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Today's date is Tuesday, October 27, 2020
Arts and Cultural events
 May 2019
Tuesday 28
13:00 - SEMINAR - How Regenerative Biology is Used to Sell the Dream of Lab Grown Consumer Products : School of Human Sciences Seminar Series Website | More Information
Abstract: The Tissue Culture & Art Project (Oron Catts and Ionat Zurr) are credited as the first to grow (2000) and eat (2003) lab grown meat as well as the first to grow tissue engineered leather (2004). These where critical art projects that were set to highlight the radical shifts in our understanding of, and relationships with the concept of life. More than ten years later cellular agriculture and biofabrication are hailed as solutions to a many environmental issues. The biological laboratory is imagined as the new farm, where animal and/or agricultural products a grown using regenerative biology and other bio-techniques. This talk would present the concepts behind the developments of cellular agriculture and biofabrication and would attempt to situate their existence within a timeline and scale of global scientific, technological, economic and cultural narratives and endeavours. It will start with the original Tissue Culture & Art Projects, follow the trajectory of the fields of cellular agriculture and biofabrication, and present some of the recent works from SymbioticA that are in dialogue with these recent developments, including a series of off grid incubators powered by compost.
Friday 31
13:00 - TALK - Friday Talk: Carrolup Noongar Artists - a talk by Ainslie Gatt Website | More Information
In the period 1946-1951, without formal artistic training, the children from Carrolup Native Settlement created pictorial representations of their country, depicting from their memory detailed landscapes of flora and fauna. These included kangaroos, possums, and birdlife and animated Noongar people participating in corroborees and hunting, totemic symbols, and the stylistic incorporation of atmospheric perspective.

Since that time, new generations of Noongar artists, including those with direct lineage to the Carrolup Settlement artists, have emerged with their unique visions of memory and the landscape.

Join senior curator and art consultant Ainslie Gatt as she addresses lineage and developments in the work of Noongar artists.

 June 2019
Saturday 01
14:00 - TALK - Artist Talk: Nikulinsky Naturally Website | More Information
In this artist talk, Philippa Nikulinsky AM leads us through her exhibition "Nikulinsky Naturally", a survey of her work from the 1970s to the present, sharing insights on her methodology and her exploration of the botanical riches of the Western Australian landscape.

15:30 - WORKSHOP - Nikulinsky Naturally: Education kit & PD for teachers Website | More Information
Join visual art educator Erin Knight in a professional development workshop for teachers as she introduces the education kit accompanying the exhibition "Nikulinsky Naturally".

The education kit explores how Philippa Nikulinsky and other artists have used botanical specimens in their artwork. The exhibition and kit inspires a practical art making program that can be used in both lower and upper school and provides a framework to be adapted by teachers to suit the needs of their classroom. Participate in the workshop, experience a close reading exercise and then bring your students along to view the exhibition.
Saturday 08
13:00 - WORKSHOP - UWA Music presents: Keyed Up! Day of Piano More Information
Join us for the annual Keyed Up! Day of Piano where you can learn tips and tricks of piano performance from some of Perth’s most experienced teachers and examiners. Why not ensure that every performance you give is one that you are proud of, whether that be for your University or School assessment, WACE practical or AMEB or other grade exams!

Led by UWA Head of Keyboard and Performance Studies, Graeme Gilling and supported by Perth’s finest pianists, teachers and performance specialists and ideally timed for those students undertaking ATAR Music and AMEB or other grade exams the Keyed Up! Day of Piano is an event not to be missed!

Register to perform and receive feedback from one of our expert panel in an informal workshop setting or just come along and observe students at your own level.

You’ll also have the opportunity to:

Hear performances by UWA Conservatorium of Music students

Explore the Conservatorium’s Historical Instrument collection with a guided session led by Dr Cecilia Sun The skills that you learn at the Keyed Up! Day of Piano will give you the confidence to excel in all your performance endeavours!

$10 Participants - $5 Parents accompanying students/Observers

13:30 - PUBLIC LECTURE - Roman Archaeology Group Public Lecture : The Romans in Egypt and Roman Mummy Portraits Website | More Information
Two public lectures delivered by Egyptologist Dr Michael Birrell. The first lecture "The Romans in Egypt" will start at 1:30. The second lecture "Roman Mummy Portraits" will follow a light afternoon tea. Please RSVP to Ann Boyer ([email protected]) by Tuesday, 4th June for catering purposes.

14:00 - EVENT - High Tea with Philip Noakes Website | More Information
Share an afternoon with artist Philip Noakes, beginning with an exhibition tour of "Sculptural Silver" followed by a high tea hosted at the University Club of Western Australia. Noakes shares stories about his life as a jeweller and silversmith in London, Sydney and Perth.
Tuesday 11
19:30 - EVENT - “Politics and the Novel” by Susan Midalia : Friends of the Library Talk More Information
Members: Free, Guests: $5 donation

The nineteenth-century French writer Stendhal famously observed that “politics in a literary work is like a gun shot in the middle of a concert: it’s something vulgar and coarse, which is also impossible to ignore.” Stendhal’s analogy posits the traditional model of literature as the realm of the aesthetic, expressive of beauty and universal moral truths, and which is regarded as superior to the grubby realm of “politics” – loosely defined here as pertaining to issues of power and human rights. This model naively presupposes the existence of non-political literature – as if it’s possible for any writing to exist in an ideology-free zone. Nevertheless, Stendhal’s comment also rightly highlights the challenge for a creative writer intent on exploring overtly political issues: how to avoid being “vulgar and coarse”; that is, ideologically dogmatic or morally self-righteous; how not to insult the intelligence of the reader, regardless of their political beliefs. This presentation will consider the creative strategies used in my political novel The Art of Persuasion in order avoid those pitfalls: the use of the romance genre to explore love as moral concept in our hyper-sexualised culture; and the use of wit or intelligent humour to raise questions about the crucial political issues of asylum seekers and climate change. I pay particular attention to my novel’s allusions to the fiction of Jane Austen, and its adherence to the Horatian dictum that writing should both delight and instruct. My novel The Art of Persuasion aims to give readers aesthetic delight – the pleasures of language and story – in order to encourage reflection on the issues that matter to me as a writer and a member of civil society.

Dr Susan Midalia has studied at Cambridge University and the University of Western Australia, where she completed a PhD in contemporary Australian women’s fiction. She has published in national and international literary journals, and taught in secondary and tertiary institutions for many years. Since becoming a full-time writer in 2006, she has published three collections of short stories, all of them shortlisted for major national literary awards: A History of the Beanbag (2007), An Unknown Sky (2012), and Feet to the Stars (2015). Her debut novel The Art of Persuasion was published in 2018, and her second novel has recently been accepted for publication.

Special Collections

The current display in the Special Collections foyer of donations by the Friends of the Library features maps showing the Dutch interest in the Indian Ocean region. These maps include copies of Polus Antarcticus by Jansson 1650, Frederick de Wit’s Orientaliora Indiarum Orientalium 1680, Mare del Sud 1765 by Zatta and Abraham Ortelius’ 1574 Indiae orientalis insvlarvmqve adiacientivm typvs.

The Friends of the Library have recently donated a facsimile copy of the Barcelona Haggadah to Special Collections. The illuminated Hebrew manuscript dates from the fourteenth century and contains the Haggadah, Laws for Passover, piyyutim and Torah readings for the festival of Passover according to the Spanish rite. The purchase of the facsimile was supported by Assoc/Prof Suzanne Wijsman (Chair of Strings Conservatorium of Music) for her research as the manuscript contains illustrations of musical instruments. Special Collections will next be open on Tuesday 11th June from 6.30pm – 7.15pm for members to view the Barcelona Haggadah.

RSVP: Kathryn Maingard – [email protected] or 08 6488 2356 https://www.eventbrite.com.au/e/politics-and-the-novel-tickets-62182092312
Wednesday 12
14:00 - WORKSHOP - The Art of Emotional Intelligence Website | More Information
While the modern world has long emphasised technical skills, emotional intelligence is now being touted as a requirement to thrive in an increasingly automated future. However, beyond the buzzword, how do these skills manifest everyday - in the workplace, at home, and in civic life?

Using art as a springboard, we look at some key emotional skills that serve you well to survive modern life, and how we can nurture them - such as adaptability, calm, creativity, self-awareness, playfulness, resilience and empathy.
Friday 14
13:00 - TALK - Friday Talk: 21 years of awe - The Alan Charters Prize comes of age Website | More Information
The enriching experience of travelling and working in foreign countries or regional environments as part of a clinical elective unit has provided challenges and ongoing rewards to numerous UWA medical students. Over the past 21 years the Alan Charters Prize Seminar has brought their experiences to the attention of a wider public. More recently, exhibitions of their photographs in the WAMSS Photographic Competition have also been featured at the Lawrence Wilson Art Gallery. Join prominent tropical medicine specialist Dr Peter Burke, a former student and colleague of Alan Charters who helped instigate the Alan Charters Prize Seminar, to hear his reflections about their experiences over this time and how they have impacted medical students’ careers.
Sunday 16
16:00 - PERFORMANCE - UWA Music presents: Walk of Shame : The Virtuoso Clarinet and Bass Clarinet More Information
Clarinettist Ashley Smith is a laureate of several of the Australian classical music industry’s most prestigious prizes, including the 2015 APRA Performance of the Year, the Music Council of Australia Freedman Fellowship, an ABC Symphony Australia Young Performer Award and a Churchill Fellowship.

He has performed throughout Australia, the USA and Asia including performances with Bang on a Can, the Chamber Music Society of the Lincoln Centre, Chamber Music Northwest, the Kennedy Centre, the Beijing Modern Music Festival as well as a soloist with several major Australian and Asian orchestras.

Ahead of his United States tour, Ashley presents a one-man recital of dizzying virtuosity. The solo works by Italian avant-garde composer Franco Donatoni are presented alongside Entr’acte by Chris Tonkin (a bass clarinet solo composed for Ashley) and David Lang’s Press Release.

Free entry – no bookings required
Tuesday 18
17:30 - PUBLIC LECTURE - UWA Music presents: Museum of Sound Series : Sound all Around: Introducing Sound Studies More Information
Do you remember the sound of dial-up internet? What about the whistle of an old kettle or a wine cork popping? Sounds, noise and music are fundamental to our lives.

Join us to explore our sonic past and present and learn how our lives are shaped by sound and listening.

Presented in collaboration with the City of Perth Library.

Sound all Around: Introducing Sound Studies Presented by Dr Sarah Collins

From the invention of the stethoscope to hear the secret sounds of the body, to the contemporary world of ipod and loudspeaker, this talk will trace a history of listening that will make you hear anew the sounds that shape our lives every day.

Sarah Collins works in music history at the UWA Conservatorium of Music. Her research concerns how perceptions of music and sound have shaped ideas about emotions, rationality, national identity and political participation in the past, and what these can tell us about our own soundscapes today.

Free entry - bookings essential

18:00 - PUBLIC TALK - Missing Magnificence: tracing Catherine de Medici’s hidden cultural legacy : Celebrating the 90th Anniversary of Italian Studies at UWA Website | More Information
A public talk by Professor Susan Broomhall, History, UWA.

2019 is also the 500th anniversary of the birth of Catherine de Medici. As queen consort, regent and queen mother, Catherine dominated sixteenth-century French political life. Embracing her Medici heritage, her cultural projects, from palaces and artworks, to ceramics and exotica, were widely reported (and critiqued) in her lifetime. But where can we see it today? This lecture explores Catherine's extensive cultural patronage and its legacy in Europe today, often hiding in plain sight.

2019 marks the 90th anniversary of the teaching of Italian language and culture at The University of Western Australia. In 1929, Francesco Vanzetti, an idiosyncratic and popular Venetian, offered the first courses in Italian. This was the first appointment of a lecturer in Italian in any Australian university. This lecture series, supported by the Institute of Advanced Studies and by Italian Studies in the UWA School of Humanities, celebrates aspects of Italian language and culture, past and present.
Wednesday 19
18:00 - PUBLIC TALK - The Global Rembrandt Website | More Information
A public lecture by Arvi Wattel, School of Design (History of Art), UWA.

A recurring image of Rembrandt is that of the solitary painter, retreating ever further into the privacy of his studio over the course of his career. Yet, the opposite could be said as well: Rembrandt was thoroughly connected to the social world of his time through patronage and his role as a teacher. There is one aspect of his social world, however, that remains under-emphasised – the artist’s engagement with global cultures. In the seventeenth century, Amsterdam - the city in which Rembrandt lived and worked - became increasingly more global: products from all over the world were available in shops and the population of the city changed significantly. This lecture explores Rembrandt's response to the ever-changing world around him.

Rembrandt’s death took place 350 years ago this year, in 1669. Museums across the globe, from Amsterdam to the Arabian Gulf, are staging exhibitions to commemorate his artistic legacy, and a life that was far from a masterpiece.

Sometimes dismissed contemptuously in his own time, the supreme genius of Rembrandt is now universally acknowledged. The Institute of Advanced Studies at The University of Western Australia is pleased to present a series of lectures offering insights into the artist’s life, his work and its reception.
Sunday 23
10:00 - EVENT - Perth Upmarket : Discover Perth's best design market at UWA Website | More Information
Perth Upmarket is Perth’s original and best design market, featuring more than 180 of Perth's most talented artists, designers, craftsmen and foodies all at The University of Western Australia's Winthrop Hall.

There is something for everyone, including a Junior Upmarket section in Hackett Hall which showcases all the best local designers for kids' clothing, toys, games and decor. Have a browse through the gourmet section to inspire your inner Masterchef, shop original locally designed homewares or find the perfect gift for someone special. Then enjoy a coffee or lunch relaxing on the beautiful lawns around Winthrop Hall.

DETAILS:

Sunday 23rd June 2019 Sunday 15th September 2019 Sunday 24th November 2019

Time: 10am-4pm
 Venue: The University of Western Australia’s Winthrop Hall
 Parking and entry free, venue is easily accessible, 3 ATMs on site
 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley
Website: www.perthupmarket.com.au Facebook.com/perthupmarket
Sunday 30
9:00 - WORKSHOP - UWA Music presents: ClariSax Feast 2019 Website | More Information
The Clarinet and Saxophone Society of Western Australia (CAASWA) in association with the UWA Conservatorium of Music and delighted to present ClariSax Feast 2019.

Presenters this year include Sydney based clarinettist, saxophonist and music educator Mark Walton (look at your music books at home and see how many of them he wrote!) and brilliant Perth based saxophonist Erin Royer. Come and hear them share their knowledge in a range of workshops throughout the day and hear them play in our concert at 1.30pm.

At this year's event we will also be featuring a special workshop called 'featuring the instrument,' where our guest artists will demonstrate a range of clarinets and saxophones by Buffet and Yamaha. If you are thinking of purchasing a new instrument this is a perfect opportunity to find out what you need to know and what to look for when making a decision.

Clarinet and Saxophone players of all ages and abilities are welcome.

Registrations are now open: https://form.jotform.co/CLARISAXWA/clarisaxfeast-2017-reg

$65 adult, $35 student or concession

 July 2019
Tuesday 02
7:00 - EVENT - WINTERarts: Getting Real - fakes : Experience the best in art, literature, music and ideas during the 2019 UWA WINTERarts season. Website | More Information
Never have ‘fakes’ been more prevalent — or are they? In this breakfast panel, we dive deep into the world of fakes: fake news, fake identities, fake art. Join Ted Snell, David Glance, Jani McCutcheon and Kathryn Prince for a panel discussion over breakfast at the University Club.

The 2019 UWA WINTERarts season runs 2 - 31 July. There are exhibitions, concerts, craft workshops, tours and a dedicated children’s program for the school holidays. Find an event for you at www.culturalprecinct.uwa.edu.au/winterarts
Saturday 06
10:00 - WORKSHOP - Spanish for Beginners : If you don’t already speak Spanish, you really should consider learning! Website | More Information
Whether you want to explore new cultures without having to rely on Siri to ask for directions, improve your job prospects, or keep your mind sharp, Spanish will help you achieve all of that and more. Nearly 9 million people around the world speak Spanish as it happens to be an extremely beautiful language that is as useful, as it is melodic. About the Teacher: Gabby Dolfi started teaching in Argentina, her home country. After migrating to Australia, she continued teaching ESL and Spanish. She is a Spanish and English Teacher as a Second Language since 2001. "Gabby Dolfi's Spanish course was excellent and her lesson delivery was always so productive. This made my beginners course a very rewarding experience!”

15:00 - WORKSHOP - WINTERarts: Chinese Calligraphy for Children : Experience the best in art, music and ideas during the 2019 UWA WINTERarts season. Website | More Information
Experience the magic of blending pen, ink and paper as you learn the ancient art of Chinese calligraphy. Unravel the mysteries of its four treasures and five fonts, and learn a little about how it all began more than 2500 years ago. Suitable for ages 7 - 12. Presented by the Confucius Institute

The 2019 UWA WINTERarts season runs 2 - 31 July. There are exhibitions, concerts, craft workshops, tours and a dedicated children’s program for the school holidays. Find an event for you at www.culturalprecinct.uwa.edu.au/winterarts
Monday 08
9:00 - EVENT - WINTERarts: Kin Village at Crawley : Experience the best in art, music and ideas during the 2019 UWA WINTERarts season. Website | More Information
With guidance from the team at Educated by Nature, children will learn how to build, light and tend fire in a safe and supported environment. Opportunities will also be provided for hut building, carpentry, community games, art and music. $81 per child, per day. Ages 6-12. Drop & leave program, children should bring their own lunch.

The 2019 UWA WINTERarts season runs 2 - 31 July. There are exhibitions, concerts, craft workshops, tours and a dedicated children’s program for the school holidays. Find an event for you at www.culturalprecinct.uwa.edu.au/winterarts

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