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Today's date is Monday, October 26, 2020
Arts and Cultural events
 April 2019
Friday 05
13:00 - PERFORMANCE - UWA Music presents: Free Lunchtime Concert | UWA Voice More Information
Be transported from the everyday by our free lunchtime concert series, featuring the best musical talent from within the UWA Conservatorium of Music and around the country.

Transcend the everyday in our free lunchtime concert featuring the sublime sounds of UWA voice students. These emerging young artists will present a mixed program of songs and arias covering the 300 years from Henry Purcell to Libby Larsen, accompanied by Gladys Chua.

Free entry, no bookings required.

13:00 - TALK - Friday Talk: Video Art in the Expanded Field Website | More Information
Dr Laetitia Wilson has taught art history courses on topics such as the evaluation of contemporary video practices. She has curated numerous significant exhibitions, including Theatres for the 2015 Perth Festival and Hyperprometheus at PICA for the 2018 SymbioticA Unhallowed Arts Festival. These exhibitions have featured internationally renowned video artists such as AES+F, Richard Mosse, Lu Yang and Chen Chieh-Jen. Join her to hear about contemporary developments in video art.
Saturday 06
10:00 - EVENT - Art Upmarket : Connecting art lovers with WA's best artists Website | More Information
Art Upmarket is all about connecting art lovers with Perth’s best artists. Meet the artists and purchase art directly from them on the day. Fill your home with local art. The market will showcase a curated selection of more than 50 of Perth’s most talented artists in Winthrop Hall. Saturday 6th April 2019 – 10am-4pm Free entry and parking. Venue is easily accessible 
Venue: The University of Western Australia’s Winthrop Hall Undercroft 

35 Stirling Highway, Crawley
Website: www.perthupmarket.com.au Facebook.com/perthupmarket #artupmarket
Tuesday 09
17:00 - SEMINAR - UWA Music presents: Callaway Centre Seminar Series | Shaun Fraser & Chris Milne More Information
A free weekly seminar series, with presenters from within UWA and from the wider community.

This week we have presentations from 2 HDR candidates:

Shaun Fraser: The preparatory beat is the most important gesture a conductor can give - this single gesture conveys significant information including tempo, dynamics, style, and character, but does it effectively transfer to a readable cue?

Chris Milne: Transcriptions make up a significant proportion of the wind band repertoire, but there is little research on successful techniques in replicating a homogenous a cappella choral work in a heterogeneous wind band setting. This study aimed to identify some of the techniques utilised by three contemporary composers and their transcriptions of their own choral works for wind band.

Free entry - no bookings required

19:00 - TALK - Friends of the library : The Panorama of Constantinople by Melchior Lorck Website | More Information
Dr. Nigel Westbrook trained in architecture in Melbourne, and later at the Architecture Association in London, where he was exposed to the rich architectural history of Europe. He had a career as a practising architect in London and Melbourne before crossing over to the University of Western Australia to take up a position in the Architecture school in 1993. He is now an Associate Professor, teaching and researching in architectural history and theory, and Associate Head (Research) at the School of Design. Overseas studio teaching (1994-1997) in Greece and Turkey led to an interest in the cultural exchanges between the Middle East and the West, and commencement of a PhD on the subject of the Classical survivals in the Byzantine Great Palace in Constantinople, now Istanbul, as the song goes. He is currently completing a book that grew out of the PhD, another co-edited book on Late Antique palaces, and a third, jointly written book on modern architecture and heritage in Iran, from the late 1960s to the late 1990s. All three books examine the subject of cultural exchanges. In the course of searching for documents that describe the transition from Byzantine to Ottoman culture in Istanbul, Nigel came across a mid-sixteenth century manuscript drawn by a Danish artist, Melchior Lorck, which depicts the city as it existed in 1559, a century after the Ottoman conquest. The book has proven to be a treasure trove of documentary evidence for long-disappeared monuments in the city.

In his talk, Nigel will discuss how the artist encountered the city, what his tools of the trade would have been, and what the manuscript, a panoramic view some 12 metres long, tells us about this fascinating and ancient city.
Wednesday 10
13:00 - CANCELLED - GUIDED TOUR - Going Slow: Visual Art x Mindfulness Tour Website | More Information
Unfortunately this event has been cancelled.



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Slow down your day by joining us for a different kind of art gallery tour. Much like a mindfulness exercise where you focus on your breathing, in this tour we settle our minds on the artwork on display. Community Partner: Institute for Creative Health with support from the Australian Government Catalyst Arts and Culture Fund.

13:00 - GUIDED TOUR - Going Slow: Visual Art x Mindfulness Tour Website | More Information
Slow down your day by joining us for a different kind of art gallery tour. Much like a mindfulness exercise where you focus on your breathing, in this tour we settle our minds on the artwork on display. Community Partner: Institute for Creative Health with support from the Australian Government Catalyst Arts and Culture Fund.

17:00 - PERFORMANCE - UWA Music presents: Centre Stage | Masterclass : The Brandenburg Quartet More Information
The Brandenburg Quartet features the four principal string players of the celebrated Australian Brandenburg Orchestra. Join these artists as they work with talented UWA students, offering unique guidance on performance, interpretation and technique.

Free entry, no bookings required
Thursday 11
9:30 - EVENT - Special Event: Rethinking Displays of Asian Art and Artefacts Website | More Information
Join Dr Lynne Howarth-Gladston and Professor Paul Gladston in a conversation about re-thinking displays of asian art and artefacts.

The Yellow Box was first developed during the first decade of the twenty-first century by the Hong Kong-based gallerist Chang Tsong-zung (Johnson Chang) as a critical intervention in the internationally dominant mode of gallery display known as the White Cube.

The Yellow Box encompasses a range of enacted and proposed modes of display purportedly conducive to the public showing of artworks produced using ideas and techniques associated traditionally with Chinese ‘literati’ painting, poetry writing and calligraphy.

-- The Yellow Box was first developed during the first decade of the twenty-first century by the Hong Kong-based gallerist Chang Tsong-zung (Johnson Chang) as a critical intervention in the internationally dominant mode of gallery display known as the White Cube. The Yellow Box encompasses a range of enacted and proposed modes of display purportedly conducive to the public showing of artworks produced using ideas and techniques associated traditionally with Chinese ‘literati’ painting, poetry writing and calligraphy.

16:00 - PERFORMANCE - Moved Reading: King Lear : All welcome for a participatory performance on the New Fortune stage More Information
The new season of moved readings is upon us and we are delighted to present our offerings for the first semester of 2019.Overseen by Bríd Phillips (project director) and Steve Chinna (staging director and much else!) with educational input from Kathryn Prince, the Renaissance Moved Readings Project continues the tradition of informal, participatory, fast-paced and usually hilarious readings of Shakespeare’s plays.

This semester’s moved readings are Thursdays from 4-6 pm on the New Fortune Stage:

28 March, Much Ado About Nothing (a witty battle of the sexes is waged, comedy ensues)

11 April, King Lear (a king foolishly divides his kingdom among his daughters, tragedy ensues)

16 May, The Tempest (on an enchanted island, magical and muggle characters meet, romance ensues)

Participants and spectators of all ages are welcome: over-18s are invited to bring their own libations for festive imbibing afterwards in the Shakespeare Garden.

18:00 - PUBLIC TALK - Stilled Life: the art of Isabella Kirkland Website | More Information
A public lecture held in conjunction with the Holmes à Court Gallery.

Isabella Kirkland is a fine art painter specializing in Natural History. Fusing the style of the 17th Century Dutch Masters with the more classical naturalistic tradition, Kirkland’s art addresses the ecological challenges that we currently face. Her magnificently sumptuous and complex oil paintings serve as a meticulous visual record of the many life forms that are on the brink of annihilation or are already extinct. Kirkland’s art bears witness to loss and testifies to the existence of those animals and plants that in the near future will be relegated to the historical record of this world.

In this lecture Isabella Kirkland will discuss her paintings and the role that her art plays in drawing attention to the loss of life forms. Isabella will be introduced by Janet Holmes à Court, AC.

Following Isabella's presentation, Tim Allard, Chief Executive Officer of the Australian Wildlife Conservancy and Professor Stephen Hopper from the Centre of Excellence in Natural Resource Management at UWA will give a short talk on animal extinctions and declining biodiversity in Australia.

Isabella Kirkland has been listed by Time magazine as one of the 100 leading artists in the United States. Over the course of her career, Kirkland has depicted hundreds of species, many of which are now extinct, many are on the edge of extinction and some are newly discovered. Her art has featured in several prominent exhibitions and is held in numerous collections. She has had solo exhibitions at the Toledo Art Museum, Ohio, the National Academy of Sciences, Washington, DC, and the Sun Valley Centre for the Arts, Idaho, and her work has been included in group shows at the Field Museum, Chicago, the Tucson Museum of Art, de Pury & Luxembourg, Zurich, the Yerba Buena Centre for the Arts, San Francisco, and the Harvard Museum of Natural History. Since 2006, Kirkland has been a principal field researcher and illustrator for the California Academy of Sciences, San Francisco.

18:30 - FREE LECTURE - UWA Music presents: Distinguished Artist Lecture Series with Chris van Tuinen : Presented in association with West Australian Opera More Information
UWA and West Australian Opera proudly present a Distinguished Artist Lecture Series with Chris van Tuinen entitled 'Collaboration and competition, risk and reward. A discussion on devising and producing opera seasons' Join us as West Australian Opera’s Music Director, Chris van Tuinen, discusses the challenges and opportunities involved in devising opera seasons.

How does one curate a program that excites and inspires diverse audiences? Chris will address some of the key risks facing the operatic landscape, the importance of collaboration and the appetite for new work in this 400 year old artform.

Free entry, bookings essential | RSVP to [email protected]

Refreshments served from 6.30pm
Friday 12
13:00 - PERFORMANCE - UWA Music presents: Free Lunchtime Concert | Irwin Street Collective : UWA Winds and guest coach Nicola Boud More Information
Be transported from the everyday by our free lunchtime concert series, featuring the best musical talent from within the UWA Conservatorium of Music and around the country.

This week emerging artists from the UWA Woodwind Program perform works by Mozart, Krommer, Spohr, Weber, Rossini and Schumann. These young artists have received coaching from Institute of Advance Studies Visiting Fellow and proud UWA Graduate Nicola Boud, who returns to UWA for a residency with the Irwin Street Collective.

Free entry, no bookings required.
Saturday 13
11:30 - EVENT - Art+Feminism Wikipedia Edit-a-thon Website | More Information
In celebration of International Women’s Day, we present Art+Feminism, a global movement to improve coverage and representation of women artists. Join us for a day-long program of floor talks, panel discussions, and a Wikipedia hackathon.
Sunday 14
10:30 - PERFORMANCE - UWA Music presents: Centre Stage | The Winthrop Singers with Piñata Percussion More Information
As part of Choralfest 2019, The Winthrop Singers and Piñata Percussion lead a Palm Procession, followed by a Mass at St Patrick's Basilica, including a new setting of St Luke's Gospel by Nicholas Bannan.

Further information from choralfest.org.au
Tuesday 16
17:00 - SEMINAR - UWA Music presents: Callaway Centre Seminar Series | Nicola Boud : An Introduction to Historical Clarinets More Information
A free weekly seminar series, with presenters from within UWA and from the wider community.

This week we welcome UWA Graduate and celebrated period clarinettist Nicola Boud to present 'An Introduction to Historical Clarinets'

Despite being a relative latecomer to the woodwind family, the clarinet has it’s own fascinating story to tell. Its mechanical evolution greatly varied throughout Europe since the 18th century, with each step of its development, together with distinctive variation in stylistic language differing from one country to the next. These historical elements shed light on performance considerations that we face today

Born in Perth, Nicola obtained her Bachelor of Music with first class honours from the University of Western Australia in 1999, and was awarded the Edith Cowan Prize for performance and musicology. During her studies Nicola began to play with the Australian Chamber Orchestra on modern and historical clarinet. Her curiosity in early music took her to the Netherlands, where she completed her Masters in historical performance at the Royal Conservatory in the Hague with Eric Hoeprich in 2004.

Now based in Europe, Nicola tours and records extensively, and is in demand as principal clarinet with various orchestras and ensembles. Nicola is also an active chamber musician, regularly performing with the pianist Kristian Bezuidenhout, and the Cambini and Edding Quartets, and has performed at many prestigious festivals. Nicola returns to UWA for this week-long residency as an Institute of Advanced Studies Misha Strassberg Fellow.

Free entry - no bookings required
Wednesday 17
18:00 - EVENT - Shaping the Invisible: images reflected in music : Celebrating the 90th Anniversary of Italian Studies at UWA Website | More Information
A public talk by Mr Robert Hollingworth, Reader in Music, University of York and Director, I Fagiolini.

Robert Hollingworth will present a new CD of choral music from his much acclaimed vocal ensemble ‘I Fagiolini’. With Leonardo Da Vinci expert Professor Martin Kemp, Robert has selected music from the 15th to the 20th centuries, inspired by and reflecting images and ideas of Da Vinci. The title track is a new commission bridging a gap between the early 21st century and Leonardo, on the 500th anniversary of his death. In this lecture Robert will discuss the project, show the pictures and play some of the music.

2019 marks the 90th anniversary of the teaching of Italian language and culture at The University of Western Australia.

In 1929, Francesco Vanzetti, an idiosyncratic and popular Venetian, offered the first courses in Italian. This was the first appointment of a lecturer in Italian in any Australian university.

This lecture series, supported by the Institute of Advanced Studies and by Italian Studies in the UWA School of Humanities, celebrates aspects of Italian language and culture, past and present.
Thursday 18
19:30 - PERFORMANCE - UWA Music presents: Centre Stage | Nicola Boud and The Irwin Street Collective More Information
Born in Perth, Nicola obtained her Bachelor of Music with first class honours from the University of Western Australia in 1999, and was awarded the Edith Cowan Prize for performance and musicology. During her studies Nicola began to play with the Australian Chamber Orchestra on modern and historical clarinet. Her curiosity in early music took her to the Netherlands, where she completed her Masters in historical performance at the Royal Conservatory in the Hague with Eric Hoeprich in 2004.

Now based in Europe, Nicola tours and records extensively, and is in demand as principal clarinet with various orchestras and ensembles. Nicola is also an active chamber musician, regularly performing with the pianist Kristian Bezuidenhout, and the Cambini and Edding Quartets, and has performed at many prestigious festivals. Nicola returns to UWA for this week-long residency as an Institute of Advanced Studies Misha Strassberg Fellow.

The culmination of a week-long residency, Nicola will perform alongside members of the Irwin Street Collective in a concert that will feature Mozart's beautiful Kegelstatt Trio and a rare performance of Beethoven's horn sonata played in a contemporary arrangement for basset horn.

Free entry, bookings essential | trybooking.com/BASWT
Saturday 27
11:30 - GUIDED TOUR - LWAG Signs: Auslan Interpreted Tour Website | More Information
Experience the artwork at LWAG in Australian Sign Language. Join us for a free tour in Auslan of the current exhibitions Love, Displaced and Carrolup Revisited guided by a gallery staff member and interpreter from Auslan Stage Left.

Community Partner: Auslan Stage Left
Tuesday 30
17:00 - SEMINAR - UWA Music presents: Callaway Centre Seminar Series | Nicholas Bannan : Did the voices of men and women evolve to sing in harmony? More Information
A free weekly seminar series, with presenters from within UWA and from the wider community.

Since Darwin, evolutionary explanations of the role of vocal communication in the development of human cultural universals have received fluctuating levels of attention. While during the early 20th Century ethnomusicologists such as Sachs and von Hornbostel sustained an interest in the distribution of musicality as an inseparable feature of the human condition, little progress was made for more than a century after Darwin in examining the material evidence for musical origins. A key feature of this from an animal behaviour perspective – especially in terms of the application of Darwin’s sexual selection model to human musicality – is the gendered nature of the anatomy that permits us to engage in music. Comparisons across species indicate considerable sexual dimorphism in terms of such features as: range; role; interaction; and purpose. Humans, like Pied Butcher Birds, have equal and complementary capacities for musical generativity and participation, with a clearly superior role for the female in employing music in child-rearing. Studies in linguistics have remarked on the assumed universal whereby the vocal ranges of human adult males and females lie on average exactly an octave apart: a feature plainly evident in cultural practice. Yet an explanation for this in the voice and music literature is strangely absent. This paper reports on the initiation of a research project aiming to address this lacuna in the research landscape, and to set out some of the definitions and other factors that need require consideration.

Further information at music.uwa.edu.au

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