+CD44+T cells) that prevented tumour re-emergence on rechallenging the cured mice with the original innoculum. Though the triple immunotherapy looks promising with the complete eradication of the established tumours and developing immunological memory; optimization of this approach will likely yield an even better response rate.

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