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Academic Events
 July 2012
Tuesday 03
18:05 - SEMINAR - ANZIAM Meeting/Seminar : Effects of passive porous walls on the instability of hypersonic boundary layers Website | More Information
Passive porous walls have been investigated as a means for delaying transition to turbulence in hypersonic flow. Here a theoretical linear stability analysis will be presented to consider the effect of a porous wall on the first (viscous) instability mode of a hypersonic boundary-layer flow over a sharp slender cone. The effect of curvature and of the attached shock is included for axisymmetric and non-axisymmetric disturbances. The flow in the hypersonic boundary layer is coupled to the flow in the porous layer. Asymptotic methods are used for large Reynolds number and large Mach number. The linear results for neutral stability and spatial instability will be presented for physical parameters and porous wall models, chosen to correspond to relevant experiments. The effects of varying the porous wall parameters will be shown. A weakly nonlinear stability analysis has been carried out allowing an equation for the amplitude of disturbances to be derived. The coefficients of the terms in the amplitude equation determine the effects of nonlinearity. The stabilising or destabilising effect of nonlinearity is found to depend on the cone radius. The presence of porous walls significantly influences the effect of nonlinearity.
Thursday 05
18:00 - SCREENING - The Quest of Jimmy Pike (1990, 51 Minutes, G) : Free Film Screening More Information
The Quest of Jimmy Pike demonstrates the extraordinary life of internationally renowned artist Jimmy Pike, a Walmajarri man who became an artist through the most unlikely of circumstances. The film depicts Jimmy Pike’s introduction to art and the story behind the man that became an Australian icon.

The Lawrence Wilson Art Gallery will be open in the evening from 5-6pm for a special viewing of the exhibition prior to the film.

Limited seating, please RSVP by Friday 29 June to Alexandra Tough on [email protected] or (08) 6488 3079
Monday 09
13:00 - VISITING SPEAKER - Towards a blueprint of leaf development in C3 and C4 plants : The establishment of the C4 syndrome requires alterations in leaf anatomy, biochemistry and leaf development. More Information
We hypothesize that the massive changes in C4/C3 related gene expression are controlled by a subset of transcriptional regulators, which are essential for C4 photosynthesis establishment and/or maintenance. We analyze the Cleome genus, which includes closely related C4 (Cleome gynandra) and C3 (Cleome hassleriana) species and exhibits phylogenetic proximity to the model species Arabidopsis thaliana.In order to elucidate the regulatory network behind the C4 syndrome in Cleome we are employing two strategies: (i) A single candidate gene approach derived from a global comparative analysis of transcriptome data sets of C4/C3 species (including Cleome hassleriana and gynandra) generated by 454 and Solexa sequencing, which targets will be further described biochemically and genetically (e.g. via over-expressor and knock-out lines in Arabidopsis thaliana) and (ii) co-expression analysis for the identification of the regulatory modules which will include a developmental gradient of photosynthetic and a subset of non-photosynthetic tissues.

16:00 - VISITING SPEAKER - "India’s Enigmatic Policy towards Iran" by Professor P.R. Kumaraswamy : For close to a decade Iran has emerged as the most controversial and contested dimension of India’s foreign policy. The bonhomie that was visible following the end of the Cold War gave way to disputes, tensions and above all excessive US intervention. More Information
Synopsis: While some of the problems were external and hence beyond the control of both these countries, Iran has not been an easy customer and India’s ability to pursue energy security relations with Tehran has been compounded by a host of bilateral disputes and tension. Until Iran resolves its dispute with the wider international community, the Indo-Iranian relations would continue to be uneven and unpredictable.

17:30 - SCREENING - Scarlet Road (Director's Cut) Screening and Q&A : Sex Work, Sexual Citizenship, Disability, Urban Planning Website | More Information
Scarlet Road follows the extraordinary work of Australian sex worker, Rachel Wotton. Impassioned about freedom of sexual expression and the rights of sex workers, she specialises in a long-overlooked clientele – people with disability. This screening will feature the Director's Cut of Scarlet Road (70mins) and will be followed by a Q&A session featuring Rachel Wotton, Dr Gareth Merriman (WA Sexology Society) and Dr Paul Maginn (UWA, Urban and Regional Planning). The Q&A session seeks to highlight and explore the various public policy issues, especially urban planning, health and law, that surround sex work, sexual citizenship and the sexual aspirations and needs of people with disabilities.

There is a cost to attend this event with all proceeds being donated to Touching Base Inc and the Fred Hollows Foundation. Tix can be purchased from - https://www.trybooking.com/BPCK
Tuesday 10
12:00 - SEMINAR - School of Chemistry and Biochemistry Seminar : From Molecular Motors To Fungal Intelligence More Information
Protein molecular motors are natural nano-machines that convert the chemical energy obtained from the hydrolysis of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) into mechanical work which is central to cellular motion, muscle contraction, cell division and a multitude of other critical biological processes. Remarkably, protein molecular motors differ fundamentally from artificial devices in that the conversion from chemical energy to mechanical energy is done directly, rather than via an intermediary state as in e.g., heat for thermal engines. This fundamental difference results in a far better efficiency (close to 100%, for both linear and rotary motors) of these natural mechanical devices compared to artificial ones. This exceptional efficiency, together with the small scale of protein molecular motors, has prompted an increasing number of studies focused on their integration in hybrid micro- and nanodevices. However, and despite tremendous progress in the engineering of molecular motors, much needs to be learnt from Nature, in particular regarding the cooperative behaviour of molecular motors in vivo, before coming even close to efficiency in in vitro devices.

Filamentous fungi are very successful in colonizing micro-confined maze-like networks (e.g., soil, wood, leaf litter, plant and animal tissues), suggesting that they may be efficient solving agents of geometrical problems. The growth behaviour and optimality of space-searching algorithms of several fungal species has been tested in microfluidic mazes and networks. First, it was found that the growth behaviour of all species was strongly modulated by the geometry of micro-confinement. Second, the fungi used a complex growth and space-searching strategy comprising two algorithmic subsets: (i) long-range directional memory of individual hyphae and (ii) inducement of branching by physical obstruction. Third, stochastic simulations using experimentally measured parameters showed that this strategy maximizes both survival and biomass homogeneity in micro-confined networks, producing optimal results only when both algorithms are synergistically
Wednesday 11
13:00 - WORKSHOP - UWA Moodle : LMS Upgrade! Attend a demonstration session More Information
The UWA LMS (Moodle) has been successfully upgraded to Version 2.2. We now invite you to attend a demonstration session which will highlight the new features. We look forward to seeing you there.

16:00 - SEMINAR - “Establishing stem cell lines from mammary and lung tissue – plating at the University of Melbourne and waiting at Melbourne Park” Website | More Information
George Yeoh has a long standing interest in liver stem cells, specifically liver progenitor cells (LPCs) which are bipotential and able to generate hepatocytes and cholangiocytes in vitro and in vivo. His lab has gained valuable insight into the biology of LPCs by studying cell lines that are derived from liver using the “plate and wait” method he acquired while on sabbatical at the Pasteur Institute in Paris. In this seminar, an update on new findings on LPCs will be presented.

During the Austraian Open Tennis season, George applied the plate and wait method on cells isolated from the mammary gland by the Lisse-Labat/Visvader group at the WEHI and from the lung by the McQualter/Bertoncello group in Pharmacology at the University of Melbourne. These experiments and progress with establishing a mammary progenitor cell line and a lung progenitor cell line respectively will be discussed. Images and video from the Australian Open will also be presented.
Tuesday 17
18:00 - PUBLIC LECTURE - The Role of the Ocean in Human Evolution, History and Future Website | More Information
A public lecture by Professor Carlos M. Duarte, Director, The UWA Oceans Institute.

In this lecture, Professor Duarte will develop a case for the existence of a long relationship, at the deepest possible level, between humans and the ocean and submit that the depth of this relationship can be best understood as a close evolutionary connection between humans and the ocean.

This lecture is part of the ‘Ocean Solutions for Humanity’s Grand Challenges’ lecture series, presented by UWA’s Institute of Advanced Studies and The UWA Oceans Institute. This series of lectures will explore the ways in which safe and sustainable uses of our oceans can open a pathway of wealth and well-being through what is, in effect, our last frontier.

Cost: Free, RSVP your attendance to [email protected]
Wednesday 18
10:00 - VISITING SPEAKER - The Transition from Health to Sickness - the role of plant hormones in underpinning plant pathogen virulence strategies : Speaker will also present at CSIRO Floreat on previous day. More Information
"Our research focuses upon how the virulent bacterial phytopathogen Pseudomonas syringae establishes disease in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. P. syringae delivers a suite of ~ 30 effector proteins into the plant cell." Detailed abstract available [email protected]

12:00 - SEMINAR - School of Chemistry and Biochemistry Seminar : Towards Enzyme Enhancement Therapies for Gaucher Disease More Information
Gaucher disease (GD) is a rare genetic disorder characterized by the accumulation of β-D-glucosylceramide within the lysosomes of the cell. This occurs because of insufficient lysosomal glucocerebrosidase (GBA) activity, which is a direct result of mutations in the encoding gene. Some common GD-causing mutations do not significantly diminish GBA’s catalytic competence in a direct manner, but instead deleteriously affect folding and trafficking of the enzyme. These mutant enzymes have difficulty obtaining and retaining their native fold within the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), and so most of the enzyme undergoes ER-associated degradation rather than reaching maturity and being trafficked to the lysosome. Small molecules that bind to and stabilize correctly folded mutant enzyme within the ER may elevate the steady-state concentration of folded enzyme within this organelle and increase the amount of enzyme trafficked to lysosomes, potentially ameliorating the disease. This emerging approach to treating GD is known as enzyme enhancement therapy and requires the development of small molecule ‘pharmacological chaperones’. Efforts to develop such compounds will be detailed in this seminar.

16:00 - SEMINAR - “Allo-HLA reactivity by virus-specific memory T cells” Website | More Information
Dr Lloyd D’Orsogna is a Clinical Immunologist and fellow of both the Royal Australian College of Physicians (RACP) and Royal College of Pathologists of Australiasia (RCPA). He is a new investigator recently returned from overseas after completing his PhD studies with honours (Cum Laude) in the field of transplantation biology and immunogenetics, at the Leiden University Medical Centre, the Netherlands. His research focuses on crossreactivity of virus specific memory T-cells against allogeneic HLA molecules and has led to novel understanding of the nature of T-cell alloreactivity. He has published many papers including a key paper on the high frequency and nature of allo-HLA crossreactivity by viral specific memory T-cells published in the journal Blood (Blood 2010; 115: 3146-3157). His research has been awarded multiple prizes including the prestigious Julia Bodmer Award 2011 (Young investigator award) by the European Federation for Immunogenetics (EFI).

18:30 - SEMINAR - New Treatments in Huntington's Disease - FREE public seminar : The seminar is designed as an information and discussion session for patients, families and interested individuals Website | More Information
The management of Neurodegenerative Disorders Research Pty Ltd under the auspices of York Neuroscience Discovery Inc invite you to join us at a seminar presented by Dr Peter K Panegyres on the New Treatments in Huntington’s disease. Topics covered during the seminar include updates on the Reach to HD Study and our collaborative research conducted across Australia and the United States.

Place: The University of Western Australia Social Sciences Lecture Theatre, Hackett Drive, Crawley Date: Wednesday, 18 July, 2012 Time: 6.30 – 7.30pm Presenter: Dr Peter K Panegyres, MD, PhD, FRACP
Saturday 21
13:30 - FREE LECTURE - Roman Archaeology Group Free Lecture : Two illustrated lectures on Roman Archaeology: Palmyra, and the Roman Peloponnese Website | More Information
The Roman Archaeology Group of Perth presents two fully illustrated lectures on Roman Archaeology: Palmyra: an ancient oasis between East and West presented by Rebecca Banks; and The Roman Peloponnese presented by Kevin O'Toole. Saturday 21 July, 1:30pm at Social Sciences Lecture Theatre, UWA. Afternoon tea will be served between lectures: $7pp (RAG members) and $10pp (non-members). For more information on the RAG, please visit https://www.humanities.uwa.edu.au/research/cah/roman-archaeology
Tuesday 24
9:00 - COURSE - Linear Regression and ANOVA : A Short Course using IBM SPSS Website | More Information
The course is designed for people with knowledge of basic statistics who want to learn more about regression and analysis of variance (ANOVA).

The course is hosted by the Centre for Applied Statistics and we offer discounted rate fees to UWA Graduate Research Students.

Fee information is available on our website cas.maths.uwa.edu.au. Please register online.

15:00 - PUBLIC LECTURE - Coastal and Shelf Sediment Transport Website | More Information
A public lecture by Michael Collins, Emeritus Professor, School of Ocean and Earth Science, University of Southampton.

Michael Collins is Ikerbasque Fellow at the Plentzia Marine Station (PIE), the University of the Basque Country(UPV/EHU), Spain and Emeritus Professor in the School of Ocean and Earth Science at the University of Southampton, UK.

Professor Collins is a fellow of the Geological Society of London, and is a consultant to many national and international organisations and industrial concerns. He is currently a Gledden Visiting Senior Fellow at UWA.

Cost: Free. RSVP to [email protected]
Wednesday 25
16:00 - SEMINAR - “Turning Back the Cardiac Regenerative Clock: Lessons from the Neonate” Website | More Information
I received my Ph.D. from The University of Melbourne in 2009, where I studied the developmental origins of cardiac hypertrophy under the supervision of Prof. Lea Delbridge and Prof. Walter Thomas. Following my Ph.D., I undertook postdoctoral training at UT Southwestern Medical Center (Dallas, USA) in the laboratory of Dr. Eric Olson, where I was supported by a co-funded overseas postdoctoral fellowship from the National Health and Medical Research Council and National Heart Foundation of Australia. During the course of my postdoctoral research at UT Southwestern, I discovered that the neonatal mammalian heart has an intrinsic capacity for regeneration following injury and I subsequently received the UT Southwestern Postdoctoral Achievement Award in recognition of this work. Supported by fellowships from the NHMRC/NHF and UQ, I relocated to the University of Queensland in 2012 to head the Cardiac Regeneration Group in the School of Biomedical Sciences. My lab at UQ aims to unravel the molecular mechanisms that regulate cardiac regenerative capacity in mammals.

The inability of the adult mammalian heart to regenerate following injury represents a substantial barrier in cardiovascular medicine. Using a surgical amputation model, we recently discovered that the neonatal mammalian heart has significant regenerative potential for a short period after birth. A major unresolved question is whether the neonatal heart can also regenerate following myocardial ischaemia, the most common antecedent of heart failure in humans. Here, I will outline recent studies examining the regenerative capacity of the neonatal mouse heart following myocardial infarction and I will highlight advances in our understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms governing heart regeneration in mammals.

17:00 - EVENT - Oxford and Rhodes Information Evening : An information evening on applying to Oxford University and the Rhodes Scholarship. More Information
The Oxford University Society of Western Australia Inc. invites you to an information evening on applying to Oxford University and the Rhodes Scholarship.

Join Rachel Paterson (2011 WA Rhodes Scholar), Justin Audcent (Oxford University graduate and partner at Ernst & Young) and Caitlin Sharp (Oxford University BCL graduate and Senior Associate at Clayton Utz) for an overview of the application process and first hand knowledge of the Oxford University experience. Places are limited so make sure you RSVP soon!

Date: Wednesday, 25th July 2012

Time: 5:00pm – followed by drinks and canapes

Place: Clayton Utz Boardroom, Level 27 QV1 Building, St Georges Terrace, Perth.

RSVP to: Rebecca Brown, 9426 8520 or [email protected]


18:15 - EVENT - UWA Historical Society Annual Lecture 2012 : Mathematics and Women - 36 years at The University of Western Australia Website | More Information
The Annual Lecture is the highlight of the year for the UWA Historical Society and Convocation and we are delighted to welcome Winthrop Professor Cheryl Praeger to the podium to reflect upon her years on Campus and subsequent experiences and achievements.

Mathematician Cheryl Praeger has served the University of Western Australia as Lecturer, Senior Lecturer, and Professor since 1976. She leads a flourishing research group in pure mathematics and is in the top one per cent of highly cited mathematicians in the world.

Attendance is free.
Thursday 26
8:30 - EVENT - Quiet Day for Academics and General Staff : Time to reflect, create and renew Website | More Information
Set on a lovely bush block in Mundaring, the Quiet Day provides some space to 'be alone' in the company of other UWA academics and general staff with the intention of marking out some good quality thinking/reflection time.

There is no formal content to the day – no presentations or butcher's paper! Rather we seek to create an environment of quiet, trust and collegiality in which things become clearer and creative new ideas can emerge. This involves a combination of small group reflections on poetry (which helps slow down the pace and takes us into a deeper level of contemplation) and an extended period of silence, in which participants can rest and reflect. ‘We do less in order to achieve more’. This is not a religious event.

The principles underpinning the Quiet Day are based on the work of Parker J Palmer (The Courage to Teach), more of which can be found at: www.couragerenewal.org

Cost: $50 including lunch, morning and afternoon teas ($35 for PhD students)

A registration form can be obtained by emailing [email protected] or phone Michael for more information on 0435 065326

Registration is needed by Wednesday 4th July.

Previous participants have commented:

"this retreat provided a rare opportunity to quietly reflect on what's going on for me internally as a teacher, helped by excellent facilitators and a wonderful peaceful location"

"the benefits of this retreat to my personal and professional life have been immense"

“Thank you for the retreat - I found it really useful, have a sense of focus, realised I was missing an important work goal and came home and wrote a research paper that has been bugging me for some time” (from unsolicited email)

“it is good because it forces you to disengage in order to more fully engage – well done and many thanks”

“useful, health-giving and creative time”

“definitely go!”

“The best thing about the day was the space to think (but the whole deal was great) – yes, go. Important opportunity to reflect. Thank you to the organisers. I feel positively that UWA supported this”.

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