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Today's date is Thursday, October 29, 2020
School of Molecular Sciences
 June 2019
Thursday 13
12:00 - SEMINAR - Bayliss Seminar Series : Grishma Vadlamani - Understanding the structure and function of proteins involved in inducible AmpC β-lactamase resistance More Information
The inducible expression of AmpC β-lactamase is a major cause of β-lactam antibiotic resistance in several clinically relevant Gram-negative bacteria, including the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. AmpC induction is regulated by the transcriptional regulator AmpR, which binds to the divergent ampR-ampC operon and is activated by 1,6-anhydromuramoylpeptide – an anabolite of peptidoglycan (PG) recycling that is generated by the N-acetyl-β-glucosaminidase NagZ. I will be sharing my findings into the molecular basis of ampC induction based on the structural and biophysical characterization of the archetypal AmpR protein from Citrobacter freundii (CfAmpR). CfAmpR forms a homotetramer that is stabilized by binding the intergenic region of the ampR-ampC operon, and it interacts with up to four repressor ligands (UDP-MurNAc-pentapeptide) in an apparent stepwise manner. Since NagZ generates the AmpR activator ligand, blocking its activity enhances β-lactam efficacy against bacteria with inducible AmpC systems. Crystal structures of NagZ from Burkholderia cenocepacia were determined in complex with the glycosidase inhibitor O-(2-acetamido-2- deoxy-D-glucopyranosylidene)-amino-N-phenylcarbamate (PUGNAc) and its NagZ-selective derivative ethylbutyryl-PUGNAc, 3-acetamido-4,5,6-trihydroxyazepane (MM-124) and its NagZ-selective derivative MM-156, showing that plasticity within the NagZ active site could be exploited to improve the design of inhibitors that selectively bind NagZ over functionally related human N-acetyl-β-glucosaminidases. Furthering an understanding of the role of NagZ inhibition on β-lactam resistance in P. aeruginosa, it was found that the NagZ inhibitor PUGNAc could prevent the emergence of high-level AmpC-mediated β-lactam resistance, and significantly enhanced β-lactam susceptibility in synergy with the potent β-lactamase inhibitor avibactam in an ampC derepressed P. aeruginosa strain. Collectively, this talk offers key insights into the regulatory mechanism of AmpC β-lactamase expression and explores small molecule based strategies to potentiate β-lactam efficacy against Gram-negative bacterial pathogens.
Wednesday 19
12:00 - SEMINAR - Bayliss Seminar : Professor Rita Bernhardt – Uni of Saarlandes, Germany More Information

 July 2019
Wednesday 03
13:00 - SEMINAR - Deconstructing, replicating and engineering instructive niches for stem cell differentiation : School of Human Sciences Seminar Series More Information
Abstract: Most cells in our bodies are embedded in a complex matrix of extracellular molecules. These tissue-specific and dynamic microenvironments are essential for the functioning of the cells. But exactly what these microenvironments, or so-called "cell niche", are doing to the cells? Can we capture the "design principles" of these complex matrices on engineered microsystems, and guide in vitro cultured cells to form and function as a tissue? Traditional two-dimensional cell culture systems have been used to investigate the roles of tissue microenviroments. But these experimental systems are often too simplistic to reflect the complexity of the natural microenvironment. On the other hand, native tissue microenvironments, such as those provided by decellularised organs, are too complex to be reverse-engineered into model systems that can be studied and applied. This talk summarises our lab's recent attempts to deconstruct tissue microenvironments into their biochemical and architectural components, and investigate the roles of each components in guiding adult stem cell differentiation. The objective of this seminar is to introduce an interdisciplinary audience to the nature and challenges of our research question, and to present some of the approaches we are using to tackle it. Discussion with the cell biologists, bioengineers, materials scientists after the talk will hopefully bring forth fresh and creative ideas on this project.
Thursday 18
12:00 - SEMINAR - Bayliss Seminar Series : Development of New Polymyxin Antibiotics Targeting Gram-negative 'Superbugs' More Information
Postponed until November
Friday 19
12:00 - SEMINAR - Bayliss Seminar Series : Microbes and transition metals: insights into manganese and gold biogeochemical cycling More Information
Thursday 25
12:00 - SEMINAR - Bayliss Seminar Series More Information
Microbes and transition metals: insights into manganese and gold biogeochemical cycling

12:00 - SEMINAR - Bayliss Seminar Series : Microbes and transition metals: insights into manganese and gold biogeochemical cycling More Information
Tuesday 30
12:00 - SEMINAR - Multimodal Preclinical Imaging- High Frequency Ultrasound and Photoacoustic Imaging : Applications of High Frequency Ultrasound and Photoacoustic Imaging- Now available at the Centre for Microscopy, Characterisation and Analysis More Information
Applications of High Frequency Ultrasound and Photoacoustic Imaging in small animals- Cardiovascular Imaging & Analysis, Cancer Imaging, Kidney, Liver & Other Abdominal Organs, Reproductive, Embryo & Neonate Imaging, Ophthalmic Imaging, Image-Guided Needle Injections, Microvascular Perfusion with Contrast Agents,Molecular Imaging Techniques.

 August 2019
Friday 02
12:00 - SEMINAR - Bayliss Seminar Series : Mechanism and Application of Microbial Extracellular Electron Uptake Process More Information
Mechanism and Application of Microbial Extracellular Electron Uptake Process
Thursday 08
12:00 - SEMINAR - Bayliss Seminar Series More Information
X-ray diffraction and scattering at Curtin University: Big stuff, small stuff, hot stuff, cold stuff
Thursday 15
12:00 - CANCELLED - SEMINAR - Bayliss Seminar Series More Information
Unfortunately this event has been cancelled.

THIS SEMINAR HAS BEEN CANCELLED

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Molecular Phenotyping in Precision and Preventive Medicine
Friday 16
14:00 - SEMINAR - Bayliss Seminar Series : Dr Alastair Stewart, Laboratory Head, The Victor Chang Cardiac Research Institute, Sydney More Information
“Cryo-EM studies of E. coli F1Fo ATP synthase”
Monday 19
14:00 - SEMINAR - Bayliss Seminar Series : Prof. Dr Albrecht Berkessel More Information
Catalytic synthesis with titanium and Carbenes
Thursday 22
12:00 - SEMINAR - Bayliss Seminar Series : Tracey McClurg - APR Intern business development manager More Information
APR Intern connects Australia’s biggest problem solvers from a range of disciplines, enhancing the PhD experience of students by giving them the opportunity to apply their research skills within an industry context.

Friday 23
12:00 - SEMINAR - Bayliss Seminar Series : Dr. Helen Maynard-Casely - Senior Instrument Scientist, Australian Centre for Neutron Scattering More Information
Exploring the materials of the solar system with Australia’s central facilities
Wednesday 28
11:00 - SEMINAR - Bayliss Seminar Series : Latest advances in nanoscale IR spectroscopy and imaging More Information
Latest advances in nanoscale IR spectroscopy and imaging
Friday 30
12:00 - SEMINAR - Bayliss Seminar Series : A/Prof Jialing Bao - Southwest University/WESTA College - China More Information
Association of ideas about Cellular Biochemistry, Inflammation and Microsporidia

 September 2019
Tuesday 03
13:00 - SEMINAR - School of Human Sciences Seminar Series : Age-related pathway signatures – relevance for treating ageing disorders Website | More Information
Abstract: Ageing occurs in a regulated manner and the associated gene expression changes could contribute to the onset of many diseases, either by creating a permissive environment for pathology, or by directly inducing these conditions. We identified an Age-related Gene Expression Signature (AGES) in rats, by studying a time course of gene expression throughout the lifespan of the animal. Examining multiple tissues in rats aged 6, 9, 12, 18, 21, 24 and 27 months, we demonstrated tissue-specific and common gene pathway changes. Since AGES were shared by multiple tissues, it is plausible that perturbation of a discrete cell signalling pathway can extend life span and delay age-related diseases. We next asked, what is the impact of clinically-relevant low doses of rapalog on age-related pathway changes? Rapamycin or rapalogs (e.g. RAD001) that are inhibitors of mTORC1 (mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1), have been shown to increase lifespan and forestall age-related phenotypes in multiple species, including humans. Interestingly, the effect of RAD001 on age-related gene pathways was more pronounced in kidneys compared with other examined tissues (liver, skeletal muscle and hippocampus). The majority of the age-related pathways in the kidney were counter-regulated by a low dose of RAD001, and this was accompanied by reduction of age-related renal histopathology. We also examined the impact of RAD001 on molecular pathways implicated in skeletal muscle ageing (sarcopenia). This partial inhibition of the mTORC1 pathway counteracted age-related changes in expression of several genes related to senescence, muscle atrophy and deterioration of neuromuscular junctions, plus prevented loss of muscle mass for select muscles. These studies emphasise the potential benefit of drugs that target global signalling pathways as a successful strategy to reduce the adverse consequences of ageing.
Wednesday 04
14:00 - SEMINAR - School of Human Sciences Seminar Series : Cancer associated fibroblast mediated remodelling of the extracellular matrix as a driver of tumour progression and metastasis Website | More Information
Abstract: Homeostasis of the extracellular matrix (ECM) is critical for correct organ and tissue function. It plays a critical role in normal tissue homeostasis and pathological disease progression. Both the biochemical and biomechanical properties of the ECM contribute to modulating the behaviour of resident cells and are more than just passive bystanders. In tissue diseases such as cancer, the ECM undergoes significant change. These changes, driven by both tumour and stromal cells, feed into the progression of the disease. As such, changes in the ECM mark significant transition events in disease progression. Understanding how the changing ECM facilitates tumour progression and metastasis is an important step in the development of new therapeutic approaches for the treatment of cancer.
Friday 20
12:00 - SEMINAR - Bayliss Seminar Series : Dr. Philipp Bayer - Eukaryotic pangenomics – where we’ve been, where we’re going. More Information
Dr. Philipp Bayer - Eukaryotic pangenomics – where we’ve been, where we’re going.

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