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Today's date is Thursday, August 13, 2020
External events held at UWA
 July 2019
Tuesday 16
17:30 - EVENT - Italian Studies at UWA. 1929-2019 : Talk by Associate Professor John Kinder on how UWA became the first University in Australia to appoint a Lecturer in Italian. Website | More Information
This talk will explain how UWA became the first University in Australia to appoint a Lecturer in Italian in 1929, followed soon after by the Universities of Melbourne and Sydney, and why Francesco Vanzetti only retired, aged 85, in 1963.
Thursday 18
18:00 - FREE LECTURE - Sea Change: Global tracking of marine megafauna under anthrogenic footprint Website | More Information
Join us for this talk in the Anthropocene Sea Change Seminar Series at the UWA Oceans Institute with Ana Martins Sequeira.

Human impacts (e.g. overharvesting, by-catch mortality, pollution, acoustic and habitat degradation) have led to declines in abundance of many marine megafauna. Many species are threatened and with a bleak outlook for recovery due to little or no management in some cases, and a lack of international agreements on conservation of high seas biodiversity. Tracking data have led to evidence-based conservation of marine megafauna, but a disconnect remains between the many tens of 1000s of individual animals that have been tracked and the data used in conservation and management actions. I will discuss how, through the Marine Megafauna Movement Analytical Program (mmmp.wordpress.com) I am currently leading, we see that a global approach combining tracked movements of marine megafauna and human activities at-sea, and using existing and emerging technologies (e.g., artificial intelligence and big data approaches) can be applied to deliver near-real time diagnostics on existing risks and threats to mitigate global risks for marine megafauna. With technology developments over the next decade expected to catalyse the potential to survey marine animals and human activities in ever more detail and at global scales, the development of dynamic predictive tools based on near-real time tracking and environmental data will become crucial to address increasing risks.

Ana is a Marine Ecologist interested on the development of models to assist our understanding of the marine environment. Currently, her main focus is on understanding movement patterns of highly migratory marine megafauna, such as sharks, seals and whales, and on how they will fare with increasing anthropogenic pressures. To achieve this, Ana is leading the Marine Megafauna Movement Analytical Program (MMMAP; mmmap.wordpress.com), which aims to significantly improve our understanding of marine megafauna movement at a global scale to ultimately assist the conservation and management of economically important, charismatic and threatened highly migratory marine species. Ana is a DECRA Research Fellow at the University of Western Australia, funded by the Australian Research Council and supported by the Australian Institute of Marine Science.
Saturday 20
9:30 - WORKSHOP - Start Your Blog in a Day! : Private and Business Website | More Information
Whether you’ve read a few blogs or have never heard of one, this course will get you blogging. Find out how to write and manage a blog, what to include, who your audience is, and how you can even make money from blogging. Participants will have the opportunity to start their own blog. For beginner bloggers, the process of starting up your blog can seem daunting, but this course will show you how and get you off on the right foot all in just one day. Learn about how to start your blog, choosing your subjects and how to write your blog posts, what kind of content and media to include, how to find out who your audience is and track their every move, and what you should know about copyright and privacy when you’re blogging.

Each participant will begin a blog by setting it up online and writing the first post. We will also cover how to include images and videos and even discuss how you can make money from blogging, all while learning from the ideas of other prospective bloggers.
Wednesday 24
18:00 - FREE LECTURE - Finding Rembrandt in Love and Life : A public lecture by Professor Susan Broomhall (The University of Western Australia) Website | More Information
This lecture explores how the character of Rembrandt van Rijn is interpreted through place, gender and emotions in museums and heritage sites in the Netherlands today. It focuses on the cities of Leiden and Amsterdam, Rembrandt’s homes, and particularly, the role of women in shaping interpretations of Rembrandt’s life and work. Historical women in Rembrandt’s life are increasingly employed as tools to understand the artist’s mind in creative responses such as Peter Greenaway’s 2006 film Nightwatching or the 2009 Australian opera by Andrew Ford and Sue Smith, Rembrandt’s Wife. This lecture investigates how heritage sites have likewise co-opted Rembrandt’s relationships with women, in a range of ways, in order to increase visitor engagement.

This public lecture is part of the 'Rembrandt – 350th Anniversary Lecture Series' presented by the Institute of Advanced Studies at The University of Western Australia and sponsored by the ARC Centre of Excellence for the History of Emotions.

 August 2019
Thursday 08
13:00 - EVENT - Heading for Extinction (And What to Do About It) : A public presentation from Extinction Rebellion WA about the climate crisis and our response to it Website | More Information
There is no more time to delay taking urgent action on the ecological crisis which is upon us. Unless we respond now, societal collapse and mass extinction are seen as inevitable by scientists and many other experts. We can all feel it coming.

Extinction Rebellion WA is part of an international movement that uses non-violent civil disobedience to minimise the risk of human extinction and ecological collapse. Extinction Rebellion believes it is a citizen’s duty to rebel. History shows us that peaceful civil disobedience is the most effective way to bring about rapid social change.

In this public talk, we will share the latest climate science on where our planet is heading, discuss some of the current psychology around climate change, and offer solutions through the study of social movements.

In August, Extinction Rebellion WA will roll out direct actions across Perth, including a Declaration at Parliament on August 15th.

Everyone is welcome and there will be time to ask questions and discuss afterwards
Tuesday 13
7:30 - TALK - “The Atlantis of the North: unique records from ‘drowned landscapes’ off northern Australia” : Friends of the Library Talk Website | More Information
One of the defining attributes of modern humans is their ability to cross, navigate and systematically exploit maritime landscapes and resources. Some of the earliest indirect evidence for the maritime capabilities of people comes from the settling of the Wallacean Islands and Sahul (Australia, PNG, Tasmania). Direct evidence includes early dated occupation sites in northern Australia, fishing technologies and marine dietary assemblages from Timor Leste and Borneo, and midden and shell artefacts from North West Australia dated from 50,000 years ago. In this lecture Peter will profile research that he and his colleagues have carried out on the North West Shelf and the islands and interior of northern Australia.

Professor Peter Veth has carried out multi-decadal research on the archaeology of Aboriginal societies and their evolving land and seascapes. He has held academic positions at JCU, the ANU and UWA and been on the Executive Leadership team at AIATSIS. He has recently finished as the inaugural Chair of Kimberley Rock Art and is now the Director of the UWA Oceans Institute.

Special Collections – special viewing for members

Special Collections will be open on Tuesday 13th August 6.30pm – 7.15pm for members to view a selection of maps of the Indian and Pacific oceans held in Special Collections before the start of the talk by Peter Veth.

Future Events

“Translating a classic French novel: the problems posed by Emile Zola’s The Dream” by Dr Paul Gibbard, Lecturer European Languages and Studies is the topic for the 10th September talk.

October 8th is a special event, the presentation of the Clérambault 1710 edition from David Tunley to the Special Collections, with a performance of the work by the Conservatorium of Music Irwin Street Collective. The venue will be the Eileen Joyce Studio Conservatorium of Music.

Our final speaker for the year is Jill Benn, University Librarian and her presentation is “Library Place for Learning Space: Reflections in the Changing Nature of the Academic Library. Drinks and nibbles will be provided by the Friends of the Library after the 12th November talk.

Friends of the Grounds

Friends of the Library may be interested in events organised by the Friends of the Grounds. The film “The Making of Gardens by the Bay” on Sunday 28th July, see details below and the Annual Seddon Lecture on Thursday 1 August in the Ross Lecture Theatre, Physics Building from 6 pm to 7 pm. Tickets are free at Eventbrite or contact UWA Institute of Advanced Studies, [email protected] A small donation for wine and cheese after for those attending.
Tuesday 27
14:00 - PUBLIC LECTURE - Free Seminar: The seas of Papua New Guinea and the Sepik River outflow : Insights from a voyage on RV Franklin Website | More Information
George Cresswell completed his undergraduate degree at UWA and PhD at the University of Alaska. He spent 1960 at Mawson station Antarctica. The majority of his career was with CSIRO in Sydney and Hobart. He studied the East Australian Current, the Leeuwin Current, and the currents of the seas of New Caledonia, Papua New Guinea and SE Asia. In all, he has collected data while working on ships of eight nations. Other data have come from moored instruments, satellite-tracked drifters and thermal and radar satellite imagery.

In 1997 he ran a voyage on RV Franklin into the seas of Papua New Guinea. It was part a study called TROPICS (Tropical River/Ocean Processes in Coastal Settings) that was the brainchild of, and orchestrated by, AIMS scientist Gregg Brunskill. Since that time George has carried out desktop consultancies covering PNG waters.

In this free public seminar George will discuss the voyage. The instrumentation included the suite on Franklin, two instrument moorings, simple drifters – and NOAA thermal imagery, RADARSAT synthetic aperture radar scenes, and SeaWIFS ocean colour imagery.

The dominant large scale features were: the strong New Guinea Coastal Undercurrent that flows through Vitiaz Strait and then reaches along the coast towards Irian Jaya; a SE monsoon-driven upwelling plume from SW New Britain that joins Solomon Sea waters to flow through Vitiaz Strait to bathe the offshore islands and the northern PNG coast; the New Guinea Coastal Current that reverses with the monsoons.

During the Franklin (SE monsoon) survey the surface plume from the Sepik River was only about 2 m thick and it moved offshore ~10 km at 1 m s–1 before being turned to the NW by the underlying currents.

The waters down to several hundred metres in the Sepik study area were comprised of stacks of many mixed layers, with enhanced loads of suspended sediment at the bases of most of them. These subsurface sediment plumes became depleted with increasing distance offshore. Although the tides in the region are small, the moored instruments showed semi-diurnal internal tidal currents to have amplitudes up to 0.15 m s–1 and to be associated with vertical oscillations of perhaps 40-50m.
Wednesday 28
8:30 - CONFERENCE - WA Migration and Mobilities Update : ‘Belonging in Western Australia: Addressing Migrant and Refugee Inclusion’ Website | More Information
This year the Update tackles the important question of belonging, with the theme ‘Belonging in Western Australia: Addressing Migrant and Refugee Inclusion’. Each year around 200,000 people move permanently to Australia, and many more come temporarily for work or education – how are we, as a community, meeting their needs and ensuring they feel they ‘belong’ in Australia? Our program brings together policy makers, not-for-profits, communities and academics to explore questions such as: What does belonging look like? What are migrants’ and ethnic minorities’ experiences of inclusion and exclusion? How can services support belonging? To what extent is Australia’s migration system inclusive? How can we create inclusive spaces for migrants? What are the roles of schools, local councils, the media, and service organisations in generating belonging? Keynote Prof Paolo Boccagni (University of Trento), will speak on “Migrant Home-making: Insights from Europe”, and a range of representatives from community, government and academia will discuss experiences of belonging and unbelonging, and programs designed to promote inclusion, including arts, sports, media, local government and education based interventions.

 September 2019
Saturday 07
12:00 - COURSE - MHFA for Non-Suicidal Self-Injury (NSSI) : MHFA for Non-Suicidal Self-Injury (NSSI) Website | More Information
The 4-hour Mental Health First Aid for Non-Suicidal Self-Injury course is for any interested adult who is interested to learn how to assist a person who is engaging in self-injury.

This course is based on guidelines developed through the expert consensus of people with lived experience of mental health problems and professionals.
Tuesday 10
19:30 - EVENT - Translating a classic French novel: the problems posed by Emile Zola’s ‘The Dream’ By Paul Gibbard : Friends of the Library Website | More Information
$5.00 donation for non members

In his celebrated Rougon-Macquart series of twenty novels, Émile Zola sought to present a ‘natural and social history of a family’ during the years of the Second Empire in France, 1852-1870. This was a family filled with ‘ravenous appetites’ who diffused in to all strata of French society, from the world of labour, in works like L’Assommoir and Germinal, to the upper echelons of French society in novels such as Money and The Kill. This classic sequence has not been published in its entirety in English since the late nineteenth century, but a project by Oxford World’s Classics to produce new translations of the whole series in now nearing completion.

This talk by Paul Gibbard, who has recently published his translation of The Dream (the sixteenth novel in the series), will present an overview of Zola’s career as a novelist and explain how the Frenchman’s aims and ideas evolved over forty years. It will look at some of the problems faced by early English-language translators of Zola’s novels (and their perceived obscenity) before moving on to some of the questions modern translators must address – and the particular issues involved in translating The Dream.

Dr Paul Gibbard is Senior Lecturer in French Studies at the University of Western Australia. His research interests lie in eighteenth- and nineteenth-century French fiction and intellectual history. He has worked previously as an editor of the Complete Works of Voltaire at the Voltaire Foundation in Oxford and his publications include critical editions of Voltaire’s Questions on the Encyclopedia (2008) and Letters on the New Héloïse (2013), an edited collection of essays, Political Ideas of Enlightenment Women (2013), and a translation of Émile Zola’s novel The Dream (2018). He is currently working on a translation of the journal of the botanist Théodore Leschenault who travelled to Australia with the Baudin expedition of 1800-1804.

Special Collections – special viewing for members

Special Collections 2nd Floor Reid Library will be open on Tuesday 10th September 6.30pm – 7.15pm for members to view a selection of French materials from the collection before the start of the talk by Paul Gibbard.

Future Events

October 8th is a special event, the presentation of the Clérambault 1710 edition from David Tunley to the Special Collections, with a performance of the work by the Conservatorium of Music Irwin Street Collective. The venue will be the Eileen Joyce Studio Conservatorium of Music. Our final speaker for the year is Jill Benn, University Librarian and her presentation is “Library Place for Learning Space: Reflections in the Changing Nature of the Academic Library. Drinks and nibbles will be provided by the Friends of the Library after the 12th November talk

RSVP: Kathryn Maingard – [email protected] or 08 6488 2356 https://www.eventbrite.com.au/e/translating-a-classic-french-novel-by-emile-zolas-the-dream-tickets-69820688559
Sunday 15
10:00 - EVENT - Perth Upmarket : Discover Perth's best design market at UWA Website | More Information
Perth Upmarket is Perth’s original and best design market, featuring more than 180 of Perth's most talented artists, designers, craftsmen and foodies all at The University of Western Australia's Winthrop Hall.

There is something for everyone, including a Junior Upmarket section in Hackett Hall which showcases all the best local designers for kids' clothing, toys, games and decor. Have a browse through the gourmet section to inspire your inner Masterchef, shop original locally designed homewares or find the perfect gift for someone special. Then enjoy a coffee or lunch relaxing on the beautiful lawns around Winthrop Hall.

DETAILS:

Sunday 15th September 2019 Sunday 24th November 2019

Time: 10am-4pm Venue: The University of Western Australia’s Winthrop Hall Parking and entry free, venue is easily accessible, 3 ATMs on site 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley Website: www.perthupmarket.com.au Facebook.com/perthupmarket

 October 2019
Thursday 03
16:45 - PUBLIC TALK - Community Forum and Q&A : This is your chance to hear from a number of specialists who will present an overview of the advances being made in respiratory health Website | More Information
The Institute for Respiratory Health and The National Centre for Asbestos Related Diseases will host a series of short talks from both our internationally renowned and emerging researchers on the latest discoveries and future directions in respiratory related diseases. Refreshments in the Perkins foyer from 4.45pm, followed by the talks and Q&A session from 5.30pm. There will be laboratory tours from 6.30pm – numbers for the tours are strictly limited.
Tuesday 08
11:44 - EVENT - Agriculture 4.0 (The Future of Agriculture) : AGRI 4.0 2020 More Information
Saturday 19
9:30 - WORKSHOP - Mindfulness made simple! : Back by popular demand Website | More Information
Mindfulness is both a Buddhist practice and a psychological therapy. It has gained great popularity in recent years, for good reason as it has many physical and psychological benefits. Mindfulness practices can help with many common maladies, such as anxiety, depression, insomnia and pain management. Also, mindfulness activates the parasympathetic nervous system in the body, reducing tensions and promoting the body’s natural healing mechanisms. So it is good for your health! In this two week workshop Kate will introduce several mindfulness and meditation practices that you can explore and incorporate into your daily life. You will learn how to quickly relax your mind and body, pay attention to specific aspects of moment by moment awareness and easily shift focus from one activity to the next.

10:00 - EVENT - Art Upmarket - Sat 19th Oct 2019 : Connecting art lovers with WA's best artists Website | More Information
Art Upmarket is all about connecting art lovers with Perth’s best artists. Meet the artists and purchase art directly from them on the day. Fill your home with local art. The market will showcase a curated selection of more than 55 of Perth’s most talented artists in Winthrop Hall.

Saturday 19th October 2019 – 10am-4pm

Free entry and parking. Venue is easily accessible.

Venue: The University of Western Australia’s Winthrop Hall and Undercroft, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley 6009

For more information please visit: www.perthupmarket.com.au www.instagram.com/artupmarket #artupmarket https://www.facebook.com/events/1814055352028211/

10:00 - WORKSHOP - Become a WA frog scientist : Join us for a free workshop to help conserve frogs in Australian cities. Website | More Information
Love frogs? Keen to observe WA’s very own motorbike frog and contribute to meaningful science?

We’re looking for citizen scientists to join us for a series of free workshops that will help conserve frogs in Australian cities.

During the workshops you’ll learn how to conduct field surveys using the CAUL Urban Wildlife app. We’ll then visit nearby sites where you will put your newfound skills to the test during a practice frog survey.

The CAUL Urban Wildlife app is available on Android and iPhone, so simply attend one of our three workshops, bring your device and jump to it! If possible, please download the app in advance of the workshop: https://nespurban.edu.au/platforms/caul-urban-wildlife-app/.

Workshop times and locations

Saturday, October 19: 10am–12pm at UWA Crawley campus, Woolnough Lecture Theatre, Geology and Geography Building.

12pm–2pm at UWA Crawley campus, Woolnough Lecture Theatre, Geology and Geography Building.

Sunday, October 20: 10am–12pm at ECU Joondalup Campus, Building 7, room 103.

10:00 - CONFERENCE - TEDxUWA 2019: New Frontiers : TEDxUWA is back with an exciting event dedicated to ideas worth spreading! Website | More Information
Immerse yourself in the innovative ideas and one-of-a-kind stories that are important to the community at the University of Western Australia - and beyond!

At this year’s annual conference, TEDxUWA has brought together a line-up of brilliant speakers that will push the frontiers between what we know and understand.

TEDxUWA 2019: New Frontiers is a chance to take an active part in important discussions that matter to students, alumni, educators, and anyone with a curious mind. Whether you’re interested in finding your identity or minimising waste for the future of our environment, these talks showcase fascinating ideas that will challenge and inspire you.
Tuesday 22
10:00 - PUBLIC LECTURE - Eye Health and Research Lectures : Free community lectures at the Lions Eye Institute Website | More Information
The Lions Eye Institute will host 4 free public lectures about eye health and eye research: 10am Prof Bill Morgan: 'Adventures in the Pressure Space' - the optic nerve in Glaucoma and in outer space. 11.30am Dr Andrea Ang: 'Can I get rid of my glasses Doc?' - LASIK and refractive surgery 1pm Dr Hessom Razavi: 'Journey into the Eye' - looking at the eye and disease through virtual reality 2.30pm Dr Angus Turner: 'Country eyes' - how to give sight-saving treatment away from the city lights
Thursday 24
16:00 - FREE LECTURE - Shann Lecture: The End of Normal in Politics and Economics : Shann Memorial Lecture 2019 with Jennifer Hewett (AFR) Website | More Information
The UWA Business School Economics Department is pleased to invite you to attend the annual Shann Memorial Lecture, The End of Normal in Politics and Economics on Thursday 24 October.

Polarization over Brexit, China’s military belligerence, political deterioration in Hong Kong and lack of US leadership are all contributing to increasing political dysfunction and unpredictability in the global economy. What does this mean for the Australian economy? Join Jennifer Hewett (The Australian Financial Review) for an up-to-date and insightful discussion of these major challenges facing us today.

The annual Shann Memorial Lecture was introduced to honour the memory of the Foundation Professor of Economics at UWA, Edward Owen Giblin Shann. Edward Shann has been regarded as the pioneer of the academic development of economics and traditional Australian economic history and he was a strong advocate of individual intellectual freedom and developing a sense of social responsibilities. He penned several books and essays on the economic history of Australia and was a major influence in formulating financial and fiscal policies in Australia.

18:00 - PUBLIC TALK - FREE PUBLIC SEMINAR: Geopolitics of Maritime Pasts: Connecting the Indian Ocean and South China Sea : Ideas about peaceful seas and civilisations in dialogue are 'strategic narratives' at a time when States seek power through structures of connectivity Website | More Information
In their recent show of friendship, why exactly did Xi Jinping and Narendra Modi exchange portraits of each other on silk and ceramic? While the Western media didn’t ponder such matters, the meaning of these gifts was debated intensely in both China and India. This presentation demonstrates why this moment forms part of a much larger, and fast changing, landscape of geocultural politics. China’s Belt and Road Initiative is driving this, transforming the geopolitics of the Indian Ocean and South China Sea through a narrative of a ‘revived’ Maritime Silk Road.

To date, analyses of maritime geopolitics in these regions have primarily gravitated around sea-lane ‘choke points’, or the construction of port infrastructure and artificial islands. What has been missed is the strategic importance countries across Asia now place on crafting and revising history for maritime diplomacy and economic development. As we will see, for Indonesia, it is the ‘spice routes’, elsewhere it might be Zheng He. The presentation demonstrates the Maritime Silk Road is not 2000 years old, but a history invented at the end of the Cold War. A series of short films will be shown to illustrate how think-tanks, academics, museums, BBC World, Russia Today, and Chinese state television uncritically repeat this ‘history’ of trade and exchange, and it will be argued that ideas about peaceful seas and civilisations in dialogue are ‘strategic narratives’ at a time when states seek power through structures of connectivity.

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