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Today's date is Saturday, October 31, 2020
School of Population Health
 October 2011
Tuesday 04
13:00 - TALK - EMPLOYER TALK - Department for Child Protection Information Session : Are you studying towards a career in Human Services and want to make a difference? Then come along to the Department of Child Protection Information Session Website | More Information
Are you studying towards a career in Human Services and want to make a difference? Then come along to the Department of Child Protection Information Session and find out more about job opportunities, recruitment processes and what a day in the life of a Child Protection Worker looks like.

All Human Services students are welcome, from first to final year.

16:00 - EVENT - Schools at the Heart of Community? More Information
Reflections from the UK & Australia. This forum is linked to the Rural Schools and Sustainable Communities Symposium 2013. The forum will be followed by light refreshments.
Wednesday 05
12:00 - STUDENT EVENT - Honours and BMedSci in Pathology and Laboratory Medicine : What's the next step in my career More Information
Come along and hear about the exciting opportunities for further study in Pathology and Laboratory Medicine. Supervisors will be presenting outlines of the Honours and BMedSci topics for 2012. A pizza lunch is provided at 12.45pm in the Foyer so you will be able to discuss projects directly with potential supervisors.

16:00 - EXPO - UWA Postgraduate & Honours Expo 2011 Website | More Information
The Postgraduate and Honours Expo showcases a host of opportunities for further study, including honours and postgraduate coursework and research possibilities.

Discover the courses each faculty has to offer, learn about postgraduate scholarships, attend information sessions and talk to staff, honours and postgraduate students.

For more information about the Expo along with details on the presentations being held throughout the evening please go uwa.edu.au/postgradexpo
Wednesday 12
13:00 - VISITING SPEAKER - Challenges of Publishing : A lecture by visiting Raine Prof. Karin Khan UBC More Information
"Challenges of Publishing in an era of Impact Factor and Open Access - a view from the BMJ group"

16:00 - SEMINAR - CWR Presents: : Hope for Humanity: Seeds of planetary transformation Website | More Information
It’s hard to maintain hope for the future of our civilization in the face of the flood of bad news in the media. But without hope, there is no hope.

It has been estimated that over a million organizations worldwide are working to change hearts and minds, create global networks of connection, develop and model alternatives, and take political action. In this seminar, I will give a brief overview of this global groundswell of action that promises to reach a tipping point of planetary transformation within the foreseeable future.

Hearts and minds are being changed by new media, social networking, education and personal transformation. Alternatives are being developed by building community locally and globally, creating alternative forms of settlement, adapting existing towns to climate change and post-peak oil, creating new economic and financial systems, increasing local food production and distribution, promoting new lifestyles, and developing green technologies. Meanwhile, grassroots political action is gaining traction through new approaches to campaigning powered by the web.

Bio,

Malcolm is Author of "The Science of Oneness" A worldview for the twenty-first century, and co-author with Christine Connelly of Hope for Humanity: How understanding and healing trauma could solve the planetary crisis.

****All Welcome****

19:30 - Interactive Panel Discussion - Q&A: Adventures in Mental Health : SPAMH's Inaugural Question and Answer Panel Discussion Website | More Information
Got some Questions? Want some Answers? Come join us in Mental Health Week to pick the brains of our diverse panel of experts at SPAMH's inaugural Q&A event: Adventures In Mental Health. No issue is off-limits! Stalls from 7pm, Q&A from 7.30pm. Light supper provided. Dress code is smart casual. This is a free, public event. Our Panel: Mr. Eddie Bartnik - Mental Health Commissioner of WA; Clinical Professor Paul Skerritt - Consultant Psychiatrist, former President of the AMA (WA); Associate Professor Alex Main - Psychotherapist and Trauma Counsellor, Honorary Fellow of the School of Psychology, Murdoch University; Dr. Jock McLaren - Consultant Psychiatrist, Northern Psychiatric Services, Darwin NT, Author of "Humanizing Madness: Psychiatry and the Cognitive Neurosciences"; Mr. Joe Calleja - CEO of the Richmond Fellowship of WA, former President of the Western Australian Asssociation for Mental Health; Ms. Leonie Ramsay - Mental Health Consumer and Advocate, Member of the National Register of Mental Health Consumer and Carer Representatives.

Register your attendance at https://spamhqanda.eventbrite.com. Places are strictly limited.

If you have a question that you would like to submit a question for panel discussion, send it to [email protected] or contact us via the registration page.
Thursday 13
18:00 - PUBLIC TALK - PUBLIC TALK : Why does Alzheimer’s disease matter and what are we doing about it? More Information
Although there is no cure for Alzheimer’s disease at present, medical research has been improving our understanding of the condition and has been exploring new treatment alternatives. And without medical research, no advance in this area will be possible. In this lecture, Professor David Ames will present recent research findings into the early detection of Alzheimer’s disease and discuss possible future treatments and prevention.
Saturday 15
12:00 - FUNDRAISER - Relay for Life @ UWA : The Cancer Council Relay For Life at UWA is a Guild Volunteering student run event for campus and community Website | More Information
The Cancer Council Relay for Life at UWA is a Guild Volunteering run event. In it's inaugural year in 2010 [email protected] raised over $100,000 for The Cancer Council and we hope to go above and beyond that this year. The event will be held on the 15th and 16th of October. We require as many teams and event volunteers as possible; including cancer survivors and carers for this celebratory and fundraising event. Members of staff, students and community are welcome, but please note that places are limited.
Monday 17
18:00 - PUBLIC LECTURE - 2011 Ian Constable Lecture - Now, free, and perfect? : How to live a long and healthy life in the 21st century Website | More Information
The 2011 Ian Constable Lecture will be given by Professor Ian Frazer FAA, FRS, CEO and Research Director, Translational Research Institute.

Australians born in 2011 can expect to live to see the 22nd century, but how can we ensure that they will enjoy their 90+ years of life? Professor Frazer will examine some of the options open to each of us to ensure a long and healthy life, and propose some practical and some more controversial suggestions about how we might go about looking after our nation’s health.

The annual Ian Constable lecture is presented by the Lion's Eye Institute and the Institute of Advanced Studies to honour the work of Professor Ian Constable, one of the world’s leading ophthalmic surgeons.

Cost: Free, but Tickets essential from the Octagon Theatre Box Office. Tel: (08) 6488 2440
Wednesday 19
12:00 - SYMPOSIUM - Child and Adolescent Health Research Symposium Website | More Information
Researchers and service providers involved in all aspects of child and adolescent health are invited to attend the annual Child and Adolescent Health Research Symposium at Princess Margaret Hospital (WB Macdonald Lecture Theatre) and the Telethon Institute for Child Health Research (Seminar Room). The symposium is being held on Wed. 19th Oct. (12.00pm-6.30pm), Thurs. 20th Oct. (10.00am-5.00pm), Fri. 21st Oct. (9.00am-12.30pm) and features presentations by local and international speakers. There is no registration fee to attend the symposium. The program for the symposium is available at the following link https://pmh.health.wa.gov.au/research_symposium/
Friday 21
9:00 - CONFERENCE - Looking to The Future - Annual PHCRED WA Research Conference : This full-day primary health care research conference highlights local research initiatives. Website | More Information
Those with an interest in primary health care will be 'Looking to the Future' at the University Club of WA on Friday 21st October. This event provides opportunities for learning and networking among primary health care workers, researchers, allied health professionals, general practitioners, nurses and students. The conference is of interest and value to both new and experienced researchers in all fields or primary healthcare.
Monday 31
9:00 - EVENT - Art Under the Microscope : A showcase of the surprising physical beauty of world class pathology diagnostics and research in WA More Information
"Art Under the Microscope" will showcase the surprising physical beauty of world class pathology testing and research in WA and is an opportunity to see the majesty and wonder of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine.

12:00 - VISITING SPEAKER - Lung Institute of WA - Medical Research Seminar Series : Future Directions in Nuclear Medicine and Positron Emission Tomography (PET). Website | More Information
A/Prof Ros Francis is a Nuclear Medicine Physician in the Department of Nuclear Medicine / WA Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Service at Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital and has an academic appointment as Associate Professor of Molecular Imaging, UWA (School of Medicine and Pharmacology). A/Prof Francis has a particular interest in Nuclear Oncology and PET. She has a strong research interest in new tracer development, especially in mesothelioma.

 November 2011
Wednesday 09
16:00 - SEMINAR - CWR Presents: : "Recent developments in Human Rights in Australia" Website | More Information
Australia unlike most other parts of the Western world does not have a national comprehensive Human Rights law. However, there have been some recent developments in case law in Australia, based on a patchwork of Commonwealth and State statutes which indicate that there are at least some protections for internationally recognised fundamental human rights.

The reent decisions of the Hight Court relating to the so called 'Malaysia solution' for processing refugess will be discussed, along with a decision upholding the Victorian Charter of Human Rights. The recent decision of the Federal Court in relation to racial vilification of a group of 'white Aborigines' by the Herald & Weekly Times will be referred to, along with a racial vilification case involving the Sunday Times website yet to be decided, in discussing the limits of freedom of speech.

Bio:

Greg McIntyre is a Barrister appointed Senior Counsel in 2002, an Adjunct Professor of Law at Notre Dame University and Chair of International Commission of Jurists (WA Branch). He was awarded the Australian Human Rights Commission Human Rights Law Award in 2009 for his work related to Indigenous Human Rights. He ran the seminal native title case: Mabo v Queensland and this semester has been teaching a course in Indigenous Peoples and the Law at UWA Law School.



****All Welcome****

Wednesday 16
16:00 - SEMINAR - CWR Presents: : The contribution of soil N2O emissions to the carbon footprint of wheat and biodiesel production in Western Australia Website | More Information
Correctly accounting for soil nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions is necessary when assessing the carbon footprint of agricultural and bioenergy cropping systems. Although soil N2O emissions appear low in relation to N fertiliser inputs [e.g., 1.0% if Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) default factor employed], the high global warming potential of N2O (298 times greater than CO2), and the increasing amount and area to which N fertiliser is applied, means accurate estimates are required when calculating net greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from grain and biodiesel production. We measured soil N2O emissions from a rain-fed, cropped soil in a semi-arid region of the Western Australian grainbelt for three years on a sub-daily basis.

The site included N fertiliser (75–100 kg N ha-1 yr-1) and no N fertiliser plots (‘control’). Emissions were measured using soil chambers connected to a fully automated system that measured N2O using gas chromatography. Daily N2O emissions were low (-1.8–7.3 g N2O-N ha-1 day-1) and culminated in 0.09–0.13 kg N2O-N ha-1 yr-1 from the N fertiliser soil and 0.07–0.09 kg N2O-N ha-1 yr-1 from the control. The proportion of N fertiliser emitted as N2O each year, after correction for the control emission (‘background’), was 0.02–0.07%. The emission factor was up to 50 times lower than the IPCC default value for the application of synthetic fertilisers to land (1.0%).

Incorporating locally measured N2O values greatly decreased the carbon footprint of wheat and biodiesel produced from the Western Australian grainbelt. Greenhouse gas emissions decreased from 487 to 304 kg CO2-equivalents per tonne of wheat using local N2O emissions rather than the international default value. Furthermore, utilising locally measured soil N2O fluxes decreased GHG emissions from the production and combustion of one GJ canola based biodiesel from 63 CO2 to 37 CO2 equivalents; with GHG emissions up to 2.1-times lower than that from the production and combustion of one GJ mineral diesel.

We recommend utilising regionally specific estimates of direct soil N2O emissions, and include estimates of indirect N2O emissions, when assessing GHG emissions from grain and biodiesel production from agricultural soils.

*** LOUISE BARTON1, WAHIDUL BISWAS2, KLAUS BUTTERBACH-BAHL3, RALF KIESE3, DANIEL CARTER4, DANIEL MURPHY1

1School of Earth & Environment, The University of Western Australia, Crawley 6009, Australia 2Centre of Excellence in Cleaner Production, Curtin University, Bentley 6845, Australia 3Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Meteorology & Climate Research, Garmisch-Partenkirchen, Germany 4 Department of Agriculture and Food WA, 3 Baron-Hay Court, South Perth 6151, Australia.

****All Welcome****
Friday 18
9:00 - CONFERENCE - 9th Australasian Biospecimen Network Annual Meeting : Biobanking research community scientific meeting first time in Perth Website | More Information
The Australasian Biospecimen Network Association (https://www.abrn.net/abna.htm), a consortium of Biobanking professionals engaged in the collection, storage and dissemination of human biospecimens for research, is convening its 9th Annual ABNA Conference in Perth on Friday 18th November 2011 at the Perth Convention and Exhibition Centre, Western Australia.

ABNA 2011 is anticipated to attract over 120 specialist Biobanking managers and research professionals from Australia, New Zealand and Singapore and is the only meeting of its kind in Australia. International speakers and local experts will give plenary sessions, with additional speakers being invited following abstract submission. Register to attend via the conference URL.
Saturday 19
8:00 - CONFERENCE - II International Congress of Environmental Medicine Website | More Information
The II International Congress of Environmental Medicine will have its focus towards recognising those there environmental factors which causes diseases to individual beings and that it can be diagnosed, treated and prevented

Join us for our II International Congress of Environmental Medicine – November 19-20 - Sao Paulo – Brazil

Summit your abstract until 23/10
Monday 28
9:00 - - Clinical Epidemiology : Summer School intensive unit Website | More Information
This unit focuses on the application of epidemiologic research principles to questions relating to clinical diagnosis, prognosis and the efficacy of therapeutic interventions.

This five-day unit considers: * design, conduct and analysis of clinical trials * non-experimental study designs in the evaluation of clinical outcomes * systematic reviews and meta-analysis * evaluation of diagnostic tests * economic analysis * ethical issues in clinical research

Within an evidence-based practice framework, emphasis will be placed on the critical appraisal of the scientific research evidence that underpins clinical practice (from primary studies to clinical practice guidelines).

Overall, the course aims to improve the participant's knowledge of clinical research methods and to develop a critical approach to the incorporation of research into clinical care decisions. In addition to formal lectures and 'hands-on' tutorials, the course will promote discussion and debate about clinical research and the sharing of clinical research experiences.

One of the outcomes of the unit will be an increased level of competence in preparing a competitive research grant proposal. As such participants will be required to work within a multidisciplinary research team to develop a (hypothetical) clinical research proposal, from the refinement of the research question, to study design, data collection, statistical analysis, ethical issues and budget.

This five-day unit will consist of a combination of lectures, small-group tutorials, practical demonstrations, discussion and ‘hands-on’ experience in research proposal development.

In preparation for the teaching week, you will be sent pre-reading on 18 November 2011.

Who should attend? Health professionals and health researchers interested in gaining a better understanding of clinical research methods and critical appraisal of the scientific literature related to clinical practice.

Please note: this is a full unit with associated enrolment and fee requirements. Please visit our website for more details.
Wednesday 30
16:00 - SEMINAR - CWR Presents: : Environmental Priorities -Valuing the Priceless Website | More Information
Few species can exist without interacting with others. When one species, such as the human species today, multiplies quickly it inevitably interferes with the food or water supply of others and encroaches on their habitats. By doing so it may damage or destroy some of the very relationships on which it itself depends for survival. In practical terms this means that when local or national questions arise about how land should be used (e.g. whether a forested area should be used perhaps for agriculture or housing), although the owner of the property has a financial interest, the wider community has an interest too because it will to a greater or lesser extend be affected by the environmental consequences of any changes. However, environmental relationships are complex and imperfectly understood.

Attempts have been made to give weight to wider interests in land use by giving cash values to values to ‘natural capital’ so that they can be judged against conventional commercial value. Most recently this has been done for the UK in the National Ecosystem Assessment (https://uknea.unep-wcmc.org/Resources/tabid/82/Default.aspx) and the UK Government has indicated that it supports this approach.

It is intended that rather than a lecture, this should be a discussion seminar with an introduction of around twenty minutes followed by a wide-ranging discussion of the issues.

Bio,

Ron Oxburgh FRS (Lord Oxburgh of Liverpool) trained originally as a geologist and has worked as an academic, a civil servant and in business. He has taught and researched at Oxford, Cambridge, Caltech and Stanford and served as President of Queens’ College Cambridge.

Between 1987 and 1993 he was Chief Scientific Adviser to the Ministry of Defence and from 1993 to 2001 Rector of Imperial College. He was non-executive Chairman of Shell Transport and Trading until the Company merged with Royal Dutch Petroleum to form Royal Dutch Shell in 2005.

He is currently President of the Carbon Capture and Storage Association and Chairman of 2OC and GEO – small greentec startups. He is a former Chairman of the Trustees of the Natural History Museum and of the House of Lords Select Committee on Science and Technology. He is Foreign member of the US, Australian and German Academies of Science.



****All Welcome****

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