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Today's date is Sunday, October 25, 2020
School of Molecular Sciences
 July 2017
Friday 07
12:00 - SEMINAR - Bayliss Seminar Series : Assoc. Prof. Michael Higgins - New Advances in Probing Interfacial Molecular Structure and Dynamics of Water and Proteins using High-Speed and 3D-Atomic Force Microscopy More Information
Thursday 13
12:00 - PUBLIC TALK - Vascularization dynamics in engineered tissues : A public lecture by Professor Shulamit Levenberg, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Technion, Haifa, Israel Website | More Information
Vascularization continues to represent a major challenge in the successful implementation of regenerative strategies. Current approaches for inducing vascularization in vivo include pre-forming a vasculature ex vivo, and the use of a variety of strategies to stimulate vascularization in situ. Vessel network assembly within 3D tissues can be induced in vitro by means of co-culturing of endothelial cells, fibroblasts and cells specific to the tissue of interest. This approach supports formation of endothelial vessels and promotes endothelial and tissue-specific cell interactions. In addition, we have shown that in vitro pre-vascularization of engineered tissue can promote its survival and vascularization upon implantation and that implanted vascular networks, can anastomose with host vasculature and form functional blood vessels in vivo.

Sufficient vascularization in engineered tissues can be achieved through coordinated application of improved biomaterial systems with proper cell types. We have shown that vessel network maturity levels and morphology are highly regulated by matrix composition and analyzed the vasculogenic dynamics within the constructs. In addition, we have recently shown that adipose-derived endothelial cells and mesenchymal stem cells enhance vascular network formation on 3D constructs in vitro and can contribute to in vivo vascularization of tissue-engineered flaps. We also explored the effect of mechanical forces on vessels organization and demonstrated that morphogenesis of 3D vascular networks is regulated by tensile forces. Revealing the cues controlling vascular network properties and morphology can enhance in-vitro tissue vascularization and improve graft integration prospects..

Professor Levenberg conducts interdisciplinary research on stem cells and vascular tissue engineering. She did her PhD at the Weizmann Institute on cell adhesion and her post doctorate research at MIT on stem cells tissue engineering with Professor Robert Langer, a world leader in biomaterials, drug delivery and tissue engineering. In 2004 she joined the Technion Faculty of Biomedical Engineering. During 2011-2012 she spent her sabbatical year as a visiting professor at the Wyss institute at Harvard University. In her research she studies the mechanical control of tissue assembly in vitro and in vivo with a focus on vessel network formation and anastomosis in engineered tissues. She is also developing micro bioreactors and nanoliter droplet devices for stem cell growth and manipulations and for early diagnostic applications. Levenberg is currently the elected Dean of the Biomedical Engineering Department at the Technion and a member of the Israel National Bioethics Committee.

12:00 - EVENT - Bayliss Seminar Series : Professor Anthony Akkari – Pharmacogenetics Safety, Efficacy and Motor Neuron Disease Therapeutics More Information
Friday 14
12:00 - EVENT - Bayliss Seminar Series : Prof. Neil Barnett - Deakin University, The 2017 Royal Society of Chemistry Australasian Lectureship More Information
Thursday 20
12:00 - EVENT - Bayliss Seminar Series : Title TBA More Information
Wednesday 26
18:00 - PUBLIC LECTURE - Aspirin: how long can this old dog surprise us with new tricks? : Public Lecture with Dr John Eikelboom, Department of Medicine, McMaster University, Ontario, Canada Website | More Information
Aspirin has been used to relieve pain and discomfort for thousands of years and has been commercially available for more than 100 years. Today it is one of the most widely used drugs globally and can be obtained without prescription from most supermarket and corner stores.

Scientific discoveries detailing the mechanism of action and the benefits of aspirin for patients are detailed in thousands of research papers published over the past century. People were aware of aspirin’s analgesic and anti-inflammatory properties long before any research was performed, but it was not until scientists found that it reduced blood clotting that aspirin transformed the management of patients with cardiovascular disease. Aspirin’s cardiovascular benefits are explained by its unique pharmacology. When taken at low doses, aspirin is cleared from the circulation within an hour. It takes only minutes for aspirin to permanently block the blood platelets that cause heart attack and stroke, and its rapid clearance limits the potentially harmful effects of aspirin on the walls of blood vessels when it is given in higher doses.

Recent discoveries have further refined our understanding of the cardiovascular benefits of aspirin. The evidence supporting its use for the treatment of heart attack and stroke is overwhelming, but we are now less certain of its benefits for “primary” prevention in persons without a history of cardiovascular disease, and aspirin may even be harmful when used for this reason in older persons. Possibly balancing this concern is the unexpected finding that continued use of aspirin for more than a decade prevents the onset of cancer.

Current aspirin research focuses on the evaluation of aspirin for new indications, optimizing its benefits with alternative dosing regimens, and reducing the risks of bleeding. Aspirin does not fully protect against the risk of a further heart attack or stroke, and trials currently underway are exploring whether its use in combination with other treatments is more effective. Efforts to replace aspirin with potentially more effective and safer new designer drugs have so far proven unsuccessful, and in the meantime new aspirin discoveries continue unabated.

How long can this old dog continue to surprise us with new tricks?

John Eikelboom, MBBS, MSc, FRCPC is Associate Professor in the Department of Medicine, McMaster University, and haematologist in the Thrombosis Service, Hamilton General Hospital, Ontario, Canada. He originally trained in Internal Medicine and Haematology in Perth, Australia and subsequently moved to Hamilton to take up a Tier II Canada Research Chair in Cardiovascular Medicine. Dr Eikelboom has co-authored more than 500 articles in peer-reviewed journals. His current research, supported by the Canadian Institutes for Health Research, the Heart and Stroke Foundation and the National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia, focuses on the efficacy and safety of antithrombotic therapies, outcomes after blood transfusion and bleeding, and the mechanisms of variable response to antiplatelet drugs.
Monday 31
12:00 - SEMINAR - Bayliss Seminar Series : Visualising Chemistry at the Single Molecule Level More Information
Visualising Chemistry at the Single Molecule Level

 August 2017
Thursday 03
16:00 - STUDENT EVENT - Telethon Kids Institute - Prospective Student Evening : An information evening for all students considering a postgraduate degree in medical research Website | More Information
Telethon Kids Institute (UWA's Centre for Child Health Research) invites all prospective Honours, M.D., and higher degree by research students to join us for the evening to learn more about becoming a student with us. Our supervisors will be speaking to students about their student projects, and answering any questions you may have. You will get to learn more about what we do, our current research projects, and our facilities. You will also get a chance to meet current students and learn more about our student programs, scholarships and support services. It's a great opportunity to secure your supervisors and project for the coming year! To RSVP, please visit prospectivestudentevening2017.splashthat.com
Tuesday 08
13:00 - CANCELLED - SEMINAR - Bayliss Seminar Series : Dr Michelle Watt More Information
Unfortunately this event has been cancelled.



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Wednesday 09
12:00 - SEMINAR - Bayliss Seminar Series : Prof. Stephen Hashmi - “Challenges in Gold Catalysis ” More Information
Thursday 10
12:00 - SEMINAR - Bayliss Seminar Series : Soren Bock – Phd Student, Research Completion Seminar -UWA More Information
Thursday 17
12:00 - SEMINAR - BAYLISS SEMINAR SERIES : Mark Cruickshank - Infant leukaemia – are we targeting a one-hit wonder? More Information
Friday 18
12:00 - SEMINAR - Bayliss Seminar Series : Nadim Darwish - Towards single-molecule devices: Mechanically stable single-molecule circuits More Information
Friday 25
12:00 - SEMINAR - Bayliss Seminar Series : Max Roemer - Ferrocene based compounds as highly efficient molecular diodes More Information
Thursday 31
12:00 - SEMINAR - Bayliss Seminar Series : Xiaoling Tong - Silkworm functional genomics: Potential application in biotechnology and as human disease model More Information

12:30 - VISITING SPEAKER - Assessment of Future Risk in Asthma: Opportunities and New Technologies Website | More Information
Dr Blakey's interest is in improving the assessment and management of people with asthma by incorporating newer data streams and measurement of future risk into models of care. Note: 12.30pm lunch for 1.00pm - 2.00pm presentation

 September 2017
Friday 01
12:00 - SEMINAR - Bayliss Seminar Series : Nikki Man - The synthesis and pharmacological studies on a novel antimicrobial agent & new nickel catalysts and their applications in organic synthesis More Information
Wednesday 06
18:00 - EVENT - WA Department of Health Youth Health Policy Community Conversation #1 : If you are 13-24 we want to hear your thoughts on the new Youth Health Policy! Website | More Information
Are you aged 13 - 24? We want to hear from YOU! We want to find out what you think about health services for young people. The WA Department of Health wants to hear from people aged 13 – 24 about the WA Youth Health Policy. You are invited to come along and share your thoughts and ideas.

We want to hear from everyone; people who are well and healthy, those with chronic conditions, people with a disability, refugees or migrants, Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander, lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer and intersex, those living in rural and remote areas... we want to hear from you all!

Free pizza, refreshments and small payment provided. There will be four community conversations in the metropolitan area, one in Bunbury and one in Broome. Visit our website https://bit.ly/IPIRevents for all dates and venues.
Friday 08
12:00 - SEMINAR - Bayliss Seminar Series : Valerie Verhasselt - Impact of mother-child interaction through breast milk on immune development and long term homeostasis More Information
Monday 11
18:00 - EVENT - WA Department of Health Youth Health Policy Community Conversation #2 : If you are 13-24 we want to hear your thoughts on the new Youth Health Policy! Website | More Information
Are you aged 13 - 24? We want to hear from YOU! We want to find out what you think about health services for young people. The WA Department of Health wants to hear from people aged 13 – 24 about the WA Youth Health Policy. You are invited to come along and share your thoughts and ideas.

We want to hear from everyone; people who are well and healthy, those with chronic conditions, people with a disability, refugees or migrants, Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander, lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer and intersex, those living in rural and remote areas... we want to hear from you all!

Free pizza, refreshments and small payment provided. There will be four community conversations in the metropolitan area, one in Bunbury and one in Broome. Visit our website https://bit.ly/IPIRevents for all dates and venues.

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