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Today's date is Friday, October 30, 2020
Events for the public
 May 2019
Thursday 23
16:00 - SEMINAR - Archaeology Seminar Series : Vessel of Globalization: The Many Worlds of the Edwin Fox, 1853-1905 More Information
The merchant vessel Edwin Fox was exceptional for being unexceptional. It was old fashioned even before its keel was laid down in Thomas Reeves’s shipyards near Calcutta in 1853. It was neither large nor fast, and had none of the prestige of the great tea and opium clippers that captured the public imagination in the mid-nineteenth century. The Edwin Fox was a small, ugly slowpoke in the heyday of the age of sail and a lonesome survivor in the age of steam, and from a mariner’s perspective it sat at the bottom of the hierarchy of opportunities. Yet the life and career of this undistinguished ship coincide with a pivotal era in globalization: the years between 1860 and 1890 that Jurgen Osterhammel calls the “inner focal point” of the 19th century. And the Edwin Fox participated in many of the developments that made these years so crucial: the rapid expansion and intensification of trade around the globe; the spread of industrialization to many regions; the great thrust of Western imperialism; the unprecedentedly large migrations of people, both free and forced; the large-scale and systematic dispossession of indigenous peoples and their replacement with settler populations; the integration of settler colonies into imperial markets; and environmental change on a massive scale. Beginning with the November 20, 1858 arrival of the vessel at Fremantle, Western Australia carrying 82 passengers and 280 convicts, this talk will combine archival research and Arc GIS mapping to reconstruct the many worlds of the Edwin Fox. Emphasizing stories of integration, interactions, and entanglements, this paper describes the ways in which the unique perspective of this single ship can provide to a more intimate understanding of the human agencies and the human costs involved in the most important period of globalization to occur prior to the one we have been experiencing since the 1990s.


17:30 - PUBLIC LECTURE - UWA Music presents: Museum of Sound Series : Seeing is Deceiving: The Non-visual Aspects of Rock Art More Information
Do you remember the sound of dial-up internet? What about the whistle of an old kettle or a wine cork popping? Sounds, noise and music are fundamental to our lives.

Join us to explore our sonic past and present and learn how our lives are shaped by sound and listening. Presented in collaboration with the City of Perth Library.

Sound in the form of language and music make us human. But what is the archaeological evidence for sound? In this talk we will take a global look at sound, music, language, art and human evolution, before focusing on the San or 'Bushman' of southern Africa.

Sven Ouzman is an archaeologist, lecturer and activist at UWA’s School of Social Sciences. Dr Ouzman researches the forgotten worlds beneath and all around us, and is currently exploring areas such as Indigenous rock art in the North Kimberley and the South African colonial circuits of knowledge and heritage. He is a member of the Centre for Rock Art Research and Management at the University of Western Australia.

Free entry - bookings essential

19:30 - PERFORMANCE - UWA Music presents: Main Stage | Impressions Website | More Information
The passion for music and the exceptional ability of young emerging artists creates an extraordinary experience for concertgoers. In 2019, some of Australia’s finest young musicians will take to the stage in four outstanding orchestral and choral concerts, taking you on a musical journey from the 1700s to the present day.

Offering a glimpse of the Baroque era, Elena Kats-Chernin’s expansive and opulent Prelude and Cube is reimagined in this concert where old and new walk side by side. Program

BACH Fantasia and Fugue in C minor (arr. Hunsberger)

ELENA KATS-CHERNIN Prelude and Cube (arr. De Cinque)

ELENA KATS-CHERNIN Dance of the Paper Umbrellas

HAYDN Missa in Angustiis (Nelson Mass)

Tickets from $18

trybooking.com/BASWJ

19:30 - PERFORMANCE - UWA Music presents: Enrich | Broadening Showcase More Information
The vision of the UWA Conservatorium of Music is to enrich all lives with music. Through UWA’s broadening units, all undergraduate students have the opportunity to engage in practical music-making as part of their degree.

Enrich! brings together these students in vibrant and dynamic ensemble performances.

Come and hear the wealth of musical talent on campus.

Join our massed ukulele ensemble as they perform classic songs you know and love! The Broadening Showcase will also feature our handbell ensembles and the UWA Broadening Flute Choir in a fun concert that is sure to delight!

Tickets: $5 (available at the door)
Friday 24
13:00 - PERFORMANCE - UWA Music presents: Free Lunchtime Concert | UWA Composition : The Morricone Project More Information
Be transported from the everyday by our free lunchtime concert series, featuring the best musical talent from within the UWA Conservatorium of Music and around the country.

Ennio Morricone, (b.1928) is an Italian composer, who is most well-known for his film work, and in particular the genre known as ‘spaghetti western’. Working with director Sergio Leone, he scored The Good the Bad and the Ugly, A Fistful of Dollars and For a Few Dollars More. He also wrote the music for Once Upon a time in America The Mission and The Hateful Eight.

The music from the spaghetti western period (the 1960s) demonstrates Morricone’s quirky orchestrations. Budget restrictions meant limited access to a full orchestra. Morricone turned to unconventional instruments (jew’s harp, whistling, electric guitar and cracking whips) to create strange sonic landscapes.

The Morricone Project gives our composition students the opportunity to re-imagine these works for a new ensemble and to collaborate with the musicians in the ensemble. The re-imaginations can included setting Morricone’s music against their own, changing the instrumentation, and/or focusing on one particular motive and exploring its possibilities.

The composers are:

Victor Arul – For a Few Dollars More

Oliver Broun – The Mission

Remal Festini – The Good, The Bad and The Ugly

Lydia Gardiner – The Man with the Harmonica

Free entry, no bookings required.

14:30 - SEMINAR - Anthropology & Sociology Seminar Series : Magali McDuffie – ‘"Jimbinkaboo Yimardoowarra Marninil" - Listening to Nyikina women's voices, from the inside to the outside: Nyikina women's agency in an inter-generational journey of cultural and environmental actions, economic, and self-determination initiatives on Nyikina Country, through film’ More Information
Twelve years of collaboration between three Yimardoowarra Marninil, Nyikina sisters from the Lower Fitzroy River, and French-Australian filmmaker and PhD Scholar, Magali McDuffie, have revealed the Nyikina women’s determination to speak and re-affirm their Nyikina worldview into existence. Their voices, and those of other Kimberley Aboriginal people, demonstrate the strength and continuity of the women’s discourse, despite ever-changing government policies and strategies.

In her PhD thesis, Magali deconstructs the historical and historiographical discourses, anthropological data, legislative policies, development theory, as well as international Indigenous and non-Indigenous literature on agency and development as they relate to the Kimberley region of Western Australia. She investigates the impacts of the colonial state’s development project from colonisation onwards, and describe the Nyikina sisters’ complex interactions with the dominant discourse, bringing to the fore the Nyikina worldview. In privileging Nyikina voices, through film, her study reveals the often hidden flaws of an exclusively market-oriented capitalist economy.

Nyikina women’s voices have become a significant part of a global Indigenous discourse on development alternatives. Their continued agency on the local, national, and international stage, demonstrates the significance of booroo , Country, as a decolonising ground in the context of global development.

In her presentation, Magali will retrace the journey of her PhD thesis, using both film and chapter excerpts to illustrate her findings.

17:30 - PUBLIC TALK - Growing up African in Australia : AfREC Africa Day 2019 public panel discussion and book launch More Information
The theme is “Growing up African in Australia” and will feature an interactive panel discussion and Q&A followed by refreshments and networking. The event also serves as the WA launch of the recently published book by Black Inc. Books Growing up African in Australia. Copies will be available to buy on the night. The event is held in partnership with Black Inc. Books, the UWA African Students Union and the Organisation of African Communities in WA (OAC). We would also like to highlight OAC’s Africa Day 2019 Gala Dinner on 25 May. We hope to see you at both events!

19:30 - PERFORMANCE - UWA Music presents: Enrich | Show Choir & Jazz Spectacular More Information
The vision of the UWA Conservatorium of Music is to enrich all lives with music. Through UWA’s broadening units, all undergraduate students have the opportunity to engage in practical music-making as part of their degree.

Enrich! brings together these students in vibrant and dynamic ensemble performances.

Come and hear the wealth of musical talent on campus.

Under the direction of Tim How, the Show Choir, will be perform songs from Broadway hit Wicked. Whilst the UWA Jazz Ensemble and Advanced Jazz Group, led by Jess Herbert will perform staples of the Jazz repertoire. This fantastic concert is not to be missed!

Tickets: $5 (available at the door)
Monday 27
19:00 - PERFORMANCE - UWA Music presents: Centre Stage | Intercurrent: Walkman Antiquarian : Co-presented by Tura New Music More Information
Artists in residence Intercurrent present contemporary chamber music for piano, percussion, bass clarinet and electronics including Thomas Meadowcroft's Walkman Antiquarian, John Cage's Credo in US, a new work by Perth composer Olivia Davies and more.

Walkman Antiquarian challenges our concept of obsolescence, exploring creative possibilities in the intersection of new and old. Thomas Meadowcroft’s centrepiece work (of the same name) employs much-loved but increasingly historical technologies of sound playback the turntable and the walkman, while John Cage’s Credo in US prominently features the humble transistor radio. Against these are set a modern-day interpretation of 12th Century polyphonist Perotin’s Beata Viscera by Lachlan Skipworth, and a brand new work by West Australian composer Olivia Davies. Intercurrent’s renowned and fiery virtuosity promise a unique and stimulating musical adventure.

Tickets from $10

trybooking.com/BAVKM
Thursday 30
12:00 - SEMINAR - Archaeology Seminar Series : The Reverend Smithies’ Native Schools: experiences of Noongar children in residential schools of the Swan River Colony, 1840-1855 More Information
The Reverend John Smithies arrived in the Swan River Colony in July 1840, and immediately established a residential mission to Noongar children in the centre of Perth. In 1845 the mission moved to Wanneroo, then in 1851 moved again, to York. By 1854 the mission at York housed only two children, and in 1855 was closed by the government, having ‘failed’. Many other church, government, and private institutions were also operating during the period of Smithies’ missions, and a number of Noongar children were moved between these institutions, both around the South West and across the country. Very little is currently known about the identities and life experiences of the Noongar people who were institutionalised in Smithies’ missions, the circumstances that led them there, or their lives after institutionalisation. This research seeks to discover what stories can be told about Noongar people who were associated with Smithies’ missions from the results of historical and archaeological investigation. As well as extensive historical and ethno-historical archival research into the written record relating to these missions, this project aims to survey and excavate at the two former Smithies mission sites still accessible to archaeological investigation; Wanneroo and York. It is hoped this research will contribute to a better understanding of these early missions, and the lives of the people associated with them.

 June 2019
Tuesday 04
18:00 - PUBLIC TALK - The Human Cost of Drone Warfare Website | More Information
A public lecture by Alex Edney-Browne, International Relations, University of Melbourne.

Imagine living under the eerie "bnng" of an armed drone circling overhead. Imagine if that was the sound you heard immediately before the explosion that killed your brother or blasted off your leg. Imagine knowing that people 7000 miles away could see into your homes and watch your family from above. Fear, disappointment, anger and hopelessness are just some of the emotions that Afghan civilians living under drones experience. With military drones fast-proliferating across the world, governments and militaries continue to claim that drones cause minimal harm to civilians and are an effective weapon against terrorism. There are, however, significant effects on civilians' physical and psychological health, ability to socialise and move freely and their cultural customs. Drone warfare’s effectiveness as a counter-terrorism strategy is dubious at best. In this talk, Alex Edney-Browne discusses her findings on the wide-ranging effects of drone warfare from qualitative research in Afghanistan, refugee squats in Greece, and the United States.
Wednesday 05
13:00 - SEMINAR - Postgraduate Showcase: Frontiers in Agriculture Website | More Information
Each year The UWA Institute of Agriculture hosts a postgraduate showcase where some of UWA's top PhD students present their research in agriculture and related areas. Join us for an afternoon of fantastic talks from seven PhD students in the UWA School of Agriculture and Environment, the UWA School of Molecular Sciences, and the UWA Law School, with an introduction by Prof Imelda Whelehan, Dean, Graduate Research School. Afternoon tea and refreshments provided.

18:00 - PUBLIC TALK - The Rise of Militarism in Australia and What We Can Do About it Website | More Information
A public lecture by Margaret Beavis, GP and secretary of the Medical Association for Prevention of War.

In the last few decades there has been an inexorable rise in military themes and influence in Australian society. Anzac Day commemorations have morphed from solemn respectful marches to youth pilgrimages to Gallipoli and an overall romanticisation of the “Anzac spirit” and World War I. Defence spending is being massively ramped up while diplomacy and foreign aid expenditures fall to shameful levels. The influence of weapons companies is pervasive, ranging from partnerships with educational institutions and extensive political lobbying and donations through to government subsidies to support the industry. Australia exports weaponry to Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates, when many other countries have condemned and banned such sales due to the terrible war in Yemen. MAPW works on these issues to bring about policy change.
Thursday 06
18:00 - PUBLIC TALK - Rheumatic Heart Disease: A Case Study Website | More Information
A public lecture by Dr Mark Engel, Associate Professor, Medicine, University of Cape Town and 2019 UWA Institute of Advanced Studies Visiting Fellow.

Elimination of Rheumatic Heart Disease in Africa is a continental priority, given the great morbidity and mortality associated with the disease in most low- and middle-income countries. It is a classic example of a disease that, despite the presence of effective primary and secondary prevention, treatment and rehabilitation methods with successful eradication in high-income countries, continues to wreak a heavy toll on many societies. We recognise that many important determinants of RHD lie outside the health sector, and thus include social determinants in addition to access to primary and tertiary health care resources.

The ASAP Programme (raise Awareness, establish Surveillance systems, Advocate for increased resources for treatment, and to promote Prevention strategies) was launched as a comprehensive approach to tackling RHD on the African continent. Employing a multi-pronged approach, the programme emphasizes the importance of awareness-raising, surveillance, advocacy and prevention programmes being incorporated in research endeavours. Having been instrumental in the programme from its inception in South Africa, Dr Engel will report on the programme’s progress from population screening to genome-wide association studies involving 6000 participants from seven countries in Africa. The lessons learnt serve as an illuminating guide for initiating studies responsive to the health needs and the priorities of the population or community in which it is to be carried out, especially in a resource-constrained environment.
Saturday 08
13:00 - WORKSHOP - UWA Music presents: Keyed Up! Day of Piano More Information
Join us for the annual Keyed Up! Day of Piano where you can learn tips and tricks of piano performance from some of Perth’s most experienced teachers and examiners. Why not ensure that every performance you give is one that you are proud of, whether that be for your University or School assessment, WACE practical or AMEB or other grade exams!

Led by UWA Head of Keyboard and Performance Studies, Graeme Gilling and supported by Perth’s finest pianists, teachers and performance specialists and ideally timed for those students undertaking ATAR Music and AMEB or other grade exams the Keyed Up! Day of Piano is an event not to be missed!

Register to perform and receive feedback from one of our expert panel in an informal workshop setting or just come along and observe students at your own level.

You’ll also have the opportunity to:

Hear performances by UWA Conservatorium of Music students

Explore the Conservatorium’s Historical Instrument collection with a guided session led by Dr Cecilia Sun The skills that you learn at the Keyed Up! Day of Piano will give you the confidence to excel in all your performance endeavours!

$10 Participants - $5 Parents accompanying students/Observers
Monday 10
9:00 - WORKSHOP - Advanced Thinking Skills - 2 Day Workshop : Hosted by The Centre for Exploration Targeting, UWA Website | More Information
The purpose of this workshop is to expose participants to a variety of practical thinking styles and tools to enhance the focus, quality and speed of their thinking. There is a need from university through to the workplace to better understand both basic and advanced thinking processes for better learning, memory, planning and decision making. Your skilled facilitator will combine curated content and self-driven active learning with the impact of group exercises and skill deepening discussions. Thinkercafé workshops maximise potential for gaining practical thinking skills, profound insights and retaining and relating information for your needs. The subject matter for group exercises will be taken from current issues together with specific areas of focus for your industry.

Who Should Attend • Managers, Leaders and Professionals working with teams • Teachers, trainers and academics wishing to enhance outcomes for students • Entrepreneurs and innovators who would like to expand their Thinking Skills • Students from high school to postgraduate level • Anyone seeking lifelong performance improvement

Cost: A$850 per person
Tuesday 11
9:00 - COURSE - A Course in Rasch Measurement Theory : A Course in Rasch Measurement Theory in collaboration with The University of Sydney will take place 11 & 12 July 2019 and 15 - 19 July 2019. More Information
Rasch models for measurement are used in large scale national and international assessments, not only to analyse test data after collection, but to use as criteria for design of test items and their administration. The GSE Psychometric Laboratory undertakes research and development for application to the broad area of measurement and assessment in education and the social sciences including psychology, health and marketing. The GSE Psychometric Laboratory does research in all areas of Rasch models for measurement, in particular epistemological, applied, and in software development. This is an opportunity to study with researchers who have made advancement in all these fields.

Course Structure: The course will be at an intermediate level and consist of two parts: 1. Part I – Thursday 11 to Friday 12 July 2019: Overview of introductory principles of Rasch measurement and the RUMM2030 software. RUM2030 is a very easy to use interactive program that analyses data according to the Rasch measurement model and provides comprehensive diagnostics in both tabular and graphical forms. It can also be used for large scale assessments including vertical equating. 2. Part II - Monday 15 to Friday 19 July 2019: Rasch Measurement Theory. Participants have the option of attending only Part I or II or both parts of the course.

Course registration: Part I (2 days) – AU$950 (Early bird AU$850) Part II (5 days) – AU$2185 (Early bird AU$1960) Part I and II (7 days) – AU$2745 (Early bird AU$2460) https://www.education.uwa.edu.au/ppl/courses/rasch-course

Registrations close 31st May 2019, approximately 10% Discount for Early bird registration - Registration by 31st March 2019. Participants will receive a 15% discount if they enrol in one of the on-line courses after this course.

12:30 - FREE LECTURE - Dean's Distinguised Lecture Series - July : Preserving hearing in children with hepatoblastoma Website | More Information
Over the last few decades there have been spectacular advances in the treatment of hepatoblastoma, the most common malignant liver tumour of childhood, and now most Australian children who develop this disease will be cured. Unfortunately cure often comes at a price, and many children develop severe hearing loss as an adverse effect of one of the drugs used in their treatment. This lecture tells the story of the history of treatment of hepatoblastoma, and recent successes in preventing hearing loss in affected children.

Derek Roebuck recently moved to Perth to take up the position of Professor of Paediatric Radiology at UWA and the Perth Children's Hospital. He previously spent 19 years in England where he worked as a consultant paediatric interventional radiologist and more recently Head of Clinical Service (Radiology) at Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children in London.

18:00 - PUBLIC TALK - Charting courses through the Ice – Envisioning Antarctic Futures Website | More Information
A public lecture by Dr Daniela Liggett, Centre for Antarctic Studies and Research (Gateway Antarctica), University of Canterbury and 2019 UWA Institute of Advanced Studies Visiting Fellow.

A mere few centuries ago, the icy continent to our South was the subject of speculation and imagination. In many ways, Antarctica was beyond the grasp of human understanding – it was an unexplored, unknown land, a terra incognita. In the span of a few hundred years, the Antarctic was discovered, mapped and the surrounding ocean’s resources were exploited – what was terra incognita became terra nullius and later, in anthropologist Jessica O’Reilly’s words a terra clima, with Antarctica not only representing a bellwether for global environmental change but also a hotspot for climate science. The continent’s future is uncertain and once again subject to much speculation.

This presentation, which discusses the results of a collaborative research project, explores four “possibility spaces” within which Antarctic futures might unfold. These are defined by differing interactions between two interdependent variables: the level of human engagement with Antarctica, and the strength of Antarctic governance through the Antarctic Treaty System. Dr Liggett will discuss the many dimensions of anticipated developments in Antarctic governance, tourism and research and identify key drivers behind them and explore four alternate scenarios for Antarctic futures: a collaborative-conservationist, a collaborative-exploitative, an individualistic-conservationist and an individualistic-exploitative scenario. She will argue that the first two require determined efforts to reach, ie a “push”. The other two seem inevitable if lethargy among Antarctic Treaty Parties prevails. Consequently, the Parties will need to ask themselves how they might ‘shape’ the Antarctic future. The answers are likely to affect the rest of the world.

19:30 - EVENT - “Politics and the Novel” by Susan Midalia : Friends of the Library Talk More Information
Members: Free, Guests: $5 donation

The nineteenth-century French writer Stendhal famously observed that “politics in a literary work is like a gun shot in the middle of a concert: it’s something vulgar and coarse, which is also impossible to ignore.” Stendhal’s analogy posits the traditional model of literature as the realm of the aesthetic, expressive of beauty and universal moral truths, and which is regarded as superior to the grubby realm of “politics” – loosely defined here as pertaining to issues of power and human rights. This model naively presupposes the existence of non-political literature – as if it’s possible for any writing to exist in an ideology-free zone. Nevertheless, Stendhal’s comment also rightly highlights the challenge for a creative writer intent on exploring overtly political issues: how to avoid being “vulgar and coarse”; that is, ideologically dogmatic or morally self-righteous; how not to insult the intelligence of the reader, regardless of their political beliefs. This presentation will consider the creative strategies used in my political novel The Art of Persuasion in order avoid those pitfalls: the use of the romance genre to explore love as moral concept in our hyper-sexualised culture; and the use of wit or intelligent humour to raise questions about the crucial political issues of asylum seekers and climate change. I pay particular attention to my novel’s allusions to the fiction of Jane Austen, and its adherence to the Horatian dictum that writing should both delight and instruct. My novel The Art of Persuasion aims to give readers aesthetic delight – the pleasures of language and story – in order to encourage reflection on the issues that matter to me as a writer and a member of civil society.

Dr Susan Midalia has studied at Cambridge University and the University of Western Australia, where she completed a PhD in contemporary Australian women’s fiction. She has published in national and international literary journals, and taught in secondary and tertiary institutions for many years. Since becoming a full-time writer in 2006, she has published three collections of short stories, all of them shortlisted for major national literary awards: A History of the Beanbag (2007), An Unknown Sky (2012), and Feet to the Stars (2015). Her debut novel The Art of Persuasion was published in 2018, and her second novel has recently been accepted for publication.

Special Collections

The current display in the Special Collections foyer of donations by the Friends of the Library features maps showing the Dutch interest in the Indian Ocean region. These maps include copies of Polus Antarcticus by Jansson 1650, Frederick de Wit’s Orientaliora Indiarum Orientalium 1680, Mare del Sud 1765 by Zatta and Abraham Ortelius’ 1574 Indiae orientalis insvlarvmqve adiacientivm typvs.

The Friends of the Library have recently donated a facsimile copy of the Barcelona Haggadah to Special Collections. The illuminated Hebrew manuscript dates from the fourteenth century and contains the Haggadah, Laws for Passover, piyyutim and Torah readings for the festival of Passover according to the Spanish rite. The purchase of the facsimile was supported by Assoc/Prof Suzanne Wijsman (Chair of Strings Conservatorium of Music) for her research as the manuscript contains illustrations of musical instruments. Special Collections will next be open on Tuesday 11th June from 6.30pm – 7.15pm for members to view the Barcelona Haggadah.

RSVP: Kathryn Maingard – [email protected] or 08 6488 2356 https://www.eventbrite.com.au/e/politics-and-the-novel-tickets-62182092312

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