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Today's date is Sunday, September 20, 2020
Events for the public
 September 2018
Thursday 20
9:30 - STAFF EVENT - Unit Design Workshop (20/09/2018) Website | More Information
Facilitated by experienced Learning Designers, this one-day workshop is a great practical opportunity for new and current teaching staff at UWA to experience the unit design process.

You and your colleagues can participate in a number of sequential collaborative tasks which will allow you to explore ideas for student-centred learning as well as map out and plan the face-to-face and online elements for the unit you want to specifically focus on for this workshop.

The workshop begins at 9:30am sharp and finishes at 4:30pm. There is an expectation that participants will be present for the full day. Please answer as many of the questions at the point of registration. This extremely valuable information will be used to coordinate the best team to assist you at this workshop and during follow-up opportunities.

Tea, coffee and a light lunch will be provided.

To get the most out of this workshop we highly recommend the following:

A Unit Coordinator for the unit must attend. Unit Coordinators are encouraged to invite as many of their unit team members as possible. Please ensure all participants register. Unit Coordinators must bring agreed unit learning outcomes and the current unit outline of the chosen unit. It is important to bring your own laptop or mobile device for online development.
Friday 21
11:00 - SEMINAR - Linguistics Seminar Series : Expansion and modification of the lexicon of Yuwaalaraay Gamilaraay (NSW) in language revitalization. More Information
Yuwaalaraay Gamilaraay are two languages from the north-centre of New South Wales and adjacent Queensland. Only a few words and phrases from these languages were regularly being used in the 1990s, when major reclamation efforts began. There has been a major expansion of use since then, albeit of relatively simple language.

One challenge has been finding language for domains in which people want to use it. Two of the most common are greetings and ceremonial and official events. This has involved lexical development. At the same time efforts have continued to better describe traditional elements of the languages so that these can also be used in the reclaimed language.

I will consider some recently developed words found in the dictionary supplement (the Gamilaraay Yuwaalaraay Dictionary was published in 2003) and words whose use has been expanded. I will also consider the implications of ongoing grammatical and semantic analysis, and the potential for this to modify the current version of reclaimed Yuwaalaraay Gamilaraay. The practicalities of such work, including consultation and dissemination of the work, are also discussed.

14:30 - SEMINAR - Anthropology / Sociology Seminar Series : Practicing Autonomy in a Local Eduscape: Schools, Families and Choice More Information
In 1987 the Western Australian State Government released a policy document titled Better Schools in Western Australia: A Programme for Improvement in which it was contended that ‘Whereas once it was believed that a good system creates good schools, it is now recognised that good schools make a good system’ (Ministry of Education 1987:5). In line with the devolutionary thinking it reflected, Better School’s advocated school-based decision-making as a means of being more responsive to local community needs and enabling schools to better meet the educational requirements of individual students (Ministry of Education 1987:5). As was the case in many parts of the Western World, devolutionary reform was part of a broader policy regime opening up possibilities for individual choice, shifting responsibility for outcomes in key systems to individual units of organisation and the so-called “clients” of these organisations, transforming the modern citizen as ‘an active agent in his or her government’, as Rose (1993) puts it. Neoliberalism is often evoked as an umbrella term to capture the socio-political ideals underpinning these changes in social policy. It is also helpful to place this policy formation under a broader cultural canopy pointing to a trend away from broad communal activity to more individualised practices – reflexive, “second modernity” as some commentators refer to it.

This paper will consider the interweaving of schools and families as the individuals within each institution articulate and enact their various desires and needs. Embracing a Bourdieusian commitment to understanding social action as a practice driven by cultured, structured agency, I draw upon various forms of data accumulated over nearly two decades of research in and around schools, alongside some recent developments in the local political arena, to analyse the social effects and implications of the practice of school choice and “independent government schools” in Western Australia. The focal points shift from families to localised fieldsites and further afield into regional and state-wide events and trends to contemplate the ways in which the allure of choice and autonomy implicate many a citizen and agent of the state in unequal systems that do not necessarily address the problems they are aimed at ameliorating. In other words, good schools and empowered parents do not necessarily make good systems.
Tuesday 25
8:30 - CONFERENCE - The National Indigenous Legal Conference 2018 Website | More Information
School of Indigenous Studies hosts this year’s National Indigenous Legal Conference in partnership with UWA Law School, Notre Dame Law School and the Aboriginal Legal Service of Western Australia.

The conference will attract around 150 delegates from the legal profession and will feature prominent keynote speakers from the Indigenous legal community to discuss current and emerging Indigenous legal rights issues.

The theme of this year’s conference is, Sovereign Laws, Peoples and Voices’, and it will examine amongst other topics:

Indigenous sovereignty under international law

Constitutional reform

The Uluru Statement from the Heart

Domestic sovereignty and self-determination claims

Native Title Bodies Corporate (prescribed body corporates and registered native title body corporates) across the Kimberley

Criminal justice issues, challenges and opportunities; the Aboriginal Legal Service of Western Australia.

Delegates at the conference will have the opportunity to hear a range of speakers including the Honourable Robert French AC, Professor Megan Davis, Professor Irene Watson and Adjunct Professor Dennis Eggington.

To register visit: www.nilc2018.com.au

9:30 - STAFF EVENT - Unit Design Workshop (25/09/2018) Website | More Information
Facilitated by experienced Learning Designers, this one-day workshop is a great practical opportunity for new and current teaching staff at UWA to experience the unit design process.

You and your colleagues can participate in a number of sequential collaborative tasks which will allow you to explore ideas for student-centred learning as well as map out and plan the face-to-face and online elements for the unit you want to specifically focus on for this workshop.

The workshop begins at 9:30am sharp and finishes at 4:30pm. There is an expectation that participants will be present for the full day. Please answer as many of the questions at the point of registration. This extremely valuable information will be used to coordinate the best team to assist you at this workshop and during follow-up opportunities.

Tea, coffee and a light lunch will be provided.

To get the most out of this workshop we highly recommend the following:

A Unit Coordinator for the unit must attend. Unit Coordinators are encouraged to invite as many of their unit team members as possible. Please ensure all participants register. Unit Coordinators must bring agreed unit learning outcomes and the current unit outline of the chosen unit. It is important to bring your own laptop or mobile device for online development.

13:00 - EVENT - Political Science and International Relations : Getting past the 'warrior mind-set': Defining a unique institutional teleology for the military More Information
In her recent book, Rosa Brooks concludes that as the tasks being assigned to the military expand, it has become more difficult to define and limit its institutional role. This paper examines ways to understand the teleology of the military as a social institution (i.e. the institutional purpose or ends for which it exists). First, I examine the view that the purpose of the military is to “kill people and break things.” I demonstrate that this “warrior mindset” is inadequate for defining the ends of the modern military, which is more than a mere instrument for doing harm or fighting wars. Next, I critique an approach that says the teleology of the military is to carry out the state’s responsibility for defending the “life” of a political community from external threats. I then contrast this approach with a cosmopolitan perspective that argues that the moral purpose of the military should be to protect human rights. I conclude that a morally responsible state should use its military to defend the common good. This means that a state’s military should defend the common good of the political community it serves. This includes, but is not limited to, fighting wars against external aggression. But it also means that a state has important moral responsibilities to the common good outside the interests of its own narrowly defined political community. Importantly, it has a moral obligation, albeit weakened by various key factors, to use military force to protect the lives of outsiders.
Thursday 27
9:30 - STAFF EVENT - Unit Design Workshop (27/09/2018) Website | More Information
Facilitated by experienced Learning Designers, this one-day workshop is a great practical opportunity for new and current teaching staff at UWA to experience the unit design process.

You and your colleagues can participate in a number of sequential collaborative tasks which will allow you to explore ideas for student-centred learning as well as map out and plan the face-to-face and online elements for the unit you want to specifically focus on for this workshop.

The workshop begins at 9:30am sharp and finishes at 4:30pm. There is an expectation that participants will be present for the full day. Please answer as many of the questions at the point of registration. This extremely valuable information will be used to coordinate the best team to assist you at this workshop and during follow-up opportunities.

Tea, coffee and a light lunch will be provided.

To get the most out of this workshop we highly recommend the following:

A Unit Coordinator for the unit must attend. Unit Coordinators are encouraged to invite as many of their unit team members as possible. Please ensure all participants register. Unit Coordinators must bring agreed unit learning outcomes and the current unit outline of the chosen unit. It is important to bring your own laptop or mobile device for online development.

18:00 - PUBLIC TALK - Gillian Triggs on 'Speaking Up' Website | More Information
The City of Perth Library, UWA Institute of Advanced Studies and Boffins Books, are delighted to present Gillian Triggs on 'Speaking Up'.

As president of the Human Rights Commission, Gillian Triggs advocated for the disempowered, the disenfranchised, the marginalised. She withstood relentless political pressure and media scrutiny as she defended the defenceless for five tumultuous years. How did this aspiring ballet dancer, dignified daughter of a tank commander and eminent law academic respond when appreciative passengers on a full airplane departing Canberra greeted her with a round of applause? Her book 'Speaking Up' shares with readers the values that have guided Triggs' convictions and the causes she has championed. She dares women to be a little vulgar and men to move beyond their comfort zones to achieve equity for all. And she will not rest until Australia has a Bill of Rights. Triggs' passionate memoir is an irresistible call to everyone who yearns for a fairer world.

Professor Gillian Triggs served as President of the Australian Human Rights Commission from 2012 to 2017. She has held many significant academic positions, including director of the British Institute for International and Comparative Law and dean of the Faculty of Law at the University of Sydney. She is currently a Vice-Chancellor's Fellow at the University of Melbourne and Chair of Justice Connect.

Please note that ticket purchases for this event are made on the Boffins Books website.

Tickets: $15

 October 2018
Tuesday 02
18:00 - PUBLIC TALK - Where did language come from? Website | More Information
A public lecture by Michael Corballis, Emeritus Professor of Psychology, University of Auckland.

From the Bible to Chomsky, language is a miracle, unique to humans, and emerging as a single event, initially in a single individual, within the past 100,000 years.

In this lecture, Professor Corballis will argue instead for a Darwinian approach. Language evolved primarily to allow our species, and its forebears, to communicate about the nonpresent and share mental travels in space and time. Mental time travel itself goes far back in evolution, and our capacity to communicate about it emerged through gesture and pantomime, gradually refining into the miniaturized form of gesture that we call speech.

Michael Corballis is Emeritus Professor of Psychology at the University of Auckland. He was born and educated in New Zealand, then obtained his PhD from McGill University in Montreal, Canada, where he taught for some years before returning to Auckland. In 2016 he received the Rutherford Medal of the Royal Society of New Zealand for his work on brain asymmetry, language evolution, and mental time travel. His latest book is 'The Truth about Language', published by University of Chicago Press in 2017.

18:30 - FREE LECTURE - UWA Music presents: The 2018 Callaway Lecture with David Elliott : What is music, and what is education? More Information
The Callaway Lecture is one of the most prestigious events in the calendar of the Conservatorium of Music. In collaboration with the Kodály National Conference, we are delighted to welcome Professor David Elliott, author of ‘Music Matters: A Philosophy of Music Education’ and Professor of Music and Music Education at New York University, to present the 2018 Callaway Lecture.

David, who is a leading figure in the area of music education philosophy will present a lecture entitled:

What is music, and what is education? Philosophical exploration of music and musical values, and how this relates to education.

Please join us for refreshments from 630pm. The lecture will commence at 7pm.

Entry is free - RSVP to [email protected]
Thursday 04
16:00 - SEMINAR - Archaeology Seminar : DNA of the invisible: A genetic approach to study past interactions of people and fauna More Information
When our ancestors migrated out of Africa 100,000 years ago, a highly perfected killing machine was unleashed on the rest of the world, catching the local fauna off-guard. Wherever we travelled since then, we left a trail of destruction behind us: species have gone extinct on every continent that we invaded, from the wholly rhino in Europe to the giant wombat (Diprotodon) in Australia. But, even though pre-historic extinctions have a strange tendency to coincide with human arrival, there is a lack of solid evidence demonstrating exactly when, and how, humans caused animals to die out in the past, because of the eons of time passed since it happened. In particular, the highly fragmented nature of many zoo-archaeological bone assemblages pose a challenge in the interpretation of past interactions between people and fauna. My PhD project explores an alternative approach to study faunal remains found at archaeological sites. By sequencing DNA from less valuable material, such as sediment or highly fragmented bone remains, we analyse the species composition in three study areas: Greenland, New Zealand and Texas. We found that certain species tend to be missed by traditional approaches. For example whale species were detected at surprisingly high quantities in Greenland and in New Zealand. Furthermore, in New Zealand, we were able to describe the decline in genetic diversity that occurred in the native kākāpō population after human arrival 750 years ago. Lastly, in Texas, we detected a sudden drop in biodiversity for both flora and fauna at the onset of the Younger Dryas 12,900 years ago. But, while plant diversity recovered when temperatures rose again, animal diversity did not, suggesting that something other than climate change was to blame for the loss of faunal diversity in North America…

18:00 - PUBLIC TALK - A Scandalous Empire : The 2018 Fred Alexander Lecture by Professor Kirsten McKenzie Website | More Information
The 2018 Fred Alexander Lecture by Kirsten McKenzie, Professor of History, University of Sydney.

A serial imposter swindles his way through the colony of New South Wales claiming to be a British lord. An activist lawyer is lauded for exposing illegal slave dealing – until he is revealed as an escaped convict in disguise. The mysterious pregnancy of an unmarried young woman transforms into a debate about colonial constitutions. The official commissions of enquiry sent out to investigate the British empire in the wake of the Napoleonic Wars never dismissed such stories as unimportant local gossip. Scandals, they knew well, were part of the mesh of people, power and information that bound the empire together. Can historians use them in the same way?

In this lecture Professor Kirsten McKenzie reflects on two decades of her own investigations into empire. In so doing, she considers the role that seemingly marginal characters, and ostensibly trivial disputes, might play in much larger forces of social change. Just as scandals today tell us about the world we live in, so the often-forgotten scandals of colonial societies can reveal the texture and drama of their past.

Kirsten McKenzie is a Fellow of the Australian Academy of the Humanities and Professor of History at the University of Sydney, where she has been based since 2002. As a Rhodes Scholar from Cape Town, South Africa, she completed her D.Phil at Magdalen College, Oxford in 1997. She is the author of 'Scandal in the Colonies: Sydney and Cape Town, 1820 – 1850' (Melbourne University Publishing, 2004), 'A Swindler’s Progress: Nobles and Convicts in the Age of Liberty' (University of New South Wales Press and Harvard University Press, 2009/2010) and 'Imperial Underworld: An Escaped Convict and the Transformation of the British Colonial Order' (Cambridge University Press, 2016). She was awarded the Crawford Medal by the Australian Academy of the Humanities in 2004. 'A Swindler’s Progress' was shortlisted for the Prime Minister’s Prize for Australian History, 2011 and the Nettie Palmer Prize for Non-Fiction, Victorian Premier’s Literary Awards, 2010.

Professor McKenzie is the 2018 UWA Fred Alexander Fellow.

The Fred Alexander Fellowship is dedicated to the memory of Professor Fred Alexander (1899-1996), the founding Head of the History Discipline (then Department) at The University of Western Australia.
Friday 05
11:00 - SEMINAR - Asian Studies Seminar : “How do you think learning Korean will shape your future?" A Q methodology study into university student’s future language selves. More Information
Being able to speak a foreign language is often considered a valuable skill for university students, and to make foreign language learning at the university level more relevant to student’s future careers it is important to understand what learners want to do with the language and how they see themselves as future speakers of a foreign language. This talk presents the results of a survey on student’s future L2 selves, conducted on learners of Korean using Q methodology, a qualitative/quantitative mixed research method. Q methodology, often defined as an inverted factor analysis, it is used for the investigation of subjectivity; however its application to the field of language education has been extremely limited and restricted to students of English as a foreign language. The potentiality of Q-methodology for research in the field of foreign language learning is worth more exploration since it is a promising technique for the investigation of student’s individual differences, among them mainly learner’s motivation. In this presentation, after an outline of Q methodology, I will show how its application to the study of future L2 selves in a cohort of Korean language students highlighted the presence of four main types of students, each with a clearly defined future perspective on how they see themselves in the future as speakers of Korean as a second language. These results are further discussed with reference to other foreign languages and to foreign language teaching at the tertiary level.

11:00 - SEMINAR - Linguistics Seminar Series : Reference and the dynamics of discourse: The expanding function of null subjects in Kriol More Information
Kriol is an English-lexified creole spoken throughout the northern regions of Australia. Relatively little is known about the structural features of the language, and a comprehensive description of the language is yet to be produced. In this talk I will present the research I have undertaken as part of my Honours year, which is a description and analysis of the expanding functions of null subjects in Kriol.

My description of null subjects will first distinguish between two broad categories: null subjects which are conditioned by syntactic constraints, and those that are conditioned by discourse constraints. I will then describe the specific environments these types of null subjects are located in and conclude that the two varieties of null subjects fundamentally differ in whether or not they are licensed through syntactic control in antecedent-anaphor relations. This description will then be followed by a quantitative analysis of null subjects constrained by discourse level factors, where I will demonstrate that null subjects that appear as discourse markers are licensed when they encode continued, non-ambiguous topics that occur episode medially or finally.

My presentation will then conclude by suggesting that this variation in the function of null subjects represents an apparent change in progress of null subjects expanding from syntactic to discourse environments, motivated by influence from Australian languages. In this discussion I will consider lexifier and substrate influences, as well as typological parallels in the function of null subjects in other Australian contact varieties.

14:30 - SEMINAR - ANTHROPOLOGY / SOCIOLOGY SEMINAR : Desiring the Modern Boy: Beauty, Modernity and Masculinity in Interwar Japan More Information
This paper problematises the visual representation of the Modern Boy (mobo) in 1920s Japanese popular media as a site of contestation over what constituted desirable masculinity in early twentieth-century Japanese society. On the one hand, the mobo’s image as a beautiful commodified male points to a renegotiation of masculinity in the direction of a new gender-blurring beauty aesthetic and a subversive contestation of the more normative masculinities of the salaryman and soldier. On the other hand, under the disapproving gaze of the state and social critics, the mobo was also constructed as a parodic, emasculated form of masculinity that reinforced the hegemonic masculine ideal by providing its masculine “Other”. Interrogating the tensions involved in viewing and desiring the mobo therefore contributes to our understanding of how beauty practices feature in the project of creating the new modern man in interwar Japan and the concurrent representational strategies that work to diffuse threats to hegemonic masculinity.

18:00 - PUBLIC TALK - Happily Single? It May Depend on Where You Live: how families shape single women’s well-being in three East Asian cities Website | More Information
A public lecture by Lynne Nakano, Professor, Japanese Studies, The Chinese University of Hong Kong and 2018 UWA Institute of Advanced Studies Visiting Fellow.

The age of first marriage has been rising around the world but nowhere more rapidly than in East Asia. In contrast to patterns of near universal marriage only a generation ago in many East Asian societies, increasing numbers of women in East Asia’s cities are single into middle-age and beyond. In Tokyo, for example, nearly 40 percent of women between the ages of 30 and 34 have never been married. In Tokyo, Hong Kong, and Shanghai marriage is a key symbol of status and security; marriage is the ideal lifestyle and most women say that they want to marry regardless of their sexual orientation. Yet single women say they have difficulty finding an appropriate person to marry. In spite of the many similarities in the experiences of single women across East Asian cities, we also find striking differences. In Hong Kong remaining single is understood to be an acceptable lifestyle choice. In Tokyo, singlehood is acceptable but not ideal. In Shanghai, many women feel that remaining single is not an acceptable lifestyle choice and experience intense pressure to marry.

This talk will examine why the experience of singlehood differs in the three cities of Hong Kong, Shanghai and Tokyo. Professor Nakano will argue that as the state has stepped back from control over the intimate spaces of family life, families have become the primary medium through which singlehood is encouraged and supported as well as discouraged and curbed. In contrast to arguments that the rise of singlehood in Asia reflects growing individualism, she will argue that family structures and values powerfully shape single women’s happiness, well-being and sources of meaning in the three cities under study.

This lecture is presented by UWA’s Institute for Advanced Studies, the ARC Centre for the History of Emotions and the Forrest Foundation and is part of a suite of events, including the symposium 'Emotions and Intimacy in Asian Migration, Past and Present' on Friday 23 November 2018.
Monday 08
8:00 - CONFERENCE - In The Zone Above: The Indo-Pacific Era in Space Conference 2018 : As the investment centre of gravity related to space shifts towards leading economies in the Indo-Pacific, we must think together about shared opportunities, challenges and risks around the 'Zone Above'. This year's In The Zone Conference will focus on the Indo-Pacific era in space and the opportunities and challenges ahead of us. Website | More Information
Tuesday 09
13:00 - SEMINAR - Political Science and International Relations : The Nation and The Nature; The Power and Practice of Assembling Military Environmentalism on the Borders of India. More Information
This paper empirically examines and debates the specific governmental intervention of military environmentalism that set out to improve and protect the disputed Himalayan borders of India. Through employing the analytic of assemblage to study military environmentalism, the paper focuses upon the typology of six practices namely: forging alignments; rendering technical; authorising knowledge; managing failures and contradictions; anti-politics and reassembling to determine the power of discourses, institutions, procedures, tactics and subject positions that makes up any governmental intervention. Based upon a long-term fieldwork, it examines the practice of paramilitary Indo-Tibetan Border Police’s wildlife conservation initiatives inside the Changthang Wildlife Sanctuary that brings together an array of actors (pastoralists, state conservation officials, biologists, activists, politicians and the border militaries) and objectives (livelihoods, control, authority, sustainability and security). It demonstrates how military environmentalism is assembled and sustained in the midst of mounting army force deployments and an operational readiness of India to go on a war with China. Moving away from resolving the moral questions connected to such an assemblage, the paper highlights how military environmentalism is a matter of fragile relays, contested locales and fissiparous affiliations and is not a governmental rationality that extends unproblematically to take forward its promise of improvement.

16:00 - EVENT - Postgraduate Opportunities: Arts Q&A + networking : Join us for Q&A session followed by networking with academics. Website | More Information
Discover more about your postgraduate study options in Arts, Business, Law and Education and have all your questions answered.

Postgraduate qualifications have become an expectation in a global workforce and can be the defining factor in your future career pathway. Find out how you can have a rewarding career and contribute to solving some of the world’s greatest challenges.

Join us for Q&A session followed by networking with academics. This event is in collaboration with the Arts Union.

Related Courses:

- Master of International Relations

- Master of Social Research Methods

- Master of Forensic Anthropology

- Master of International Development

- Master of Heritage Studies

- Master of Public Policy

- Master of Strategic Communications

- Master of Teaching (Early Childhood)

- Master of Teaching (Primary)

- Master of Teaching (Secondary)

- HASS Curriculum

- Master of Asian Studies

Other events in the Postgraduate Opportunities series:

School of Design information session

STEM: Expo + networking

Juris Doctor: Q&A session

Global Professional Sundowner

17:00 - PUBLIC LECTURE - Blasphemy and Islam More Information
Blasphemy and Islam

by Sajid Hameed, Research Fellow, Al-Mawrid Global

Blasphemy is a long-standing issue of debate across cultures. However, in 2005, when a Danish newspaper published cartoons depicting the Prophet Muhammad, the topic became a major global controversy. What does Islam say about blasphemy? What is Islam’s stand on freedom of expression? Sajid Hameed’s lecture will focus on issues of freedom of expression and blashpemy with specific respect to Islam.



About Sajid Hameed

Mr Sajid Hameed is an Islamic scholar and Research Fellow, Al-Mawrid Global. He is also the Director of the Directorate of Education, Al-Mawrid Global. Mr Hameed is a member of the Editorial Board of the Quarterly “Ijtihad” Organ of cii.gov.pk. He is currently conducting doctoral research on the topic of Islamic Thought and Civilization. His previous research was on the concept of certitude and probability, in Muslim thought.

Entry: Free but please RSVP via [email protected] For more information: Azim Zahir, Research Assistant, CMSS, 0417800303

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