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Today's date is Tuesday, August 04, 2020
School of Molecular Sciences
 July 2018
Friday 13
11:00 - UWA Research Event - Research Impact Series : Discover how our world-leading researchers are tackling global, national and regional issues to make the world a better place. Website | More Information
Research Impact Series Events:

Cosmos: Journey Through the Universe Thursday. 9 August, 18 October and 8 November 2018

Germaine Greer On Rape: Monday 3 September 2018

Raising the Bar Perth: 10 bars, 10 topics, 1 night only. Tuesday 11 September 2018

Achieving your Research Outcomes: Wednesday 17 - Thursday 18 October 2018

12:00 - SEMINAR - Bayliss Seminar Series : Programming developmental disease risk More Information
Tuesday 17
13:00 - SEMINAR - Seminar : School of Human Sciences Seminar Series - 17 July More Information
Associate Professor Stine Brandt Bering is a researcher within Comparative Pediatrics and Nutrition at University of Copenhagen, Denmark. She graduated as a Master of Science in Chemical Engineering (Biotechnology) from The Technical University of Denmark in 2001, and subsequently pursued her PhD studies in Human Nutrition at University of Copenhagen (2001-2006). She continued as a postdoctoral fellow at University of Copenhagen with a supplemental Marie Curie fellowship at The Institute of Food Research in Norwich, UK. Her research focus is on neonatal nutrition in relation to gastrointestinal and immune development in early life. Methods include in vivo animal models, human studies, in vitro cell models and ex vivo tissue studies to clarify specific intestinal responses and cellular mechanisms. Nutrients of interest are bioactive compounds, pre- and probiotics and human milk oligosaccharides. She is the leader of the cell and analytical laboratory in The Section for Comparative Pediatrics and Nutrition, PI of several grants and research administrator of the NEOMUNE research center.

Assistant Professor Duc Ninh Nguyen currently works at the section for Comparative Pediatrics and Nutrition, University of Copenhagen, Denmark. He graduated as a Master of Science in Food Science and Technology in 2011 and obtained a PhD in Food Science and Nutrition in 2014, both at the University of Copenhagen, Denmark. His research focus is on neonatal nutrition, gastroenterology and infectious diseases in early life. The main research tools include animal models of gut inflammation and perinatal infection (mainly preterm pigs) and in vitro intestinal epithelial cell models, together with analytical techniques related to immune assays, proteomics and protein biochemistry. He is also actively involved in design and planning of clinical trials in preterm infants, data management and biological sample analysis. He is the leader of the Immunology sub-group in the section for Comparative Pediatrics and Nutrition, co-PI and work package leader of several grants including STIMMUNE (Bioactive proteins to protect newborn neonates against perinatal inflammation, funded by Arla Food for Health) and NEOCOL (Colostrum for newborns, funded by Innovation Foundation Denmark).
Friday 20
12:00 - SEMINAR - Bayliss Seminar Series : Tailoring molecular probes for use in nuclear medicine More Information
Sunday 22
3:00 - FREE LECTURE - Free GAMSAT Lecture For UWA students : Learn the most effective tips and strategies for GAMSAT success Website | More Information
We're holding a free lecture to teach students everything they need to know to prepare for all three sections of the GAMSAT. We will cover the most effective proven tips and strategies.

Register Here - https://events.genndi.com/register/169105139238461790/9435750835
Thursday 26
12:00 - SEMINAR - Bayliss Seminar Series : Joshua Ramsay - Curtin University More Information
Regulated assembly and horizontal transfer of tripartite mobile DNA elements

12:00 - EVENT - Bayliss Seminar Series : Regulated assembly and horizontal transfer of tripartite mobile DNA elements More Information

 August 2018
Thursday 02
12:00 - SEMINAR - Bayliss Seminar Series : Exploring differential mortality rates of West Australian Indigenouse breast cancer patients More Information
Monday 06
10:00 - SEMINAR - CMCA Seminar Series : Advanced EELS and camera technology for research in physics, chemistry and life sciences More Information
Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is arguably the most powerful technique for the characterisation of materials structures at the micro-, nano- and sub-nanometer scales. Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy (EELS)is a TEM technique for composition and chemical environment or chemical bonding analysis. Image recording is critical for TEM study of materials. This presentation will focus on the newest development in the data acquisition and analysis of EELS and in camera technology. The new EELS technique enables the chemical bonding and electronic structural analysis for both light and heavy elements with very high energy resolution. The new TEM camera with ultra-high speed and detective quantum efficiency allows imaging beam-sensitive biomaterials and chemical materials with extremely low electron beam dose, which provides and effective solution to minimise structural degradation of the biomaterials and chemical materials during the TEM study process. Combination of state-of-art camera and EELS techniques offers an extremely powerful tool for the investigation of biomaterials and catalytic processes in nanoscale as well as the accurate quantitative elemental information.
Friday 10
12:00 - SEMINAR - Bayliss Seminar : Engineering resilience to green biotechnology More Information
Friday 24
12:00 - SEMINAR - Bayliss Seminar Series : Torsten Ochsenreiter - Mitochondrial DNA replication and segregation: what can we learn from non-standard model systems More Information
Thursday 30
12:00 - SEMINAR - Bayliss Seminar Series : Jie Chen - The mysterious microsporidia More Information

12:00 - SEMINAR - Bayliss Seminar : The mysterious microsporidia More Information

 September 2018
Friday 07
12:00 - EVENT - Bayliss Seminar : The Chemical bond and its history: a view from condensed matter physics More Information
Wednesday 12
13:00 - PRESENTATION - Ventana Discovery Ultra - Fully automated research : Presentation by Roche Diagnostics More Information
Roche Diagnostics invites you to join us for a presentation of the:

VENTANA DISCOVERY ULTRA For fully automated research IHC/ISH

Refreshments provided
Friday 14
12:00 - SEMINAR - Bayliss Seminar : Tyren Dodgen - Waters Australia More Information
Wednesday 19
11:00 - SEMINAR - Bayliss Seminar : Moana Simpson More Information

 October 2018
Friday 05
12:00 - EVENT - Bayliss Seminar : Identification of a novel family of Apicomplexan organellar More Information

12:00 - EVENT - Seminar Series : Thermodynamic modeling of ion transport More Information
Tuesday 16
13:00 - SEMINAR - To mend a broken heart, thou shalt learn from the ladies : School of Human Sciences Seminar Series More Information
Dr. Yun Wah Lam received his PhD training in the lab of Dr. Davina Opstelten at the University of Hong Kong. After receiving his PhD in 1996, he joined the group of Prof. Angus Lamond in Dundee, Scotland, where he developed an interest in the relationship of the architecture of mammalian cell nucleus and the regulation of gene expression. In 2007, he joined the Department of Biology and Chemistry, City University of Hong Kong. His team uses quantitative mass spectrometry to tackle a variety of biological projects, ranging from environmental sciences to regenerative medicine.

Abstract: Zebrafish is one of the most well-established animal models for heart regeneration. Here, we report the sexual dimorphism of zebrafish heart regeneration, with females regenerating their hearts faster than males. Estradiol treatment of males accelerated cardiac regeneration, while tamoxifen treatment of females reduced it. This sexual dimorphism was abolished by oxygen, suggesting the involvement of the Hypoxia-inducible factor 1a (HIF1a) pathway. Remarkably, cardiac damages induced plasma estrogen levels and the expression of estrogen receptor genes in zebrafish, leading to the feminisation of males, as evidenced by the detection of female-specific plasma proteins, including vitellogenins, in males during heart regeneration. Oxygen stimulated estrogen receptor expression in regenerating hearts in males, suggesting an interplay between the estrogen- and HIF1a-related mechanisms in heart regeneration. We show that vitellogenins were expressed in the liver and accumulated in damaged male hearts; but not in other wounds or in regenerating fins. Taken together, our data indicate that in zebrafish females are more efficient in mending broken hearts, and males are spontaneously feminised during heart regeneration. This unexpected phenomenon elucidates a previously unknown aspect of zebrafish tissue regeneration.

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