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Today's date is Monday, October 26, 2020
Business School - Research
 June 2014
Monday 02
14:00 - Training Course - iVEC Supercomputing Training Courses Website | More Information
In the week beginning 2 June 2014, iVEC will offer the following free short courses on supercomputing topics:

Introduction to iVEC: 2:00 – 3:00pm Mon 2nd June

Introduction to Linux: 3:30 – 4:30pm Mon 2nd June

Introduction to Supercomputing: 10:00am – 4:00pm Tues 3rd June

Developing with MPI and OpenMP: 10:00am – 4:00pm Wed 4th June.

Further details of the courses and the registration form can be found on the iVEC website. Courses are delivered in a face to face classroom style. Attendees are encouraged to bring and work on their own laptops. Staff from the Supercomputing Team will be facilitating so you can meet and chat with them.

Any queries, please contact Dr Rebecca Hartman-Baker – [email protected]

This is a free event however, you must register as places are limited.
Wednesday 04
17:30 - EVENT - MBA Information Evening (Perth) : An information evening for prospective Master of Business Administration students Website | More Information
Come along to the UWA Business School's information evening for the Master of Business Administration (MBA), where you can learn about our new MBA Full Time as well as MBA Flexible. You will have the opportunity to meet professors and current students, have all your questions answered, and even apply on the night.

You will be able to meet professors and students from 5.30pm onwards, with the formal presentation beginning at 6.00pm.
Thursday 05
8:30 - CONFERENCE - 10th Australasian Development Economics Workshop : This event brings together development economists from Australia and internationally with particular emphasis on the Asia-Pacific region. Website | More Information
The annual Australasian Development Economics Workshop, sponsored by DFAT, brings together development economists from Australia and internationally with particular emphasis on the Asia-Pacific region.

The next workshop is the tenth in the series and will be hosted by the Business School, The University of Western Australia, Perth.

Professor Lant Pritchett (Harvard University) will deliver the keynote address. We will also have a roundtable discussion on the “Middle Income Trap” with Professor James Riedel (Johns Hopkins University), Professor Xin Meng (Australian National University) and Dr. Sudarno Sumarto (SMERU).

Register here: www.business.uwa.edu.au/research/conferences/10th-australasian-development-economics-workshop

13:30 - EVENT - IOA Postgraduate Showcase - Frontiers in Agriculture : 9 PhD students present their diverse agriculture-related research Website | More Information
The Institute of Agriculture's annual Postgraduate Showcase brings together some of UWA’s best PhD students at an advanced stage of their research. This year, nine presentations covering a wide range of disciplines will highlight some of the research and progress underway at UWA in the area of agriculture, food science and natural resource management. The event also provides opportunities for students to interact with industry representatives and future employers.

For catering purposes, please RSVP by 26 May to [email protected]
Tuesday 24
9:00 - COURSE - Introductory Statistics : A Short Course using SPSS Website | More Information
The aim of this course is to introduce you to basic statistics. It will cover descriptive statistics (means and standard deviations); data exploration; basic categorical data analysis; simple linear regression and basic analysis of variance (ANOVA). The statistical package SPSS will be used to illustrate the ideas demonstrated. The course will be held in a computer laboratory allowing participants to immediately apply the material covered through a series of practical examples.

 July 2014
Tuesday 01
9:00 - COURSE - R Basics : A Statistics Short Course Website | More Information
R is a free and extremely powerful language and software environment for statistical computing, data analysis, and graphics. The course is designed for those who have no experience with R, but have a basic understanding of statistics. The course will include: Introduction to R: How to install R on your computer; basic R commands, how to use and understand the R help pages. Data: Reading in data and data manipulation; summarising data; basic statistical analysis and fitting linear models. Graphics and output: Basic plotting commands and how to customise your plots; how to export your plots and output in a user-friendly format. Functions: Writing simple functions and flow control structures.
Monday 07
7:45 - EVENT - St George's College July School Holiday Program : St George's College will again be holding its popular School Holiday Program in July. The year's entry will be grades 3 - 7. Website | More Information
Dates are 7 - 11 and 14 - 18 July 2014, 7.45 am - 5.00 pm. The holiday program provides for exciting educational days in and around the College's historic buildings and beautiful gardens. This year's entry will be expanded to cover school years 3 - 7.

The schedule starts at 7.45 each morning with breakfast in the College's Dining Hall then the day begins with a variety of activities that include the Amazing Race and Team Games, African Drumming, Cooking Lessons, Chemistry Madness, Zumba, Crime Scene at St George's and much more.

The cost is $80 per child per day casual visit or $75 per child per day for more than one child or if three or more days are booked in one week. For a booking of one week the cost is $60 per child per day. The daily price includes a high ratio of mentors to children, breakfast, lunch and tea breaks.
Tuesday 08
9:00 - COURSE - ANOVA, Linear Regression and Logistic Regression : A Short Course using SPSS Website | More Information
The course is designed for people with knowledge of basic statistics who want to learn more about regression and analysis of variance (ANOVA).

This course covers techniques that can be used to analyse data with continuous and categorical variables. The course will begin with simple linear regression and then proceed with approaches that can be used with more than two variables such as multiple regression. ANOVA with interactions and blocking will also be covered. The course will end with techniques that address the analysis of binary or ordinal variables.
Monday 14
9:00 - COURSE - Applied Structural Equation Models : A Short Course using Mplus Website | More Information
The course is designed as an applied course in Structural Equation Modelling (SEM) using the Mplus software package. SEM is used widely by researchers to test complex relationships among observed (measured) and latent (unobserved) variables and subsumes other analytical techniques such as regression, path analysis, factor analysis, and canonical correlation. Mplus is rapidly becoming the program of choice for the analysis of SEMs. Mplus offers a general modelling framework that allows both the modelling of cross-sectional and longitudinal data using observed variables that are a combination of continuous and categorical variables. In addition, Mplus analyses multilevel modelling structures.

The first three days of the course will be an introduction to SEM and the Mplus program. The focus of the last two days of the course is on the analysis of more advanced SEM models.

If you are familiar with the Mplus program and have an understanding of material typically covered in an introduction to SEM course, you may choose to attend only the last two days of the course.

If you have completed an introductory course in SEM using another program (e.g., Amos, Lisrel, EQS) but have not previously used the Mplus program, you may choose to attend the first day and then the last two days of the course.
Wednesday 23
9:00 - COURSE - Introduction to Statistics : A Short Course using Microsoft Excel Website | More Information
This course aims to provide you with an introduction to the facilities available in MS Excel from a statistical point of view. As well as an introduction to Excel, spreadsheet functions and graphics, it concentrates on performing basic statistical methods, producing charts and tables, and discusses the limitations of Excel when it comes to more complex statistical analysis.

 August 2014
Friday 08
11:00 - SEMINAR - The Behavioural Gap for Organic Food in Britain: Data from a Canterbury Case Study : Dr Adelina Gschwandtner, University of Kent More Information
The present paper attempts to bring further evidence on the behavioural gap for organic food in Britain. The stated preferences are analysed with the contingent valuation method while the revealed preferences are estimated with the hedonic pricing method. We find a small but significant gap in the premium for organic food between stated and revealed preferences. This gap may suggest a need for price premium intervention. The estimated price elasticity for organic products is on average above one (in absolute value) suggesting that subsidizing the consumption of organic products could be very effective and have a strong impact.

Adelina Gschwandtner obtained her PhD in 2002, at the University of Vienna.  She subsequently worked at the University of Vienna until 2011, before moving to the Vienna University of Economics and Business. She joined the University of Kent in September 2012. Adelina's research interests lie in the field of empirical Industrial Organization. Her two main research areas are Profit Persistence and Sunk Costs. She has analysed the pattern and the determinants of profit persistence in the US and the UK over the last 50 years. More recently she has worked on the determinants of profit persistence in the European food sector, and plans to analyse the relationship between food and health. Her papers in this area have been published in Economic Inquiry, Applied Economics, International Journal of Economics and Business and The Manchester School.
Sunday 10
10:00 - OPEN DAY - 2014 Open Day : Join us for our Open Day and experience all that UWA has to offer Website | More Information
Come and find out about UWA’s undergraduate and postgraduate courses, scholarship opportunities, outstanding career options and explore our community programs and facilities.

This year there will be campus tram tours, hands-on activities, live music and entertainment, as well as plenty of fun activities for the whole family to enjoy.

Join us for Open Day 2014 from 10.00am to 4.00pm on Sunday 10 August.
Friday 15
11:00 - SEMINAR - The world in the eyes of a Luenberger development indicator: Who is moving faster in the new century? : Associate Professor Atakelty Hailu Website | More Information
This study relies on production theory to construct Luenberger indicators for quality of living across countries. Compared to the famous Human Development Index (HDI), which uses simple weights to average over outcomes, the Luenberger indicator uses a best-practice or frontier approach to the problem thus avoiding the need for ad hoc weighting. Further, the new indicator can be used to incorporate a wider set of outcomes relating to corruption, democratic rights and peace. Both nonparametric (DEA) and stochastic directional distance function frontiers were used to construct the underlying frontier. Our country rankings are compared to rankings based on the HDI. Some countries are graded down heavily relative to the HDI, and these also happen to be nations that are currently suffering from massive upheavals. Finally, the study undertakes a comparison of improvements between 2000 and 2011 using an equivalent productivity change measure to identify nations that are making the most progress.

Atakelty is an Associate Professor in the School of Agricultural and Resource Economics at The University of Western Australia (UWA). He obtained a BSc degree from Alemaya (Haremaya) University (1990) and a PhD from the University of Alberta (1998). Atakelty has won several awards for his academic achievements and has published papers in premier journals. Before joining UWA in 2001, Atakelty had worked at Alemaya and the University of Alberta. His current research interests are diverse and include efficiency and productivity analysis, bioeconomic modelling, environmental policy and auction design, and agent-based modeling (computational economics). Atakelty is also the author of APEAR, a new R package for productivity and efficiency analysis in R.
Friday 22
11:00 - SEMINAR - Consumer choices in fast-food chain restaurants: the role of information : Assistant Professor James Fogarty, School of Agricultural & Resource Economics Website | More Information
The research question for this study was to determine the impact of providing menu item energy content information at the point of sale on consumer choices at Australian fast-food chain restaurants. To answer the research question data was collected via an on-line survey. Specifically, a sample of 1,600 members of the Australian adult population made menu selections from representative fast-food restaurant menus under different information conditions.

To analyse the data a linear mixed model was estimated. The analysis found that providing information on the energy content of menu items at the point of sale results in consumers selecting menu items that, on average, have a lower energy content. In males the effect is statistically significant, but in females the effect is not. Compared to the baseline of no information on energy content, when energy content information was displayed using an absolute KJ format, the average energy content of menu selections fell by 191KJ for males and 63KJ for females. When energy content information was displayed using a %RDI format, the average energy content of menu selections fell by 233KJ for males and 5KJ for females.

Mandating the provision of energy content information at the point of sale in fast-food chain restaurants in Australia would impose costs on business, but would also provide additional information to consumers that is valuable; and would also, potentially, generate a reduction in health system expenditure. Some exploratory analysis on costs and benefits finds that the benefits to consumers from more information, and the potential savings in terms of health system expenditures, are likely to be greater than the cost on business of a regulation mandating the provision of energy content information at the point of sale.

12:00 - SEMINAR - Economics Discipline Seminar : Instrument endogeneity, weak identification, and inference in IV regressions Website | More Information
Thursday 28
18:30 - PUBLIC LECTURE - Is Bitcoin really a currency? : A public lecture with Professor David Yermack from New York University More Information
Bitcoin is a "virtual currency” made possible by the internet. One attraction for many is that the creation and use of Bitcoin as a currency is that is independent of any bank. But, is Bitcoin a valid currency or is it a speculative investment? Professor David Yermack provides an informed, unbiased perspective on this issue.

Professor Yermack is the Albert Fingerhut Professor of Finance and Business Transformation at New York University Stern School of Business and also Director, Pollack Center New York University School of Law.
Friday 29
12:00 - SEMINAR - Economics Discipline Seminar : A New Formulation for Latent Class Models More Information

 September 2014
Saturday 06
15:30 - CONCERT - Beethoven: A Tale of Triumph : Selections from Beethoven's piano sonatas performed by Perth's mightiest pianists! Website | More Information
Beethoven: A Tale of Triumph Concert - to be held at St George's College as part of their Spring Concert Series. The concert will see a selection from Beethoven's piano sonatas including the famous Moonlight Sonata performed by Perth's mightiest pianists! Performing: Mark Coughlan, Caroline Badnall, Raymond Yong, Anastasia Buettner-Moore, Rachel Chan, Stephen Armstrong. Free admission, bookings required.
Friday 12
12:00 - SEMINAR - Economics Discipline Seminar : Litigation as a Tournament More Information
This paper analyzes civil litigation between a plaintiff and a defendant who exert costly effort in a tournament game. In the unique Nash equilibrium the litigant with the stronger case is more likely to win, but there is distortion in the sense that the equilibrium probability of success is closer to 0.5 than the prior is. A cost-shifting rule determines the proportion of the winner's costs recoverable from the loser. An increase in the proportion of recoverable costs reduces distortion to the inherent strength of the case, but it also reduces the total welfare of the litigants because it increases litigation costs. In a modified litigation game with judicial management, a judge chooses the optimal cost-shifting rule to minimize both private costs spent on litigation and distortion to inherent strength of the case. In the unique subgame perfect equilibrium, the judge's choice of optimal proportion of recoverable costs increases with the relative weight which she assigns to distortion and with the weight given to the inherent strength of the case. Litigation is less likely to take place as the relative weight which the judge assigns to distortion increases.

Keywords: Tournament Theory, Litigation Process, Legal Dispute. JEL Classi cation: C72, C79, K41.
Tuesday 16
9:00 - SEMINAR - The 7 Secrets of Highly Successful Research Students : The key habits underlying success and enjoyment of a research degree will be covered. Website | More Information
This workshop is for research students who would like to be more effective in their studies.

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