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Today's date is Wednesday, December 02, 2020
Science for the Community
 November 2013
Friday 01
9:00 - EVENT - SPICE PD, Regional Visits and Travelling Scientist : The Travelling Scientist accompanies the SPICE team when they visit regional schools. The Travelling Scientist, a young PhD student, talks to students about their journey in science Website | More Information
SPICE Events are designed to expose high school science teachers to exciting new science by increasing interaction between teachers and researchers at UWA. They provide the opportunity for teachers to engage in current research and learn new ideas for the classroom, and usually contain a range of activities including hands-on lab sessions, field trips or presentations showcasing cutting-edge research. We expect the heightened engagement and interaction between teachers and tertiary scientists to have a significant impact upon the enthusiasm of teachers for science.

See website for dates and further details.
Friday 29
15:00 - PUBLIC TALK - Jill Scott Artists Talk: AURALROOTS : Public lecture with current SymbioticA resident Website | More Information
AURALROOTS is a quasi-real interactive sculpture inspired by the behaviour of the outer hair cells and inner hair cells and auditory nerves of the cochlea. It combines tactile and augmented technologies with the strategies of scale to allow the viewer to hear biological and traditional stories about the way we hear on a visceral level (in the womb), on a survival level (in the landscape and on a communication level (tests in the science lab). This exploration also triggers augmented reality, visuals that can be seen on screens and changes in a display of supporting hair cells in vitro. (Collaborators: The Auditory Lab: UWA)

Jill Scott was born in Melbourne and has been working and living in Switzerland since 2003. She is Professor for Research in the Institute of Cultural Studies in Art, Media and Design at the Zurich University of the Arts (ZhdK) and Co-Director of the Artists-in-Labs Program (a collaboration with the Ministry for Culture, Switzerland), which places artists from all disciplines into physics, computer, engineering and life science labs to learn about scientific research and make creative interpretations. She is also Vice Director of the Z-Node PHD program on art and science at the University of Plymouth, UK-a program with 16 international research candidates.

Her recent publications include: Artists-in-labs Processes of Inquiry (2006 Springer/Vienna/New York) and Coded Characters Hatje Cantz (2002, Ed. Marille Hahne). She was awarded a PhD from the University of Wales (UK) and has a MA from the University of San Francisco, as well as a Degree in Education (University of Melbourne) and a Degree in Art and Design (Victoria College of the Arts). Since 1975 she has exhibited many video artworks, conceptual performances and interactive environments in USA, Japan, Australia and Europe. Her most recent works involve the construction of interactive media and electronic sculptures based on studies she has conducted in neuroscience- particularly the somatic sensory system artificial skin (e-skin) 2003-2007 and on neuro-retinal behaviour in relation to human eye disease ("The Electric Retina", 2008) and ("Dermaland", 2009).

 December 2013
Sunday 01
9:00 - EVENT - SPICE PD, Regional Visits and Travelling Scientist : The Travelling Scientist accompanies the SPICE team when they visit regional schools. The Travelling Scientist, a young PhD student, talks to students about their journey in science More Information
SPICE Events are designed to expose high school science teachers to exciting new science by increasing interaction between teachers and researchers at UWA. They provide the opportunity for teachers to engage in current research and learn new ideas for the classroom, and usually contain a range of activities including hands-on lab sessions, field trips or presentations showcasing cutting-edge research. We expect the heightened engagement and interaction between teachers and tertiary scientists to have a significant impact upon the enthusiasm of teachers for science.

See website for dates and further details.

 January 2014
Tuesday 21
16:00 - EVENT - Confucius Forum : Everything about Confucius and China More Information
Speakers:

1) Professor Li Zhongshang, Minister-Counsellor for Education, Embassy of P.R China in Australia Title: Chinese Economy and the Chinese Dream

2) Dr Liu Jingyuan, Senior Advisor, Shandong Association Title: Did the Chinese Discover Australia?

3) Professor Jan Ryan, Hon Professor, Edith Cowan University Title: Shifting Profile of Chinese Women in Australia

4) Dr Han Baolei, Senior Advisor, Shandong Association Title: Why did the Confucius Thought Emerge in Shandong Province?

 February 2014
Friday 14
15:00 - PUBLIC TALK - Applications of iPS Cells in Science and Art : Public talk with Dr Michael Edel Website | More Information
Dr. Michael Edel is an Australian with European nationality and is currently a tenure track Group Leader funded by the Ministry of Science and Innovation, Spain. He completed his Bachelor of Science with honors in Anatomy and Human Biology and Physiology, his Post-Graduate Diploma in Education and his PhD in Pathology on the role of angiogenesis in breast cancer metastasis at the University of Western Australia (UWA). He is now group leader of the Control of Pluripotency Laboratory at the University of Barcelona, Faculty of Medicine.

His team works with adult stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS cells) at a clinical grade level for research into new cell based treatments for heart disease, eye disease, neuronal disorders and spinal cord injury. The research seeks to define the role of cell cycle genes in pluripotency and cancer leading to a number of high impact publications (Nature Biotechnology 2008, Genes and Development, 2010; Stem Cells and Development, 2012). In collaboration with hospitals, he also models human disease using iPS cells, such as Retts syndrome and Atrial fibrillation to identify new directions to treat these diseases. Consequently, he is recognized as a Senior Research Fellow at University of Sydney, Faculty of Medicine, Children's Hospital, Westmead, and NSW, AUSTRALIA.

Please refer to his group’s web page for more information: https://pluripotencylaboratory.wordpress.com/
Friday 28
15:45 - FREE LECTURE - Free Lecture: Reaching new heights in astronomy: The European Southern Observatory : In this lecture, Professor Tim de Zeeuw, Director General of the ESO, will describe ESO’s current suite of programs, the telescopes that make the discoveries possible and what’s on the horizon for one of the world’s premier astronomical institutions. Website | More Information
The European Southern Observatory (ESO) is the foremost intergovernmental astronomy organisation in Europe and the world’s most productive astronomical observatory.

ESO telescopes have made some of the most significant astronomical discoveries of recent times, including the supermassive black hole at the centre of our galaxy, the most distant gamma-ray burst, the Earth-like planet Gliese 581c and the most distant galaxy ever seen by humans.

Tea and coffee from 3:45pm.

More info and a promotional poster available at www.icrar.org/events/eso-lecture

Please circulate this to friends and colleagues. Thank you!

NOT TO BE MISSED!

 March 2014
Friday 07
15:00 - PUBLIC TALK - The Rights of Rock Art: Human Entanglements with the Lives of Artefacts : Public Talk with Sven Ouzman Website | More Information
Rock art is one of Archaeology’s most varied, visible and theoretically-informed artefacts. But this ‘artefact’ (Latin: arte + factum ~ ‘thing made by [human] skill’) is not simply brought into the world by human agency. Rather, rock art is both constitutive of human-ness and leads its own life. More than simply visually spectacular imagery, rock art embodies a complex and multi-sensorial entanglement of human-stone relationships. An emerging issue for research and curation is what our human obligations towards rock art are beyond anthropocentric notions of knowledge and conservation. I propose to probe this and related issues using ancient and modern Indigenous rock arts from northern Australia and southern Africa.

Sven Ouzman's research interests include rock art, graffiti, heritage politics, Indigenous knowledge, intellectual property issues, landscape, creolisation & cross-cultural contact, monuments, origins, and understandings of time. His research in Australia, Botswana, Namibia, and South Africa has led to documenting over 2500 rock art sites- producing 234 site reports and conducting 7 excavations. Details of his publication output and curatorial work can be found at: Assoc/Prof Sven Ouzman UWA Staff Profile.
Wednesday 19
18:00 - PUBLIC TALK - How nature makes materials Website | More Information
A lecture by Professor Ullrich Steiner, Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge and Australian Academy of Science 2014 Selby Fellow.

Biological organisms have rather limited resources they can use to build the materials they are made of. Given these limitations, the range of properties of natural materials is mind-boggling, and in many instances not easily surpassed by man-made substitutes. One important aspect of many natural materials is their intricate structure, extending often from a few nanometers to macroscopic dimensions.

In this lecture Professor Steiner will discuss some recent work that illustrates what we can learn from nature: how to make structured materials and how to copy their properties. Some of the examples that Professor Steiner will cover will include: animal skeletons and sea shells; structural colour in nature; adhesion properties of insects, spiders and lizards; and self-cleaning surfaces.

Cost: Free, but RSVP required via https://www.ias.uwa.edu.au/lectures/steiner


 April 2014
Friday 11
15:00 - EVENT - Evolution of Human Communities: A Primatologist’s Perspective : Public talk with Cyril Grueter Website | More Information
One of the universal features of human sociality is the fact that our social networks are highly integrated: human societies exhibit several nested social layers including families, bands and communities. Several factors have been identified as creating disincentives for hostile intergroup relations, including economic interdependence, intermarriage and cooperative defence against external adversaries. I will explore the emergence of amicable relations between human communities and identify precursors in non-human primate societies.

Cyril Grueter completed his PhD degree in biological anthropology in 2009 at the University of Zurich/Switzerland, which was supervised by Prof. Carel van Schaik. Grueter research was aimed at understanding the evolutionary determinants of multilevel societies in primates and included 20 months of observations on wild snub-nosed monkeys in China, complemented with comparative cross-species analyses. Subsequently he worked as a postdoctoral researcher at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig/Germany and conducted a field study on the feeding ecology and feeding competition in mountain gorillas in Rwanda between 2009 and 2010 in collaboration with the Karisoke Research Center. In 2012, Grueter took up an Assistant Professor position at the School of Anatomy, Physiology and Human Biology at The University of Western Australia.
Saturday 26
16:00 - PERFORMANCE - The Science of Doctor Who : The science behind the fiction Website | More Information
From the Royal Institution of Australia and BBC Worldwide Australia & New Zealand

Join us on this amazing journey through space and time as comedian Rob Lloyd, and his crew of scientists, explore the scientific mysteries of Doctor Who.

Featuring original scenes from the iconic BBC television series, join in the fun with your smartphone as we investigate the science of time travel and teleportation, ask if regeneration is possible, and explain how the TARDIS can be bigger on the inside. You will even get an opportunity to decide which Doctor Who alien will take over the universe.

There are no limits to his adventure as we travel the cosmos to reveal The Science of Doctor Who.

Tickets $57.50 from ticketsWA.com

19:30 - PERFORMANCE - The Science of Doctor Who : The science behind the fiction Website | More Information
From the Royal Institution of Australia and BBC Worldwide Australia & New Zealand

Join us on this amazing journey through space and time as comedian Rob Lloyd, and his crew of scientists, explore the scientific mysteries of Doctor Who.

Featuring original scenes from the iconic BBC television series, join in the fun with your smartphone as we investigate the science of time travel and teleportation, ask if regeneration is possible, and explain how the TARDIS can be bigger on the inside. You will even get an opportunity to decide which Doctor Who alien will take over the universe.

There are no limits to his adventure as we travel the cosmos to reveal The Science of Doctor Who.

Tickets $57.50 from ticketsWA.com

 May 2014
Saturday 24
19:30 - PERFORMANCE - The Rap Guide to Evolution : World-class rapper with the accuracy of a scientist Website | More Information
“Astonishing...fizzing energy and spell-binding charisma!” New York Times

Combining the wit, poetry, and charisma of a great rapper with the accuracy of a scientist, Baba Brinkman takes us on a hip-hop tour of modern biology.

A smash hit at the Edinburgh Fringe, in New York, and around the world, The Rap Guide is provocative, hilarious, intelligent, and scientifically accurate.

“A total Dar-winner! As fun as it is informative ... you’ll probably sing along!” New York Post

Best for young people aged 14 and over. The show contains sexual (though scientific) references and some bad language.

Tickets available from ticketsWA.com 16s and under: $25, Adults $35 Groups of 4 or more, Adults go for $25.

SCHOOL BOOKINGS: Call the Enquiry Line 08 6488 2440 (noon-4pm, weekdays) or email [email protected] to get significant ticket savings for students and free teacher tickets for every 10 children.

 July 2014
Tuesday 29
13:20 - EVENT - The UWA Institute of Agriculture 2014 Industry Forum : Potential for Food Production in northern Western Australia Website | More Information
New agriculture is believed to play a crucial role in the regional transformation of northern Western Australia. There is significant potential for Asia-focused food production and industry to diversify northern Australia’s economy, trade and sustainable use of natural resources over the long term; and to benefit Indigenous communities, which have a significant presence in the region. It is timely to engage in a discussion on the feasibility and likely effectiveness of new agricultural development projects in this unique region of Australia, where the challenges are magnified compared to southern Australia.

For catering purposes, please RSVP by 21 July 2014 to [email protected]

 August 2014
Tuesday 05
18:30 - EVENT - Water for Society Website | More Information
The 2014 George Seddon Memorial Lecture by Anas Ghadouani, Professor of Environmental Engineering at The University of Western Australia.

Throughout the history of humanity there has always been a strong link between water and society. The most successful of our past civilisations are the ones that developed a good understanding of water management. Water and its impact on society will continue to be one of the key challenges for future generations struggling with droughts, floods and the availability of clean drinking water. In this lecture, Professor Ghadouani will outline some of the key challenges for water management in contemporary society. An articulated cross-disciplinary approach for achieving the best outcomes is especially required in a world where urban environments have been developing at a fast pace. Strategies to deal with overall change in economic and financial trends, ecological, environmental and climatic are essential for the future prosperity of our society.

This lecture will explore some of the social transformations needed to support water sensitive cities, including community attitudes and behavioural change, governance and economic assessment practices, management systems and technological innovations.

Cost: Free, but RSVP essential via https://www.ias.uwa.edu.au/lectures/ghadouani
Sunday 10
10:00 - OPEN DAY - 2014 Open Day : Join us for our Open Day and experience all that UWA has to offer Website | More Information
Come and find out about UWA’s undergraduate and postgraduate courses, scholarship opportunities, outstanding career options and explore our community programs and facilities.

This year there will be campus tram tours, hands-on activities, live music and entertainment, as well as plenty of fun activities for the whole family to enjoy.

Join us for Open Day 2014 from 10.00am to 4.00pm on Sunday 10 August.
Wednesday 13
8:00 - EVENT - Women in Agriculture Breakfast Website | More Information
Students of Natural and Agricultural Sciences (SNAGS) and The UWA Institute of Agriculture would like to invite you to a breakfast to commemorate the role of women in agriculture.
Friday 15
15:00 - PUBLIC TALK - Anthropology of Life : Classical and New Approaches : Public talk with Perig Pitrou, CNRS, Laboratoire d'anthropologie sociale, Paris Website | More Information
In contrast to Western philosophy, which, at least since Aristotle, has considered the distinction between life and the living to be fundamental, anthropology seems not to have given much thought to the difference between the two. However, the existence of an entity called ‘The One Who Makes Live’ among the Mixe, an Amerindian group living in the state of Oaxaca in Mexico, proves that ethno-theories of non-Western peoples often make the distinction between the characteristics and vital processes of living beings (growth, degeneration, reproduction, et cetera) on the one hand, and the more or less personified causes that produce them on the other. Given these circumstances, this article pursues a two-fold objective. First, based on the results of ethnographic inquiry, to try to describe the categories of non-human agents with which the Mixe understand this production or making of the living. Second, I suggest that in parallel with numerous approaches developed by anthropologists past and present, the anthropology of life would benefit from an approach based on a ‘general pragmatics’ in order to better understand the diversity of conceptions of life.

Perig Pitrou is researcher in the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Laboratoire d’anthropologogie sociale, Paris. He has carried ethnographic fieldwork in Mixe Highlands of Oaxaca, Mexico, and has written on ritual and sacrifice, ethnotheories of life and resolution of conflict. He is the co-editor of the book La noción de vida en Mesoamérica (CEMCA-UNAM). In 2013-2014, he conducted the research program "Of Living Beings and Artifacts. The interrelation of vital and technical processes". He is now deputy director of the interdisciplinary program "Domestication and Fabrication of the Living" (CNRS). Together with Dimitri Karadimas, he is organizing a seminar on "Anthropology of Life" at the Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales.
Saturday 16
15:00 - EVENT - More Than Honey - The Movie - Free Event : Fifty years ago, Einstein had already insisted on the symbiotic relationship binding these pollen gatherers to mankind: “If bees were to disappear from the globe,” he predicted, “mankind would only have four years left to live.” Website | More Information
More Than Honey is a film on the relationship between mankind and honeybees, about nature and about our future.

This documentary by the Swiss filmmaker Marcus Imhoof and narrated by John Hurt is looking into the fascinating world of bees, showing small family beekeepers (including the beekeeper of ERSTE Foundation beehive, Heidrun Singer) and industrialized honey farms.

More Than Honey is a film on the relationship between mankind and honeybees, about nature and about our future. Honeybees show us that stability is just as unhealthy as unlimited growth, that crises and disasters are triggering evolution and that salvation sometimes comes from a completely unexpected direction.
Monday 18
18:00 - PUBLIC LECTURE - Tim Jarvis - Antarctic explorer who recreated British explorer Sir Ernest Shackleton’s survival journey! : Relive Tim’s remarkable journey to retrace the steps of legendary leader Sir Ernest Shackleton. More Information
Come to a free talk and book signing by Tim Jarvis, one of the world’s leading explorers, as he describes his modern-day journey to retrace, for the first time ever, the legendary 1914 expedition of Sir Ernest Shackleton.

In early 1914, British explorer Sir Ernest Shackleton and his team sailed for Antarctica, attempting to be the first to reach the South Pole. Instead of glory, Shackleton and his crew found themselves in an epic struggle for survival: a three-year odyssey on the ice and oceans of the Antarctic that endures as one of the world’s most famous tales of adventure, endurance, and leadership ever recorded.

In the winter of 2013, celebrated explorer Tim Jarvis, a veteran of multiple polar expeditions, set out to recreate Sir Ernest Shackleton’s treacherous voyage over sea and mountain, outfitted solely with authentic equipment – clothing, boots, food, and tools – from Shackleton’s time, a feat that has never been successfully accomplished.
Friday 22
15:00 - PUBLIC TALK - Creativity: Art + Science : Public talk with Janice Lally PhD Website | More Information
A fascination with modes of thinking, the nature of creativity as well as the neuro-physiological basis of these have led me to pursue work within the domains of art and science throughout my adult life. My conviction, through my own experience, that the practices of art and science are varied dimensions of the same spectrum has driven my continuing engagement with art and science. This presentation will discuss some of the ways in which I have worked within art and science including collaborative partnerships with artists and scientists and some outcomes from these projects.

Janice Lally’s career combines art gallery and art museum directorship, management, research and curatorship with her work as an independent consultant and arts manager in the visual arts, crafts, design, public art and cultural heritage sectors in Australia, Berlin and Hong Kong since 1986. Her earlier career was as a research scientist working in biochemistry and molecular biology. She holds a MSc in Clinical Biochemistry from Flinders University. Her research at the Australian National University included Neurophysiology, Biochemistry and Zoology. Her work in molecular biology continued in Medicine and Biochemistry at UWA. Working in both the science and art arenas, she completed a BA Hons (Fine Art) at UWA and focused on full-time work in the arts. However, the passion for both domains continued. They came together again in 2003 in her PhD awarded by the University of Melbourne, Department of History and Philosophy of Science/Fine Arts for her thesis The Aboriginal Collection in the Berlin Museum of Ethnography. In 1990, as inaugural Public Art Manager for Arts South Australia, she was invited to establish the Public Art Program, which accrued national and international acclaim. Later, as Curator of Public Art for the City of Adelaide, she initiated a public art project, Sensing with Light, by John Tonkin, the interactive new media artist. This was commissioned in partnership with the Institute of Photonics and Advanced Sensing, University of Adelaide in 2010 and is now in final stages of production.

As Gallery Director and Curator at JamFactory Contemporary Craft and Design, then as Curator at Flinders University Art Museum, both in SA, Janice curated and managed numerous exhibitions. This included national and international touring exhibitions such as Ritual of Tea for the Adelaide Festival of Arts 2002, which toured to Object Gallery, Sydney and Light Black (2003-4) that travelled to Japan and Taiwan. Prism: Contemporary Australian Art (2006)featuring 74 works involved 35 artists and 20 lenders, both public and private, was developed in partnership with the Bridgestone Museum of Art for the Ishibashi Foundation, Japan, for tour to Tokyo.

Janice invited contemporary artists to work with the Flinders University Art Museum collection and to collaborate with a neuroscientist and anatomist for the exhibition Identity: Portraits and Places- document or insight? (2007). Six major SA artists were also commissioned to produce new works relating to art and science for Not Absolute (2009). As inaugural Manager, Art for Public Places (1990-97) and Senior Project Officer (1997-2000) at Arts SA she prepared policy and guidelines to support public art projects and new initiatives including the SALA Monograph. Her current position as Curator of Public Programs at the UWA Museums - including the Lawrence Wilson Art Gallery and Berndt Museum - enables her to work across disciplines, also collaborating with Campus Partners in the humanities and sciences. This brings together her interest in extending and communicating ideas through art and science. Janice served as a Board Member for four years for the Contemporary Art Centre of South Australia (2000-4) and is currently a member of the International Council of Museums, Museums Australia, Australian Experimental Art Foundation and Contemporary Art Centre of SA.

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