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Today's date is Saturday, August 15, 2020
Academic Events
 August 2018
Thursday 02
12:00 - SEMINAR - Bayliss Seminar Series : Exploring differential mortality rates of West Australian Indigenouse breast cancer patients More Information

16:00 - SEMINAR - Seminar - Wastewater treatment, disposal and non-potable reuse via aquifer infiltration : Dr Mike Donn, 2 August, 4pm Website | More Information
Treated wastewater (TWW) is infiltrated into aquifers via infiltration ponds for disposal and non-potable reuse at many wastewater treatment plants across WA. Infiltration, a form of Managed Aquifer Recharge (MAR), provides water quality improvement of TWW associated with natural processes during infiltration and within the aquifer. A collaborative research project between the CSIRO and Water Corporation analysed decades of historical groundwater and TWW quality data using a probabilistic modelling approach to evaluate TWW contaminant removal efficiency via aquifer treatment.

The analysis of TWW infiltration sites with long-term operational data will be presented providing evidence that with appropriate wastewater treatment, recharge volume and aquifer characteristics, contaminants may be substantially attenuated via aquifers.

Dr Mike Donn is a Research Scientist with CSIRO. Since joining CSIRO in 2006 his research has been focused on understanding biogeochemical transformations in shallow groundwater systems in urban and peri-urban settings. His current research interests lie in the application of environmental chemistry to understanding the impacts of using treated wastewater for Managed Aquifer Recharge, in particular the natural attenuation in shallow groundwater and the potential benefits for non-potable reuse and the environment.

Debbie Reed and Arron Lethorn from the Water Corporation will also be available for questions


18:00 - PUBLIC TALK - Finding our Place in the Universe : The 2018 George Seddon Memorial Lecture by Professor David Blair Website | More Information
The 2018 George Seddon Memorial Lecture by David Blair, Emeritus Professor, ARC Centre of Excellence for Gravitational Wave Discovery.

Over less than two human lifetimes, discoveries in physics transformed the world and our sense of place in the universe. We harnessed electromagnetic waves, thereby shrinking our planet to a village; an infinitesimal speck in a vast and inflating universe. After a long struggle, we learnt how to detect waves of space, gravitational waves, which allow us to hear the universe, thereby changing our sense of the universe once again. Each wave of discovery re-emphasises our transient and improbable existence in an equally transient universe. Our treasure, which is our life and our planet, grows in value as each successive discovery uncovers more and more threads on which our existence depends.

Gravitational science has linked Western Australia to the world and to the whole universe. Einstein’s revolutionary theory of gravity was created while Western Australians were fighting in the first world war. In 1920 while Western Australia was still mourning those killed and wounded, Professor Alexander Ross, Foundation Professor of Physics at UWA campaigned for an international expedition to test Einstein’s extraordinary new theory during an eclipse of the Sun, best seen at Wallal Downs in the Kimberley. Two years later under instructions from Prime Minister Billy Hughes, a Trans Australian steam train carried a team of US astronomers and huge telescopes through Kalgoorlie and Guildford, en route to Wallal Downs. They provided the first indisputable proof of Einstein’s prediction that space is warped by matter.

On 15th September 2015, a vast explosion of gravitational waves was detected by an International team that included more than 20 West Australians. They shared in the world’s richest science prize. The gold that enriched Western Australia was itself a mystery: where is gold created? In 2017 the same team heard a long drawn out siren sound of rippling space - the signature of colliding neutron stars. In their final crash, they slung out blobs of neutrons that exploded like a vast atomic bomb. The Zadko telescope at UWA’s Gingin Centre and many other telescopes observed this explosion and the tell-tale signature of gold.

The annual George Seddon Lecture is sponsored by the UWA Institute of Advanced Studies and UWA’s Friends of the Grounds.
Friday 03
11:00 - SEMINAR - Asian Studies Seminar : Craft Production and Transmission of Craftsmanship in China More Information
Exploring the evolution of artefacts and related behaviours (e.g., artefact production) spatio-temporally is a long-standing issue for both archaeologists and cultural historians. In the modern world, the survival of traditional craftsmanship and corresponding craft production are significantly challenged by urbanization, industrialization, and globalization. Examining traditional contexts of change allows a comparison of past and present transformations in craftsmanship. It helps reveal change at the social, cultural, economic, and ideological levels, and further helps our understanding of the significance of contemporary developments and changes in craft manufacturing. This discussion foregrounds my thesis, which aims to identify how Chinese craft production is changing and whether this poses a threat to any aspect of Chinese intangible cultural heritage. The presentation is based on a completed historical review of the craft production and transmission of craftsmanship in traditional China (from prehistory to 1959). It will discuss production processes of two crafts (porcelain and textile) in traditional China based on a structural Marxist model of society. It will examine how in different periods craftsmanship was transmitted, in which mode, and what affected the craftsmanship transmission.

13:00 - PERFORMANCE - UWA Music presents: Free Lunchtime Concert | Alan Lourens (Euphonium) More Information
Be transported from the everyday by our free lunchtime concert series, featuring the best musical talent from within the UWA Conservatorium of Music and around the country.

The lunchtime concert series resumes this week with a special performance by Head of the Conservatorium, Professor Alan Lourens. Alan will perform some virtuosic works for Euphonium accompanied by Gaby Gunders on piano.

PROGRAM

'Beautiful Colorado' - Joseph De Luca

'Zanette' - Percy Code

'A Cold Mist Over the Cypress Tree' for unaccompanied Euphonium - Philip Wilby

'Variations on a Neapolitan Song' - Herman Bellstedt

Entry is free - no bookings required

14:30 - SEMINAR - Anthropology and Sociology Seminar : Queer Mobilities: Social Normativities, Narratives of Geographic and Social Mobility and LGBTQ youth identity More Information
Social, cultural and archival knowledge frameworks have historically made sense of sexually-diverse youth through a concept of mobility in order to achieve community belonging. Specifically, the conceptual stories of queer youth coming out, transitions to adulthood, social engagement and identity stability are stories marked by narratives of movement from rural to urban areas, from small town to larger town and from mid-size city to large city as a so-called ‘gay mecca’. Although the story of “queer youth mobility into adulthoods of belonging” continues to be circulated in popular culture, personal accounts of coming out shared online and in self-help guidance and community-sponsored suicide prevention sites such as the It Gets Better videos, recent empirical work reveals some of the ways in which young people have a more complex, nuanced understanding of mobility, migration, rural/urban relations and expectations related to minority community. This paper examines a range of instances of queer youth mobility related in participant interviews and focus groups undertaken for the ARC Discovery Queer Generations project. Examining two generations (those born in the 1970s and those in the 1990s) from three small Australian towns and three Australian state capital cities, the veracity of the message of queer youth mobility is interrogated. The paper will discuss some of the ways in which young people think about mobility and belonging, and the relationship between geographic mobility and social mobility.

16:00 - EVENT - Groups and Combinatorics Seminar: Gordon Royle, 4pm Aug 3 in Weatherburn LT More Information
Speaker: Gordon Royle (University of Western Australia)

Title: Online Collaborative LaTeX Authoring with Overleaf

Time and place: 4pm Friday 03 Aug 2018, Weatherburn LT

Abstract: This seminar is in the (very) occasional CMSC Technical Seminar Series covering useful computational tools for mathematicians.

All of us have extensive collaborations both locally and internationally, and face the logistical challenge of coordinating the efforts of multiple authors in different time zones, on different operating systems and with differing levels of technical interest and acumen.

For many of us, the emergence of Dropbox was the first technical development since the advent of email that changed our collaboration habits, pushing us from “revise-and-reply” to the “shared folder” paradigm.

Over the last 5 or so years, web technologies have advanced greatly, and a number of fully online LaTeX editing platforms (using a web browser as the GUI) have been developed. After a half-decade of launches, name-changes and mergers, one platform, namely Overleaf, is now clearly dominant, both in total numbers of users and range of services offered.

In this seminar, I will briefly describe various collaboration paradigms, give their pros and cons, before giving a fairly extensive introduction to / demonstration of Overleaf.

As with Dropbox, there is always some concern about entrusting one’s work to some initially-unknown remote server, and as with Dropbox, Overleaf’s free service provides something useful enough to engage your attention, but with key limitations that only a paid subscription will remove.
Wednesday 08
18:00 - PUBLIC TALK - Three Kinds of Clay, Three Kinds of Antiquity? : The 2018 Tom Stannage Memorial Lecture Website | More Information
The 2018 Tom Stannage Memorial Lecture by Ann McGrath AM, the Kathleen Fitzpatrick ARC Laureate Fellow and Distinguished Professor, School of History, Australian National University

In this memorial lecture, Professor McGrath will focus upon the story of how ‘Terra Australis’ or ‘Sydneia’ - Linnaean classifications for Sydney’s ‘primitive earth’ – became an agent in the importation of Anglo-Hellenic antiquity. What might such clay stories, replete with alluring female figures, reveal about plans to transform a strange earth? How could a fantastically storied antiquity, with it super-corporeal characters, co-exist with the Enlightenment’s fascination with science? Do Indigenous songlines provides clues? And how might such questions relate to the more recent articulations of deep human pasts associated with ancient places like Lake Mungo and the many sites currently being researched in Western Australia?

The 2018 Tom Stannage Memorial Lecture - This memorial lecture commemorates the exceptional contribution made by Professor Tom Stannage (1944-2012) to the Western Australian community. Professor Stannage was a prominent Australian historian who worked hard to foster a wider understanding of Western Australian history and heritage. He is remembered as an inspiring teacher and a passionate advocate for the study of history.
Thursday 09
18:00 - TALK - Just Not Cricket. Aspects of the ball tampering saga Website | More Information
A panel discussion presented by the UWA School of Human Sciences (Exercise and Sport Science) and the UWA Institute of Advanced Studies.

Why Tamper? Understanding the aerodynamics of a cricket ball - Professor Andrew Cresswell, Head, School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences and Professor of Biomechanics/Neurophysiology at The University of Queensland and 2018 UWA Institute of Advanced Studies Visiting Fellow.

Professor Cresswell will present an overview of how a cricket ball behaves in flight. Particular focus will be on the material properties and characteristics of the ball. This will lead to a description of the aerodynamics of a stationary and rotating cricket ball. The aerodynamic effects of the ball’s surface properties and speed will be discussed.

The Law: caught and bowled - Dr Tony Buti, Member for Armadale, WA State Parliament and Honorary Fellow, Law School, The University of Western Australia.

In this talk Dr Buti will provide a commentary on the law of cricket and the process leading to the sanctions imposed on Steve Smith, David Warner and Cameron Bancroft, then move on to discussing issues of sporting contracts, sports tribunals and behavioural misconduct by athletes.

Caught out: a perspective on ethical behaviour in sport - Associate Professor Sandy Gordon, The University of Western Australia, Registered Sport Psychologist.

Dr Gordon will present a critical perspective on the topic, which explains behaviour in professional sport from a rarely considered ideological viewpoint, and comment on social psychological factors such as apparent misuse of power, group think and risky shift phenomena. Suggestions for sport organisations on value-proofing will be offered and also his personal opinion on the ‘character-building and sport’ relationship.

18:00 - PUBLIC TALK - Sleep, Body Clocks and Health: biology to new therapeutics Website | More Information
A public lecture by Russell Foster, Professor of Circadian Neuroscience, Senior Fellow Brasenose College, University of Oxford and 2018 UWA Institute of Advanced Studies Visiting Fellow.

Our internal 24 hour biological clock (circadian clock) and daily sleep processes interact to play an essential, yet poorly recognised, role in our lives. Sleep is not just the simple suspension of physical movement but is an active state when the brain coordinates indispensable activities that define our ability to function whilst awake. The quality of our sleep profoundly influences our cognition, levels of social interaction, empathy, alertness, mood, memory, physical strength, susceptibility to infection, and every other aspect of our waking biology. We are beginning to understand how these critical processes are generated and regulated and many surprising findings have surfaced. For example, until recently it seemed inconceivable to most vision researchers and ophthalmologists that there could be an unrecognised type of light sensor within the eye. Yet we now know that there exists a “3rd class” of photoreceptor in the eye that detects the dawn/dusk cycle and which sets the internal clock to the solar day. The past decade has witnessed remarkable progress in understanding how the brain generates and regulates our daily patterns of sleep and wake. In parallel with this understanding, there has been a growing realisation that our sleep and circadian rhythms cannot be ignored in our headlong dash to generate a 24/7 society. This presentation will review the biology of sleep and circadian rhythms, what happens when these systems go wrong and how recent discoveries are allowing new therapeutics to be developed that will help correct abnormal patterns of sleep and wake.
Friday 10
12:00 - SEMINAR - Bayliss Seminar : Engineering resilience to green biotechnology More Information

13:00 - PERFORMANCE - UWA Music presents: Free Lunchtime Concert | Suzanne Wijsman (cello) and Martina Liegat (piano) More Information
Be transported from the everyday by our free lunchtime concert series, featuring the best musical talent from within the UWA Conservatorium of Music and around the country.

This week, Head of Strings Suzanne Wijsman joins forces with Martina Liegat to perform some beautiful works for cello and piano including: Cui 'Deux Morceaux, No. 1', Dvorák 'Silent Woods', and Brahms 'Sonata in E minor'

Entry is free - no bookings required
Sunday 12
10:00 - OPEN DAY - UWA Open Day 2018 : Everything you need to know about university, all in one place. Website | More Information
UWA’s Open Day is the best way to get a feel for life at uni. Everything you could ever want to know is right there for you, from info about our unique course structure and career opportunities to details about student clubs and accommodation.

Our stunning campus will be buzzing with activities, displays, entertainment and more, and there’ll be staff and students on hand to answer your questions.

You can be a future student, a parent, a teacher…well, just about anyone. All you need is a sense of curiosity and excitement.

So drop by on Sunday 12 August – you never know what you might learn.

Find out more at uwa.edu.au/openday

#UWAOpenDay
Monday 13
18:00 - PUBLIC TALK - Black Bodies, White Gold: cotton, art and the materiality of race Website | More Information
A public lecture by Anna Arabindan-Kesson, Assistant Professor of Black Diasporic Art, Princeton University.

This talk examines the visual relationship between the cotton trade and the representation of blackness in American culture, using historical case studies and contemporary art. Juxtaposing contemporary interventions with historical moments, it examines how cotton materially influenced the way black Americans were seen, and represented themselves, as both enslaved and free. It argues that tracing this relationship deepens our understanding of the intersections of vision, value and subjectivity in the production of racial identity in nineteenth-century America, and also today.
Tuesday 14
13:00 - SEMINAR - Political Science and International Relations Seminar : Donald Trump and the ANZUS Alliance: Strategic culture and the politics of path dependence More Information
An enduring feature of Australia’s strategic policy is the alliance with the United States. Australian policymakers have made major material contributions in support of this relationship over the years, despite an absence of direct strategic threats and the fact that its economic relationship with China has become increasingly important. The paper analyses the context in which Australian strategic policy is embedded and the forces that inform policy choices. It is suggested that the institutionalization of Australia’s distinctive strategic culture imparts a degree of path dependency to strategic policy that makes significant change unlikely despite a rapidly evolving external environment, despite the fact that the impact of the Trump Administration’s policies has been broadly negative from Australia’s perspective.

19:00 - TALK - A Life of Adventure : Friends of the Library Talk More Information
Cyril, was a journalist on The West Australian for 36 years, 25 of them as crime reporter.

He has covered assignments in Libya's Sahara Desert, Afghanistan, New Guinea, Central Borneo, Nepal and Japan to name but a few.

He searched for and found a lost tribe of Penans in Borneo; walked the Kokoda Trail; traced the "poppy trail" through the "Golden Triangle"; got into Kabul only days before tribal warfare broke out and was on assignment in Hiroshima during that city's 50th anniversary of the atomic bomb attack.

Since leaving The West Australian 26 years ago, he has written 21 books, and has just published his autobiography, “Chameleon – Reporter at Large.”

RSVP: Kathryn Maingard – [email protected] or 08 6488 2356 https://www.eventbrite.com/e/a-life-of-adventure-by-cyril-ayris-tickets-48398997705

Members: Free, Guests: $5 donation
Wednesday 15
13:00 - EVENT - Measuring your research performance (humanities and social sciences focus) Website | More Information
Applying for grants, tenure or promotion? Want to monitor your research performance? Find:

Evidence of quality for journals in which you have published – journal rankings, inclusion on esteemed journals lists.

Citation numbers for individual publications (Google Scholar, Web of Science and Scopus).

Your h-index – a measure of the productivity and citation impact of your published body of work (Google Scholar, Web of Science and Scopus).

Australian and international Library holdings for books or book chapters.

Altmetrics for individual publicationse.g. downloads numbers, social media mentions.

Media mentions.
Thursday 16
16:00 - SEMINAR - Mathematics and Statistics colloquium : Bounding the number of symmetries of a graph More Information
Graphs (also called networks) with a high degree of symmetry are particularly nice objects to study mathematically. When studying the symmetries of a graph it is often useful to look at the local symmetries, that is, those that fix a particular vertex.  An important question then becomes whether or not we can bound the number of these local symmetries. After a gentle introduction to the area, I will outline some of the results in this direction and their consequences.

16:00 - SEMINAR - Archaeology Seminar : Collecting the West: The Captain Matthew McVicker-Smyth Collection More Information
‘Collecting the West’ is an ARC funded research project that looks at what’s been collected from Western Australia with a particular focus on collecting practices. This focus enables exploration of the role of collections in identity formation, place making and the production of knowledge. The project’s time span, which reaches as far back as the 1600s and as recently as the present, also locates these collecting practices with the contexts of imperialism, colonialism and the development of State based identities as well as across disciplinary divides. In this paper, we will talk about the discovery of five photographs in 2018 in the State Library of Western Australia which led to the discovery of a forgotten private museum housing the collection of Captain Matthew McVicker-Smyth in early 20th century Perth. Captain Smyth was responsible for the selling of Nobel explosives used by agriculture and the mining industry. The museum contained mineral specimens in cases alongside extensive, aesthetically organised displays of Australian Aboriginal artifacts, amidst a wide variety of ornaments and decorative paintings. The museum reflects a moment in the history of colonialism that reminds us today of forms of dispossession, of how Aboriginal people were categorised in Australia by Western worldviews, and the ways that collectors operated. The research brings back into existence a significant Western Australian museum and opens up a new discussion of how such private collections came into existence and what their legacy might be today.

18:00 - EVENT - The ‘Civitas Pia’ of Pope Pius IV (1561-1565) Website | More Information
Permittitur tamen - It’s Ok to Grow Artichokes There. The ‘Civitas Pia’ of Pope Pius IV (1561-1565)

A public lecture by Roger Vella Bonavita, Honorary Senior Research Fellow, The University of Western Australia

The Medici Pope Pius IV (1559-1565) built the suburb now called Borgo Pio (originally named Civitas Pia) and the third enceinte of Castel S. Angelo, also completing the enceinte around the Vatican (unfinished since 1532). He also planned to replace Aurelian’s ancient walls (18 kilometres long) around Rome with gunpowder fortifications.

Capitano Francesco Laparelli da Cortona, a brilliant but obscure Tuscan engineer, was put in charge of these projects by his patron and friend Gabrio Serbelloni; a nephew of Pius IV, governor of Rome, and superintendent of the fortifications in the papal states who was himself a distinguished soldier and military engineer. The role of the pope himself, even in technical discussions, is important too. These projects must be seen in the context of the crying need for up to date defences to enable the papacy to maintain its independence against pressures from Spain (and France).

This illustrated public lecture will highlight the fascinating story of the preparation of the new urban area: which involved levelling the site, demolishing the ninth century church of S. Maria Traspontina and its adjacent Carmelite monastery besides laying out the streets, sewers, water supply and civic buildings and finally the building regulations promulgated by Pius IV for his Civitas Pia in the Bull Romanorum decet Pontificem (August 1565), which for very good reasons specifically permitted the cultivation of artichokes outside the walls of the new city.

Pius sent Laparelli to Malta in November 1565 to assist the Order of St John after it survived a four month siege by the Ottoman Turks. There he designed and built a new fortified capital called Valletta.

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