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Today's date is Sunday, September 20, 2020
Events for the public
 November 2019
Sunday 17
10:00 - EVENT - Art Upmarket- Perth's best dedicated art fair : Perth's best dedicated art fair Website | More Information
Art Upmarket – Perth’s best art fair Sat 17th October 2020 Art Upmarket is all about connecting art lovers with Perth’s best artists. Meet the artists and purchase art directly from them on the day. Fill your home with local art. The market will showcase a curated selection of more than 60 of Perth’s most talented artists in Winthrop Hall.

Saturday 17th October 2020 – 10am-4pm

Free entry and parking. Venue is easily accessible.

Venue: The University of Western Australia’s Winthrop Hall and Undercroft, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley 6009

Website: www.perthupmarket.com.au Facebook.com/artupmarket www.instagram.com/artupmarket #artupmarket
Monday 18
18:00 - PERFORMANCE - UWA Music presents: Student Recitals : Mark Warrener (Horn) More Information
Each year the Conservatorium of Music celebrates the amazing talent of our performance and composition students in a series of senior and graduation recitals. These recitals are the culmination of years of hard work and dedication and showcase the technical, musical and artistic skills of these young emerging artists. Recitals take place in Callaway music Auditorium (unless otherwise specified) and are free to attend, so come and see these emerging artists delight!

Mon 18 Nov | 6.00pm | Mark Warrener (Horn)

Messiaen - Appel Interstellaire | Beethoven - Horn Sonata (1st mvnt) | Brahms - Horn Trio | Kerry Turner - ‘Twas a Dark and Stormy Night
Tuesday 19
18:00 - PUBLIC TALK - Perils of Fornicating on the Beach : Reproductive constraints in a keystone fish may underpin collapse of the Northwest Atlantic foodweb Website | More Information
A public lecture by Dr Craig Purchase, Associate Professor of Biology, Memorial University of Newfoundland and a UWA Institute of Advanced Studies Visiting Fellow.

Keystone species hold critical roles in the functioning of foodwebs. About 30 years ago, the Northwest Atlantic Ocean foodweb was uprooted with the collapse of cod stocks, and continues to undergo substantial change. Capelin are the most important fish in the region, converting zooplankton protein to forage for larger fish, seabirds and marine mammals. Major shifts in life history characteristics of capelin occurred in the early 90s concomitant with a biomass collapse, which has not recovered. Capelin are well known for their unusual sex lives, where extremely high densities of fish spawn together in the surf zone of beaches. In this talk, Dr Purchase will discuss his research on capelin reproduction, and how evolutionary constraints may underpin the observed changes in ecosystem functioning.
Wednesday 20
18:00 - PUBLIC TALK - Astrochemistry Website | More Information
A public lecture by Professor Dahbia Talbi, Laboratoire Univers et Particules de Montpellier, University of Montpellier, France.

A surprisingly rich chemistry occurs in space, as evidenced by the discovery so far of nearly 200 different molecules in the interstellar medium and in stellar atmospheres. How do astronomers identify molecules in space? In which environments are they found? How are these molecules formed? What does this tell us about the places where they are found? How does astrochemistry connect to astrobiology?

In this public lecture, Professor Talbi will provide answers to these intriguing questions.

Dahbia Talbi is a theoretical chemist, who began her career in 1988 with the French National Center for Scientific Research (CNRS). She was introduced to astrochemistry during her PhD thesis and has since continued in this field, conducting her research at the interface of chemistry, physics and astrophysics.

After 12 years in the Astrophysics Laboratory of the “Ecole Normale Supérieur de Paris”, she moved to the University of Nice to initiate and develop astrochemistry research. In 2004 she joined the Cosmochimistry Group of the Museum of Natural History of Paris and in 2006 decided to create her own group of astrochemistry in the Stellar Physics laboratory of Montpellier. She was promoted CNRS Senior Investigator (Directrice de Recherche au CNRS) in 2009 and took the head of the Stellar Physics research group of Montpellier in 2010 for four years.

Her first visit to UWA was in 1998, at the invitation of Professor Graham Chandler. Her current visit is her eighth, within a collaboration that includes (since 2013) Dr. A. Karton and Dr. D. Spagnoli from the UWA School of Molecular Sciences. Her interest in interstellar and stellar chemistry includes gas-phase processes, ice catalyzed reactions and grain formation mechanisms.
Thursday 21
15:00 - EVENT - Centre for Muslim States and Societies Seminar Series 2019 : Financial inclusion: Women-focused Islamic banking in Kenya More Information
Development theories see inclusion and access to finance as a critical factor in overcoming persistent income inequality and slower growth in economies. Well-functioning financial systems are not only significant for channelling funds to the most productive uses and help to boost economies, but also for improving opportunities and reducing poverty. As the importance of a healthy financial system continues to be focusedon globally, development practice progressively recognises the ethical and religious suitability of financial systems.

Islamic finance is thus fast becoming a significant commercial sector in many countries including Kenya that seeks to service not only its Muslim population, but also offers ethical banking to non-Muslim clients. With a focus on Islamic finance and banking in Kenya, this presentation examines the prospects for financial inclusion of women through Islamic women-focused banking.

The presentation is based on research done on Islamic banks in Kenya.

FREE entry but RSVP: [email protected]

All welcome to attend.

18:00 - PUBLIC TALK - Engineering Empathy Website | More Information
A public lecture by Professor Philip Gerrans, Professor of Philosophy, University of Adelaide and 2019 Institute of Advanced Studies Visiting Fellow.

In a near future the most basic and intimate of human needs from infancy to end of life will be met by artificial intelligence and robotics. Can such systems care for us without feeling for us? Does this matter? Clearly it does because a vast field of social robotics tries to implement human emotion and empathetic concern in artificial systems. However, despite spectacular improvements in AI, emotional feeling remains a last frontier. At the same time the neuroscientific study of emotion has made rapid advances in understanding the relationship between bodily states and emotional feelings. This suggests that there are lessons for AI here. Professor Gerrans will discuss the prospects for a genuine artificial intelligence of emotion based on neuroscience. He then discuss whether emotional AI is a worthwhile goal, even in fields such as child and aged care that intuitively require empathy.

18:00 - TALK - Free Seminar: Climate Windows for Polynesian Voyaging Across the Pacific : A/Prof Ian D Goodwin's research has reconstructed the Pacific climate, decade by decade, for the past millennium. Website | More Information
A signature of modern climate change is the poleward expansion of the tropics, but has it happened in the recent millennia? And how can past climate reconstruction help us to understand future changes in Southern Hemisphere marine climate and coasts? Associate Professor in Marine Climatology, Coastal Oceanography and Glaciology at Macquarie University and adjunct research fellow at the UWA Oceans Institute, Ian D Goodwin presents this free public seminar as part of the Ocean's Institute Anthropocene Oceans Seminar Series . Ian will describe how climate change opened windows of opportunity for Polynesian seafarers to use changing windfields to voyage and colonise the Pacific, in particular, Easter Island and New Zealand, and forays into the Southern Ocean and South America during the Medieval Period. At the same time these ocean winds and waves were shaping our modern Australian coast, and he will provide an insight into how past climate reconstruction can help to understand future changes in Southern Hemisphere marine climate and coasts. Ian has almost 40 years research experience in the fields of climatology, paleoclimatology and climate change science, coastal and marine geoscience, coastal oceanography, and polar glaciology. He uses proxy climate data from natural archives such as ice cores, corals, coastal sediments, together with historical meteorology to reconstruct natural climate variability, ocean wind and wave patterns, coastline change, and human maritime voyaging.
Friday 22
11:00 - SEMINAR - Linguistics Seminar Series 2019 : Yarnin’ the blackfella way: Quotation in urban Aboriginal English More Information
Metropolitan cities around the world have increasingly become global. Linguistically, this trend is linked to the ingress of linguistic variants readily taken up by metropolitan youth (Cukor-Avila, 2012). Quotative be like is one such variant and the quotative system of English worldwide has changed drastically since its inception. Tagliamonte, D’Arcy &Rodríguez Louro (2016) document overwhelming parallelism in how quotation is deployed across English varieties. Are Aboriginal English speakers participating in global linguistic change? If so, what is the trajectory of this change? We ask these questions not to measure Aboriginal English against a ‘standard English’ canon (cf. Dickson, Forthcoming) but to interrogate how linguistic change across distinct social groups may be seen as indicative of social cohesion (or lack thereof).

Our data stem from the DECRA Corpus of Aboriginal English (Rodríguez Louro, 2018-2021) currently consisting of over 50 hours of talk-in-interaction data stemming from the speech of 70 speakers aged 11-88 who reside in urbanised Nyungar country. We circumscribe the envelope of variation functionally to include all uses of direct quotation, internal thought and non-lexicalised sounds and gestures (example 1). We use linear mixed-effects logistic regression. Our preliminary results show highly constrained discourse-pragmatic variation with marked generational differences. The suite of quotative verbs in the Aboriginal English sample shows a variability of forms unattested in white Australia (where the bulk of the variation is represented by say amongst the pre-1960s-born and by be like amongst millennials and Generation Zs). Additionally, tense and grammatical person operate differently in Aboriginal English where the historical present is not lexically conditioned and first person plural subjects play a prominent role.

(1) So I come running out of the room. […]. I said, ‘Don’t open the door. Now she knows we’re home’. Then ah, well, she goes, ‘Oh, it’s okay’. I said, ‘You deal with her then, you deal with her’, because she thought she knew. […]. She opens the door now. She says, ‘Oh, come inside. Do you need any help?’ I said to her, ‘I’m warning you, don’t take that meat off her’ because she had a trolley, a pram with no baby in there, a pram full of meat. Then she comes pushing it in. She’s like, ‘Hi darling, how you going? Thanks for letting me in your house’, and pushes the white girl and says ‘Get out of my way’ and walks in the kitchen. She’s like ‘I’m making a feed, I don’t care’. I walked out. She reckoned, ‘See, that’s my niece there. She’s black. I’m allowed in this house.’ (Female/18/2001) Our findings support Malcolm’s (2018: 23) claims that the difference between Aboriginal and mainstream Australian English is emblematic of a lack of integration between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal speech communities which have ‘maintained a largely parallel existence in Australian society’. They also align with Wolfram & Schilling-Estes’s (2006: 229) finding that most African Americans ‘do not participate in major dialect changes’ attested in European American communities in the USA. In sum, the disparities between the quotative systems of Aboriginal English and Anglo-Celtic Australian English are the linguistic reflex of the social chasm between black and white Australia.

Celeste Rodriguez Louro is a Senior Lecturer in Linguistics and an Australian Research Council DECRA Fellow at UWA. Trained in Argentina, the USA and Australia, Celeste is interested in the linguistic and social factors shaping language usage and in how this usage ultimately contributes to language evolution. Her current DECRA fellowship is allowing her to document sociolinguistic variation in cross-generational Aboriginal English, in collaboration with Glenys Collard.

Glenys Collard is an Executive Member at Mallee Aboriginal Corporation and an Honorary Research Fellow at UWA. A South West Nyungar woman and matriarch within her nuclear family of over 300 people, Glenys has experience working in government and non-government agencies including providing training on Aboriginal English. In the public sector, contributes significantly to developments related to policy and planning. She has also co-authored numerous educational and academic papers.

20:00 - PERFORMANCE - DESTINATIONS: Ives, Reich and Milligan : A rare performance of profound American masterworks and a new composition by UWA Graduate Kate Milligan Website | More Information
Join the Perth Orchestra Project and conductor Izaak Wesson for a programme of profound American music from the 20th century, as well a new composition by Perth-born composer Kate Milligan. POP is enormously proud to present this concert of masterworks by Charles Ives and Steve Reich, both of whom meditate on the fragility, duality, displacement and mysticism of the human condition in their respective works.

Ives’ brief but intensely introspective The Unanswered Question was a work decades ahead of its time, which provides a stunning opening to the concert. Reich’s Different Trains is a monolith of 20th century music and considered a seminal memorial piece to the Holocaust. The concert concludes with a new piece by UWA composition graduate Kate Milligan for flutes, strings and electronics. The world premiere of her work Migrations is sure to provide a poignant link to our contemporary time and place.

PRE-CONCERT TALK AT 7.30PM ON FRIDAY 22nd of NOVEMBER IN THE EILEEN JOYCE STUDIO, UWA CONSERVATORIUM OF MUSIC
Saturday 23
8:30 - PUBLIC TALK - AfREC WA African Women’s Open Forum on Conflict Resolution : An public engagement session in the WA African Women’s Leadership, Empowerment & Development (A-LEAD) Program 2019-20, co-convened by the Organisation of African Communities in WA and UWA AfREC. More Information
“Together We Influence and Empower One Another”

Come along and engage with expert and high-profile speakers and community leaders as we address the issues, causes and remedies of conflicts in various places including the workplace, social setting and in the community. The session will focus on such areas as identification of potential conflict, skills needed to deal with conflict within the law, resolving conflict legally and consequences of resolving conflict outside the law and you will have an opportunity share ideas and experiences and raise any other areas you feel are relevant to your situation.

The WA African Women's Leadership, Empowerment & Development (A-LEAD) Program is a joint project between OACWA and the University of Western Australia’s (UWA) Africa Research & Engagement Centre (AfREC). A-LEAD seeks to develop and enhance African-Australian women’s leadership and networking skills,and builds leadership capacity in ways that will have a positive impact in African communities and wider Western Australian society.

9:30 - EVENT - Creative Travel Photography : Learn from Master Photographer and National Geographic finalist Website | More Information
Everybody who travels wants to return with stunning memories of the people and places they have experienced. Learn how to capture great travel images with one of Australia’s top travel and photo tours photographers, Nick Melidonis and ensure the time you spend on travel is reflected in high impact photography. This inspiring and fun course is for those wanting to record their personal journeys and capturing powerful images of people and landscapes to share with friends and family or for books, prints and exhibitions. Nick Melidonis is one of Australia’s foremost photographers and photo educators for over two decades. A Master Photographer with five gold bars; he was named number two in the world in 2016 in ‘Nature’ (landscape and wildlife) in the prestigious World Photographic Cup winning a silver medal. He was also a finalist in the National Geographic 2016 'Travel Photographer of the Year'. Nick is one of only three photographers to have won the 8’AIPP Australian Landscape Photographer of the Year' three times.
Sunday 24
10:00 - EVENT - Perth Upmarket : Discover Perth's best design market at UWA Website | More Information
Perth Upmarket is Perth’s original and best design market, featuring more than 180 of Perth's most talented artists, designers, craftsmen and foodies all at The University of Western Australia's Winthrop Hall.

There is something for everyone, including a Junior Upmarket section in Hackett Hall which showcases all the best local designers for kids' clothing, toys, games and decor. Have a browse through the gourmet section to inspire your inner Masterchef, shop original locally designed homewares or find the perfect gift for someone special. Then enjoy a coffee or lunch relaxing on the beautiful lawns around Winthrop Hall.

DETAILS:

Sunday 24th November 2019

Time: 10am-4pm Venue: The University of Western Australia’s Winthrop Hall Parking and entry free, venue is easily accessible, 3 ATMs on site 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley Website: www.perthupmarket.com.au Facebook.com/perthupmarket
Tuesday 26
13:00 - SEMINAR - UWA Data Science Summer Forum : The forum aims to bring together UWA researchers and research students working in Data Science. More Information
This Data Science Forum will showcase research presentations from UWA researchers whose research is in an area of Data Science, who use or want to use more statistics and computing, or who are engaged or want to engage in interdisciplinary research with statisticians and computer scientists.

The forum aims to bring together UWA researchers and research students working in Data Science or with data in order to start and enhance collaborative research.

This is a free event but spaces are limited so please register via the following link: bit.ly/2IzpUrz

Tea, coffee and snacks will be provided.

For further information please contact Professor Inge Koch at [email protected]

18:00 - PUBLIC TALK - Technology and the Future of Work: an international perspective in the shadow of the competition for talent Website | More Information
A public lecture by Gordon L Clark, Professorial Fellow, University of Oxford; Sir Louis Matheson Distinguished Visiting Professor, Department of Banking and Finance, Monash University and 2019 UWA Institute of Advanced Studies Visiting Fellow.

It is widely believed that technology – automation, AI, and the Internet of things and people – will make many people redundant and transform labour markets around the world. It is also believed that machines will replace people, and the future is now.

In this lecture, Professor Clark offers a rather different perspective, grounded in multi-year, international study at Oxford University on workers’ concerns for the future and the challenges facing employers competing for talent in an increasingly crowded marketplace. He identifies commonalities and differences on these issues around the world.

His view about “technology and the future of work” is cautiously optimistic arguing that there may well be a significant premium for talented individuals willing and able to adapt to changing conditions. As well, he suggests that employers already face significant challenges in holding key personnel and that these challenges are likely to grow rather than be ameliorated by technological change over the coming couple of decades.

Being cautiously optimistic about the future is not the same as seeing the world in ‘rose-tinted glasses’! He reports on recent research regarding workers’ fears about the future, their willingness to retrain, and their likely flexibility in the face of getting older, maintaining family and community relationships, and generally living a good life.

He draws implications for the roles and responsibilities of individuals, communities, employers, and governments given the threat of increasing inequality in labour markets – local, regional, and global. And he also emphasises that technological change can work hand-in-hand with population-ageing to redistribute the benefits of economic prosperity.

19:00 - PERFORMANCE - UWA Music presents: Student Recitals : Ciara Sudlow (Violin) More Information
Each year the Conservatorium of Music celebrates the amazing talent of our performance and composition students in a series of senior and graduation recitals. These recitals are the culmination of years of hard work and dedication and showcase the technical, musical and artistic skills of these young emerging artists. Recitals take place in Callaway music Auditorium (unless otherwise specified) and are free to attend, so come and see these emerging artists delight!

Tues 26 Nov | 7.00pm | Ciara Sudlow (Violin)

Wednesday 27
13:00 - PUBLIC TALK - Heat Therapy: An ancient practice to target modern diseases Website | More Information
A public lecture by Christopher T. Minson, PhD, Kenneth and Kenda Singer Professor, and UWA Institute of Advanced Studies Visiting Fellow.

Chronic heat exposure, in the form of saunas, hot water baths, and sweat lodges have been utilized in many cultures for thousands of years. While repetitive bouts of heat exposure is generally believed to be healthy, it is only recently that we are beginning to understand the full benefits of ‘heat therapy’ across the spectrum of human health. Passive heating results in a rise in body temperature and changes in cardiovascular hemodynamics, including altered shear patterns of blood flow. There is growing evidence that these responses to acute heat stress combine over repetitive sessions to provide a stress-resistant profile to counter inflammation and oxidative stress, as occurs with aging and chronic disease, as well as from acute damaging events such as ischemia-reperfusion injury. There is also growing evidence heat therapy can be used to target metabolic dysfunction in obesity and diabetes through improvements in insulin signaling in fat and muscle cells. This ancient therapy needs broader application to treat modern diseases, particularly in those not able to obtain the full benefits of exercise.

Dr Christopher Minson is the Kenneth and Kenda Singer Professor of Human Physiology. His research focuses on topics related to integrative cardiovascular physiology in humans. His lab investigates how we can use exposures to extreme environments to gain a healthy and resilient physiology. He is also involved in projects related to endocrine function in women, biomarkers of aging and the risk of cardiovascular and metabolic diseases, and finding novel ways to improve thermal comfort and safely in work environments. He also works with elite athletes in the use of environmental stressors to improve performance.

Dr Minson is a 2019 Institute of Advanced Studies Visiting Fellow.

This public lecture is presented by the UWA School of Human Sciences (Exercise and Sport Science).

18:00 - PUBLIC TALK - Re-presenting Islam and Muslims Post 9/11: Images, Words and Refusals : Public talk by Zulfikar Hirji, Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology, York University, Toronto Website | More Information
In a Post-9/11 world of evermoving words and images, how do we respond to negative and stereotypical representations of Islam and Muslims? Zulfikar Hirji discusses the perennial challenge of decolonizing and deorientalising portrayals of Islam and Muslims by drawing upon and theories of ‘recognition’ and ‘refusal’ articulated by Indigenous scholars in North America, and by reflecting upon his journey through academia and experience of producing 'Islam: An Illustrated Journey' (2018), a book that explores the diverse histories of Islam and Muslims over more than 1400 years.

Zulfikar Hirji (DPhil, Oxford) is Associate Professor in the Department of Anthropology at York University, Toronto. Professor Hirji’s scholarly interests are on Islam and Muslims in historical and contemporary contexts and on issues of knowledge production, representation and identity, visual and material culture, and critical pedagogy. He has conducted ethnographic fieldwork and archival research in South Asia, East Africa, the Arabian Peninsula, Europe and North America.
Thursday 28
17:00 - SEMINAR - Centre for Muslim States and Societies Seminar Series 2019- Event Cancelled : Islamic Revivalism and Politics in Malaysia: Problems in Nation Building More Information
In this lecture, Dr Bob Olivier explains the Islamisation process that has unfolded in Malaysia over the last fifty years. Based on his forthcoming book published by Palgrave Macmillan, Dr Olivier will present the findings from in-depth interviews with 100 of Malaysia’s “educated classes”, or “elite”, regarding their reactions to the changes that have accompanied Islamisation in the country, and how they feel it has impacted on them. The seminar will also shed light on the impacts the change in government in May 2019 is likely to have.

The lecture will be followed by light refreshments.

Profile highlights: • 24 years PA Consulting Group, in Australia, Hong Kong and Malaysia, last position Head of South-East Asia Region. • 25 years Founder and Chairman of ASPAC Executive Search, one of Malaysia’s leading search firms. • 21 years as a Director of the British Malaysian Chamber of Commerce. • Currently a Member of the Senate of the University of Western Australia. • Currently an Adviser to the Centre for Muslim States and Societies.

FREE ENTRY BUT RSVP: [email protected]

All welcome to attend.

18:00 - PUBLIC TALK - Anthropology and Sociology Seminar Series : The Unseen Archive of Idi Amin More Information
Over his eight years as president of Uganda, Idi Amin was the subject of hundreds of thousands of photographs. A team of photographers under the Ministry of Information followed Amin around, taking pictures of the many occasions when he appeared before the public. For decades it was thought that the photographs taken by the men of the Ministry had been lost.

However, in 2015, Richard Vokes, working with Winston Agaba and Malachi Kabaale at the Uganda Broadcasting Corporation in Kampala, uncovered a filing cabinet with over 70,000 of their photographic negatives. In 2018, UBC in partnership with Derek Peterson of the University of Michigan, and UWA, launched a project to digitize the archive. The first major exhibition of these images is now showing at the Uganda Museum.

In this lecture, Richard Vokes will narrate the social biography of the archive, and explore what it reveals about Idi Amin the man, about the nature of his regime, and about everyday life in Amin’s Uganda. It will argue that although the archive has provided extraordinary new insights into the Amin years, so too its discovery and exhibition have raised complicated questions regarding the politics of memory in post-colonial Uganda. The lecture will describe how the project team have sought to engage with public discussions on this subject, in partnership with our many Ugandan collaborators – who include survivors of Amin’s torture chambers, and the relatives of his 300,000 victims.

About the Speaker

Richard Vokes is Associate Professor in Anthropology at UWA. His research focuses primarily on Uganda, where he has been conducting ethnographic fieldwork since 2000. He has published extensively, including on the history of photography, media and social change. His books include: Ghosts of Kanungu (2009); Routes and Traces: Anthropology, Photography and the Archive (with Marcus Banks, 2010); Photography in Africa (2012); Media and Development (2018) and; The Unseen Archive of Idi Amin (with Derek Peterson, forthcoming 2020).

Free event! RSVP: online via www.ias.uwa.edu.au/lectures/vokes

18:00 - EVENT - The Unseen Archive of Idi Amin Website | More Information
A public lecture by Richard Vokes, Associate Professor in Anthropology, The University of Western Australia.

Over his eight years as president of Uganda, Idi Amin was the subject of hundreds of thousands of photographs. A team of photographers under the Ministry of Information followed Amin around, taking pictures of the many occasions when he appeared before the public. For decades it was thought that the photographs taken by the men of the Ministry had been lost. However in 2015 Richard Vokes, working with Winston Agaba and Malachi Kabaale at the Uganda Broadcasting Corporation in Kampala, uncovered a filing cabinet with over 70,000 of their photographic negatives. In 2018, UBC in partnership with Derek Peterson of the University of Michigan, and UWA, launched a project to digitize the archive. The first major exhibition of these images is now showing at the Uganda Museum.

In this lecture, Richard Vokes will narrate the social biography of the archive, and explore what it reveals about Idi Amin the man, about the nature of his regime, and about everyday life in Amin’s Uganda. It will argue that although the archive has provided extraordinary new insights into the Amin years, so too its discovery and exhibition have raised complicated questions regarding the politics of memory in post-colonial Uganda. The lecture will describe how the project team have sought to engage with public discussions on this subject, in partnership with our many Ugandan collaborators – who include survivors of Amin’s torture chambers, and the relatives of his 300,000 victims.

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