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Today's date is Wednesday, December 02, 2020
Psychology
 September 2019
Tuesday 03
13:00 - SEMINAR - School of Human Sciences Seminar Series : Age-related pathway signatures – relevance for treating ageing disorders Website | More Information
Abstract: Ageing occurs in a regulated manner and the associated gene expression changes could contribute to the onset of many diseases, either by creating a permissive environment for pathology, or by directly inducing these conditions. We identified an Age-related Gene Expression Signature (AGES) in rats, by studying a time course of gene expression throughout the lifespan of the animal. Examining multiple tissues in rats aged 6, 9, 12, 18, 21, 24 and 27 months, we demonstrated tissue-specific and common gene pathway changes. Since AGES were shared by multiple tissues, it is plausible that perturbation of a discrete cell signalling pathway can extend life span and delay age-related diseases. We next asked, what is the impact of clinically-relevant low doses of rapalog on age-related pathway changes? Rapamycin or rapalogs (e.g. RAD001) that are inhibitors of mTORC1 (mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1), have been shown to increase lifespan and forestall age-related phenotypes in multiple species, including humans. Interestingly, the effect of RAD001 on age-related gene pathways was more pronounced in kidneys compared with other examined tissues (liver, skeletal muscle and hippocampus). The majority of the age-related pathways in the kidney were counter-regulated by a low dose of RAD001, and this was accompanied by reduction of age-related renal histopathology. We also examined the impact of RAD001 on molecular pathways implicated in skeletal muscle ageing (sarcopenia). This partial inhibition of the mTORC1 pathway counteracted age-related changes in expression of several genes related to senescence, muscle atrophy and deterioration of neuromuscular junctions, plus prevented loss of muscle mass for select muscles. These studies emphasise the potential benefit of drugs that target global signalling pathways as a successful strategy to reduce the adverse consequences of ageing.

18:00 - PUBLIC TALK - The Art Of Healing Website | More Information
The 2019 Robin Winkler Lecture by Helen Milroy, Professor of Psychiatry at The University of Western Australia.

Indigenous mental health is an area of major concern in Australia. In this talk, Professor Milroy will consider the historical, cultural, and contemporary issues facing Indigenous peoples in regard to mental health and wellbeing and what may be required for a healing approach to be effective. The talk will provide a framework for understanding the components of healthy communities through a healing and community life development approach. Her presentation will explore major themes relating to the trauma that has occurred as a consequence of colonisation over many generations and continues to be experienced in the present, including the themes of powerlessness, disconnection, and helplessness. In turn, the talk will highlight pathways to recovery that are centred on self-determination and community governance, reconnection and community life, as well as restoration and community resilience. Professor Milroy will argue that acknowledgement of Aboriginal worldviews, developing a comprehensive, holistic approach that focuses on individual, family, and community strengths, whilst at the same time addressing the needs of the community, provides both a more culturally acceptable and effective approach to addressing these issues.

Helen Milroy is a descendant of the Palyku people of the Pilbara region of Western Australia but was born and educated in Perth. Currently she is a Consultant Child and Adolescent Psychiatrist, Professor at The University of Western Australia and Commissioner with the National Mental Health Commission. Helen has been on state and national mental health and research advisory committees and boards with a particular focus on Indigenous mental health as well as the wellbeing of children. From 2013-2017 Helen was a Commissioner for the Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse. In 2019, she was appointed as a Commissioner with the Australian Football League.

The Robin Winkler Lecture

This annual public lecture commemorates the work of Robin Winkler, a highly influential teacher and researcher at the UWA School of Psychological Science, whose work was guided by humanitarian values and a relentless questioning of accepted orthodoxies. He was a community psychologist and passionate advocate of the importance of equal access to psychological services, and of recognition of the social context in which treatment and research is being undertaken. He died at the age of 43 while heading the UWA Clinical Master’s program at the Psychology Clinic, which he established and which now bears his name. In the Oxford Handbook of the History of Psychology he is described as “a singular, crusading figure” in Australian psychology.
Friday 06
8:35 - STAFF EVENT - Free Staff Health Assessment : For staff with clinical issues eg Sedentary, overweight, diabetes, physical function or musculoskeletal issues More Information
Thursday 12
8:30 - SYMPOSIUM - SWAN2019 : Symposium of WA Neuroscience 2019 Website | More Information
The Symposium of WA Neuroscience 2019 (SWAN 2019) will be held on Thursday the 12th of September, at the Perkins Medical Research Institute. Registration is free at bit.ly/2019swanreg, closing 29th of August, and abstract submission via bit.ly/2019swanabstract closes on the 15th of August.

SWAN 2019 will be a showcase for neuroscience research, with a particular focus on students and early career researchers. The meeting will feature selected national speakers and speaking opportunities for early career researchers and PhD and Honours students. Poster presentations will be welcome from all researchers.

There will be themed sessions with keynote speakers including: Neurodegeneration - Prof Roberto Cappai, The University of Melbourne. Cognitive aging – Prof Sharon Naismith, The University of Sydney. Sensory Neuroscience - Prof Gary Housley, The University of New South Wales. Clinical neuroscience – Ms Michelle Harris-Allsop, Dementia Consultant, Care Partnerships Australia

The Symposium will close with a Sundowner and the awarding of cash prizes for winning student and ECR oral and poster presentations. We look forward to welcoming you to SWAN 2019.
Tuesday 24
13:00 - FREE LECTURE - Special Guest Lectures and Panel Discussion : Inactivity, Exercise and Cardiovascular System Website | More Information
"Vascular effects of physical (in)activity and insulin resistance: Mechanisms and implications" - Dr. Jaume Padilla is currently an Associate Professor in the Department of Nutrition and Exercise Physiology and investigator at the Dalton Cardiovascular Research Center at the University of Missouri. His laboratory focuses on understanding the physiological and molecular mechanisms by which inactivity, obesity, and type 2 diabetes lead to an increased risk for vascular dysfunction and disease. Dr. Padilla’s research is integrative and incorporates in vitro cell and tissue culture models and studies in mice, pigs, and human patients, thus highlighting the translational nature of his work. His seminar will summarize some of his recent work related to mechanisms contributing to vascular insulin resistance and dysfunction in obesity and type 2 diabetes as well as describe the deleterious vascular consequences of excess inactivity and sitting.

"Training your arteries, vascular function with exercise training in healthy and clinical populations" - Maureen J MacDonald received her Honours BSc in Chemistry from Acadia University, Canada, in 1991 and her MSc (1993) and PhD (1998) in Kinesiology from the University of Waterloo, Canada. After post-doctoral research fellowships at the University of British Columbia and the University of Western Ontario she started her academic career as a faculty member at Wilfrid Laurier University. Since 2000 she has been a faculty member in the Department of Kinesiology at McMaster University, Hamilton, Canada, where she is a full professor and is the Dean of Science. Dr. MacDonald the director of the Vascular Dynamics Laboratory and is an active member of the Exercise Metabolism Research Group in the Department of Kinesiology at McMaster. Her research interests are in the area of exercise physiology with specialization in the application of ultrasound techniques to the assessment of the peripheral blood vessels. Most recently, together with her research team, she has been examining the impact of high intensity interval training on the blood vessels and heart in individuals with coronary artery disease and the use of heat therapy as an alternative to exercise training. She has directly supervised over 100 undergraduate and graduate students since her appointment in 2000 and was recently awarded the Canadian Society for Exercise Physiology Mentorship award in October 2018. Dr. MacDonald has been continually funded by The Natural Sciences and Engineering Council of Canada since 2001, and currently is also funded by Canadian Institutes for Health Research and the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada. Dr. MacDonald is a member of the Canadian Society for Exercise Physiology, the American College of Sports Medicine, the American Physiological Society and the European College of Sports Science and. Two research leaves at Stanford University (July 2006-June 2007) and Loughborough University (July 2013-June 2014) provided Dr. MacDonald with international academic exposure and fostered lasting international research collaborations. She teaches a weekly high intensity interval training spinning class in the McMaster Fitness Facility and spends most of her free time at the arena watching her boys play hockey.

Panel Discussion 2:00-2:30 with Professor David Dunstan PhD David is Head of the Physical Activity laboratory at the Baker Heart and Diabetes Institute in Melbourne and is an NHMRC Senior Research Fellow and Baker Fellow. He also holds the position of Professor within the Behaviour, Environment and Cognition Research Program at the Mary MacKillop Institute for Health Research, Australian Catholic University. His research program encompasses the interdisciplinary cross-talk and integration of observational, experimental, mechanistic and intervention evidence on the role of sedentary behaviour and physical activity in the prevention and management of chronic diseases. He has published over 260 peer reviewed papers and in 2018 was included in the Clarivate list of the 1% of the most highly cited researchers globally. Over the past 15 years David has had extensive media interest in his research including interviews with National Public Radio, Wall Street Journal, CNN, The Economist, New Scientist, the New York Times and the LA Times.
Wednesday 25
13:00 - SEMINAR - Using genes to assess social structure in the Boodies of Barrow Island : School of Human Sciences Seminar Series Website | More Information
The Boodie or Burrowing Bettong (Bettongia lesueur) is the only macropod that shelters underground in warrens. It is limited naturally to three islands off the west Australian coast, but just 200 years ago it had the widest distribution of any macropod, occupying about 50% of the continent. The seminar will describe what can be eked out of a genetic analysis of the population on Barrow Island, which is at the geographic centre of Australia's largest resource project. Inevitably, it will be short. However, that masks the huge effort required to undertake work of this kind. It was largely undertaken by others, and Felicity Donaldson and Celeste Wale deserve special mention in this regard.

 November 2019
Wednesday 06
12:00 - COURSE - Responding to Disclosures of Sexual Violence Online Course : A free, online course for UWA staff and students via LMS Website | More Information
Do you feel confident to support students who have experienced sexual violence? Do you know how to best respond and where to refer the person for support if needed?

Responding to Disclosures of Sexual Violence is an interactive and comprehensive course for first responders. It will help you to develop the skills to respond appropriately, empathetically and confidently.

What will I learn? The Responding to Disclosures course will help you to: - Demonstrate an awareness of the issues and initiatives available around sexual violence, both at UWA and in wider society - Define what constitutes consent and identify the legal definitions of sexual offences in Western Australia - Dispel common myths and misconceptions around sexual violence - Explain the different support and reporting options available at UWA and externally - Demonstrate best practices for responding to a disclosure and apply these in line with UWA policies, procedures and services - Recognise when you (the responder) may need support in dealing with a disclosure

Who would benefit most from this course? Although all members of the UWA Community are welcome to complete this free course, frontline student support staff and student leaders are particularly encouraged to complete it.

This includes:

- Counselling and UniAccess staff - Security and Library staff - Student Advisers and Student Experience Officers - Guild student leaders such as Guild Council, Club and Society Executive - Students managing events - UniMentors - Sports Captains - Residential Advisers (RAs) - Residential College staff

How do I enrol? Visit the Fit For Study website for self-enrolment instructions
Wednesday 27
13:00 - SEMINAR - Heat Therapy: An ancient practice to target modern diseases : School of Human Sciences, Seminar Series Website | More Information
Presentation Summary:Chronic heat exposure, in the form of saunas, hot water baths, and sweat lodges have been utilized in many cultures for thousands of years. While repetitive bouts of heat exposure is generally believed to be healthy, it is only recently that we are beginning to understand the full benefits of ‘heat therapy’ across the spectrum of human health. Passive heating results in a rise in body temperature and changes in cardiovascular hemodynamics, including altered shear patterns of blood flow. There is growing evidence that these responses to acute heat stress combine over repetitive sessions to provide a stress-resistant profile to counter inflammation and oxidative stress, as occurs with aging and chronic disease, as well as from acute damaging events such as ischemia-reperfusion injury. There is also growing evidence heat therapy can be used to target metabolic dysfunction in obesity and diabetes through improvements in insulin signaling in fat and muscle cells. This ancient therapy needs broader application to treat modern diseases, particularly in those not able to obtain the full benefits of exercise. Speaker Biography:Dr. Christopher Minson is the Kenneth and Kenda Singer Professor of Human Physiology. His research focuses on topics related to integrative cardiovascular physiology in humans. His lab investigates how we can use exposures to extreme environments to gain a healthy and resilient physiology. He is also involved in projects related to endocrine function in women, biomarkers of aging and the risk of cardiovascular and metabolic diseases, and finding novel ways to improve thermal comfort and safely in work environments. He also works with elite athletes in the use of environmental stressors to improve performance.

 December 2019
Wednesday 04
9:00 - SYMPOSIUM - "Climate Change and Future CHild Health" : Symposium on the effects of climate change on future child health More Information
The symposium on Wednesday 4 December aims to provide the latest information on climate change, environmental degradation and population dynamics on the current and future health of children and the importance and potential of future child health research globally and in Western Australia

 February 2020
Saturday 01
9:30 - TUTORIAL - Read with Speed - back by popular demand : Double your reading speed and improve your comprehension Website | More Information
Learn how to quickly process the large amount of written information we all deal with daily in our business activities or academic studies. You will be provided with the skills to increase your reading speed significantly as well as improve your comprehension and memory. Students completing this course learn how the reading process works and understand how our brains process, store and retrieve information. They learn new techniques and practise these skills. The combination of knowledge, skills and practice enables students to develop into efficient readers.

 October 2020
Tuesday 27
13:00 - SEMINAR - Evaluating Auditory function in children with learning difficulties (Please note date change to 27 October, NOT 20th) : School of Human Sciences Seminar Series Website | More Information
Abstract: Children who experience poor academic performance at school have been d escribed as having learning difficulties (LD). These children are thought to show reduced performances in reading, written language and numeracy, and/or to be inactive and inefficient learners. Hearing is one of several factors thought to influence a child’s learning at school with students spending at least 45% of their classroom activities that require listening and 45 - 75% of their time in the classroom comprehending their teachers’ and classmates’ speech. Hearing impairment can include loss of hearing sensitivity and/or impaired auditory processing. While rates of peripheral hearing loss in the Australian primary school-aged population is estimated to be between 3.4% - 12.8%, rates of impaired auditory processing in this population are not available in Australia. Children with peripheral hearing loss and/or impaired auditory processing often show behaviours similar to those reported in children with LD, suggesting that LD and hearing impairment could be related in primary school child populations. This seminar will present the research that investigated LD and hearing impairment in a school-aged child population in the greater Brisbane region of Queensland, Australia.

Bio: Robyn is a lecturer in Audiology in School of Human Sciences. Robyn’s current area of research is auditory processing disorder and middle ear assessment in the paediatric population. In particular, Robyn is passionate about improving educational outcomes in children with learning difficulties who may have a hearing impairment. Robyn’s other research interests also include using simulated learning in clinical education and tele-audiology. Clinically, Robyn specialises in middle ear and Central Auditory Processing assessment and management in the paediatric population.

 January 2021
Saturday 16
9:00 - COURSE - Gold Standard GAMSAT Courses Perth : Problem-based learning approach to expand your knowledge, develop your reasoning, and to learn new GAMSAT strategies. Website | More Information
GAMSAT Courses Perth by Gold Standard will be entering our 10th year at the University of Western Australia (UWA). We have expanded from our original 4 full days of class to a brand new height of 8 full days, with no tuition fee increase.

Day 1 (01-16-2021): Non-science Review, Strategies and PBL: Section 1 and Section 2

Day 2 (01-17-2021): Bridging Gold Standard GAMSAT Course;

Day 3 (01-18-2021): Physical Sciences Problem-based Learning (Section 3)

Day 4 (01-19-2021): Biological Sciences Problem-based Learning (Section 3)

Day 5 (01-20-2021): GAMSAT Practice Test VR-1: Full-length Proctored Mock Exam

Day 6 (01-21-2021): GAMSAT Practice Test Review and Targeted PBL

Day 7 (01-22-2021): Continued GAMSAT Practice Test Review and Targeted PBL

Please note that you can also choose the course (per day) that is suitable to you.

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