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Today's date is Sunday, October 25, 2020
Science for the Community
 November 2012
Monday 19
9:00 - EVENT - PICSE 2012 Teacher Professional Development Website | More Information
The 2050 Challenge: Science Solutions for a Hungry World “Co-developing solutions to create a new way of supplying quality food by 2050.” The program includes sessions on: Informative presentations and exciting hands on lab sessions from leading industry and university representatives, showcasing cutting edge science to feed a hungry world. Learn about new science innovations and leading research, make curriculum links and pass your new found knowledge and excitement with further protocols and resources to take back to the classroom to further inspire your young scientists. Many Free resources to take with you as well as the famous conference dinner at a silver service restaurant starting with sunset drinks and canapé’s followed by a 3 course menu of fabulous WA produce and wines. Cost - $160 RSVP - 1 November 2012
Tuesday 27
9:00 - COURSE - R Basics : An introduction to the statistical package R Website | More Information
This course will take you through the basics you need to do statistical analyses in R, a powerful freeware statistical package.

The course will cover basic statistics such as t-tests, regression and ANOVA as well as producing high quality graphics.

The course is hosted by the Centre for Applied Statistics and we offer discounted rate fees to UWA Graduate Research Students.

Fee information is available on our website https://www.cas.maths.uwa.edu.au/courses. Please register online.

18:30 - PUBLIC LECTURE - 'Defining good outcomes for autistic people: What are "we" striving for?' : Free public lecture by Dr Liz Pellicano on defining what is a "good" intervention or outcome for individuals with autism More Information
At present, there is little consensus between policymakers, scientists, and advocacy groups as to what defines a "good" intervention or a "good" outcome for individuals with autism.

Scientists often concentrate on narrowly-defined outcomes such as changes in IQ scores, autistic behavious or language skills. Others, such as those in public policy, focus instead on life adjustment and social inclusion: whether a person is in paid employment, has friends and social contact, and achieves independence. And parents and people with autism themselves may focus on states of subjective wellbeing such as happiness and quality of family life.

In this talk, Dr Pellicano will discuss some of the social and ethical implications of issues surrounding what is a good intervention or a desirable outcome for autistic people and further consider who should get to make these decisions.
Wednesday 28
8:00 - CONFERENCE - Society for Ecological Restoration Australasia Conference : An essential international forum for scientists and practitioners who look to restoration as a means to conserve the planet's dwindling biodiversity and failing ecosystems. Website | More Information
Society for Ecological Restoration Australasia (SERA) meetings aim to provide an essential international forum for scientists and practitioners who look to restoration as a means to conserve the planet's dwindling biodiversity and failing ecosystems. These meetings provide a critical platform to assist us in defining the principles of restoration, understanding goals and milestones, debating what ecosystem functions to measure and closing the gap between the science of restoration ecology and the practice of ecological restoration.

The inaugural conference of the Society for Ecological Restoration Australasia (SERA) will be held in Perth, Western Australia, on 28-30 November 2012. For land managers, scientists and practitioners who work in biodiversity restoration, this SERA meeting will provide a critical international forum at a time of significance for the region's species, ecosystems and landscapes.
Thursday 29
9:00 - COURSE - Design and Analysis of Experiments : A Statistics Short Course using R Website | More Information
The course is designed for people with knowledge of basic statistics who want to learn more about designing and analysing experiments.

It will cover material ranging from a review of simple one-way ANOVA, to more complex designs and analyses including crossed and nested factors with fixed and random effects.

The course is hosted by the Centre for Applied Statistics and we offer discounted rate fees to UWA Graduate Research Students.

Fee information is available on our website https://www.cas.maths.uwa.edu.au/courses. Please register online.
Friday 30
12:00 - EVENT - PICSE Industry Placement Scholarship: Winners notified More Information
Winners notified!

The ‘Industry Placement Scholarship’ program consists of a free five-day Residential Camp at UWA from the 3rd-7th December and five days of ‘Industry Placement’ in January, followed by the Reporting back Session on Friday evening the Friday 1st of February 2013.

This science scholarship connects tertiary-bound science students with primary industry scientists, university professionals and exciting career pathways. The Industry Placement forms a vital part of the PICSE scholarship program. It provides an opportunity for winning scholarship students to participate in the real world of research science in the primary industries.

The Industry Placement is organised to take place for one week in January, at a time that is convenient to the host organisation and the student. During this week, scholarship students work alongside research scientists to get a feel for what is happening at the cutting edge of science in the primary industries.

For more information, please contact Belinda Pope on 6488 1646.

 December 2012
Saturday 01
9:00 - EVENT - SPICE PD, Regional Visits and Travelling Scientist : The Travelling Scientist accompanies the SPICE team when they visit regional schools. The Travelling Scientist, a young PhD student, talks to students about their journey in science Website | More Information
SPICE Events are designed to expose high school science teachers to exciting new science by increasing interaction between teachers and researchers at UWA. They provide the opportunity for teachers to engage in current research and learn new ideas for the classroom, and usually contain a range of activities including hands-on lab sessions, field trips or presentations showcasing cutting-edge research. We expect the heightened engagement and interaction between teachers and tertiary scientists to have a significant impact upon the enthusiasm of teachers for science.

See website for dates and further details.
Tuesday 04
9:00 - COURSE - Introduction to Structural Equation Modelling : A Short Course using AMOS and Mplus Website | More Information
SEM is used widely by researchers to test complex relationships among observed (measured) and latent (unobserved) variables. This course will introduce you to SEM and also covers issues relating to model specification, identification and estimation, assessing model fit (goodness-of-fit criteria), and dealing with problem data.

The course is hosted by the Centre for Applied Statistics and we offer discounted rate fees to UWA Graduate Research Students.

Fee information is available on our website https://www.cas.maths.uwa.edu.au/courses. Please register online.

18:00 - PUBLIC LECTURE - Wade Davis public lecture Website | More Information
Presented by: The State Library of WA

Dr Wade Davis (Canada) is a best-selling author, intellectual, photographer, Explorer-in-Residence for the National Geographic as well as a noted two-time TED Talk speaker.

Described as “A rare combination of scientist, scholar, poet and passionate defender of all life’s diversity”, Wade Davis is perhaps the most the most articulate and influential western advocate for the world's indigenous cultures.

Through his work as a Harvard Anthropologist and Ethnobotanist he spent years living and working in the jungles of South America as a plant explorer. In more recent years he has travelled to and lived with Indigenous communities in some of the most remote places on the planet.

Against a backdrop of extraordinary stories that ignite the imagination, Wade Davis explains the importance of ancient wisdom in teaching us valuable lessons in how to protect the future of our earth.

The talk will be followed by a book signing. Books will be available for purchase.

The State Library of Western Australia would like to thank its major partners and sponsors: National Geographic Channel, ABC 720, Creative Innovations 2012 and UWA Publishing. TICKETS: $39 plus ticketing fee. Cost includes finger food and drinks. Tickets will be on sale via www.ticketek.com.au / 1300 795 012
Monday 10
9:00 - COURSE - Applied structural equation models : A Short Course using Mplus Website | More Information
The course is designed as a comprehensive coverage of applied SEM techniques using the Mplus statistical software package. Mplus offers a general modelling framework that allows both the modelling of cross-sectional and longitudinal data using observed variables that are a combination of continuous and categorical variables.

The course is hosted by the Centre for Applied Statistics and we offer discounted rate fees to UWA Graduate Research Students.

Fee information is available on our website https://www.cas.maths.uwa.edu.au/courses. Please register online.

 January 2013
Monday 14
9:00 - STUDENT EVENT - National Youth Science Forum : A two-week program for students moving into year 12 Website | More Information
The National Youth Science Forum is a two weeks in January program of events for students about to enter Year 12 and who are considering going on to a tertiary education in the sciences. The Forum is run in three sessions: two in Canberra and one in Perth.

Selection of participants for the Forum is coordinated by Rotary International and is undertaken by Rotarians, members of the scientific community including teachers, and former NYSF students. Selection is competitive, so the students that attend NYSF are some of the brightest young minds in the country.

The Forum aims to expose the students not only to the different career options in the sciences, but also to the choices of tertiary institutions they can attend to obtain the degree that enables them to embark on their new career.
Tuesday 15
9:00 - STUDENT EVENT - The Science Experience 2013 : A three-day program of science events for high school students Website | More Information
The UWA Science Experience is a three-day program of events held at The University of Western Australia campus for students about to enter Year 10 and Year 11. Around 160 students from schools across the metropolitan region and country Western Australia will attend.

The program is designed to excite students about science and technology and introduce the students to the variety of career options in science and engineering, with the aim that more will choose to study and pursue a career in science. It also aims to give the participants a unique UWA experience, providing them with an opportunity to find out what university life is like and to feel like a university student for three days.

 February 2013
Friday 01
9:00 - EVENT - SPICE PD, Regional Visits and Travelling Scientist : The Travelling Scientist accompanies the SPICE team when they visit regional schools. The Travelling Scientist, a young PhD student, talks to students about their journey in science Website | More Information
SPICE Events are designed to expose high school science teachers to exciting new science by increasing interaction between teachers and researchers at UWA. They provide the opportunity for teachers to engage in current research and learn new ideas for the classroom, and usually contain a range of activities including hands-on lab sessions, field trips or presentations showcasing cutting-edge research. We expect the heightened engagement and interaction between teachers and tertiary scientists to have a significant impact upon the enthusiasm of teachers for science.

See website for dates and further details.

9:00 - WORKSHOP - SPICE Learning Technology and Science Workshops : For High School science teachers Website | More Information
SPICE Events are designed to expose high school science teachers to exciting new science by increasing interaction between teachers and researchers at UWA. They provide the opportunity for teachers to engage in current research and learn new ideas for the classroom, and usually contain a range of activities including hands-on lab sessions, field trips or presentations showcasing cutting-edge research. We expect the heightened engagement and interaction between teachers and tertiary scientists to have a significant impact upon the enthusiasm of teachers for science.

See website for dates and further details.
Saturday 16
17:00 - FESTIVAL - Astrofest : An astronomical extravaganza More Information
'Astrofest' is an astronomical extravaganza, featuring a range of interesting and engaging activities for anyone and everyone to enjoy whether they're 'astro-nerds' or 'cosmic-newbies'.

Astrofest will start before the sun sets, with displays, information booths 'space domes' and activities. Then after the sun goes down Night sky observing will get underway. Plus science talks given by local astronomers, stalls and displays from local societies, groups, organisations and Universities and an Astrophotography exhibition.
Wednesday 20
10:00 - EVENT - UWA Turf Research Program Open Day : Managing turfgrass on a water allocation Website | More Information
You are invited to an informal Open Day at the UWA Turf Research Facility to see how different water allocations, in combination with wetting-agents, have influenced the development of dry-patch. A brief presentation will commence at 10:15am sharp. Please remember to wear sturdy footwear, as the site is very sandy. RSVP appreciated
Friday 22
15:00 - PUBLIC TALK - Shakespearean Ontogeny : Public talk with Dr. Richard Paul Hamilton Website | More Information
There is a popular view of biological development which goes something like this. Biological form is the cumulative result of internal genetic forces and external environmental ones. Like all models in biology this rather neat view had the advantage of allowing researchers to navigate a path through the bewildering complexity of organic life. But like all metaphors it comes at the price of bewitchment. As Wittgenstein writes in Philosophical Investigations 115: “a picture held us captive and we could not escape it because it lay in our language”. One consequence of this bewitchment is that explanatory privilege was given to the internal 'code' enshrined in the DNA, a view most famously (or notoriously) associated with Richard Dawkins' gene-centric account of evolution. This apparently resolved a number of outstanding puzzles in theoretical biology notably the transmission of stable form across generations.

In this context, the Human Genome Project can be seen as the most fruitful failure in scientific history. Such a claim may seem puzzling, since the Human Genome Project might be considered a success, not least in the numerous promising advances in medicine that it presaged. Nevertheless, the somewhat hyperbolic claim that it would finally unlock the secret code which would reveal what it means to be human have been largely unfulfilled and with good reason. There never was such a code.

The last two decades in the biological sciences can be characterised by the slogan: Taking Development Seriously. Whereas the neo-Darwinian mathematical modellers tended to treat the actual process of development as a black box, a sustained effort is now underway to explain the relationship between evolution (phylogeny) and organismic development (ontogeny). One thing has become clear: the simple dichotomous picture of gene and environment is inadequate, even as a simplifying device. DNA rarely exists in isolation and where it does it is inert. There is no reason to give DNA causal or explanatory privilege in developmental processes. Rather, development is a complex and contingent process in which the developing organism constructs itself and to some extent its developmental environment from the resources at hand. The organism makes its own history albeit not in circumstances of its choosing.

If the code metaphor is no longer adequate what can replace it? In this talk I will suggest a new and hopefully fruitful analogy which might capture some of the complexities involved. I will compare the process of biological development to the construction of a Shakespearean play. As Shakespeare scholars have long known there are no definitive Shakespeare texts and it seems likely that Shakespeare never actually sat down and wrote Hamlet or Much Ado About Nothing. Rather the plays were workshopped and Shakespeare provided prompt notes to the players. The texts with which we are familiar are re-constructions of performances which have been handed down corrected and interpreted through numerous generations. Most crucially every new performance of Shakespeare is an interpretation be it a group of Lesbian players doing in Hamlet in Soweto or an 'authentic Elizabethan dress' performance at the Globe in London. Moreover, every performance takes place in a rich and complex interpretative environment and the audience plays as much a role in the play's construction as the author or players.

Similarly, all the natural world is a stage, or so I shall argue.

Dr. Richard Paul Hamilton completed a PhD on love as a social phenomenon, under the supervision of Professors Susan James and Jennifer Hornsby at Birkbeck College, The University of London. He works on moral philosophy, the philosophy of the emotions, the philosophy of action and the philosophy of social sciences with particular interests in the legal definition of morally contested concepts. His most recent publications have dealt with evolutionary psychology and love as an essentially contested concept. He is currently engaged in a project investigating the biological bases of moral conduct. Before arriving at Notre Dame, he taught at the University of Manchester, the University of Leeds and Manchester Metropolitan University.
Thursday 28
14:00 - Closing date - The Australian Brain Bee - neuroscience competition for high school students : Closing date for Round 1 registrations Website | More Information
The Australian Brain Bee Challenge (ABBC) motivates young people to learn about the brain – and has been created to inspire students to pursue careers in neuroscience research.

As Australia’s only neuroscience competition for high school students, the ABBC is an event that will have you expanding your hemispheres!

The Brain Bee Challenge is a test of knowledge about important facts concerning intelligence, memory, emotions, sensations, movement, stress, aging, sleep, Alzheimer’s disease and stroke.

 March 2013
Friday 01
9:00 - WORKSHOP - SPICE Learning Technology and Science Workshops : For high school science teachers Website | More Information
SPICE Events are designed to expose high school science teachers to exciting new science by increasing interaction between teachers and researchers at UWA. They provide the opportunity for teachers to engage in current research and learn new ideas for the classroom, and usually contain a range of activities including hands-on lab sessions, field trips or presentations showcasing cutting-edge research. We expect the heightened engagement and interaction between teachers and tertiary scientists to have a significant impact upon the enthusiasm of teachers for science.

See website for dates and further details.

9:00 - STUDENT EVENT - UWA Campus Challenge : Opening date for applications for current year 10-12 students Website | More Information
A event run in the July school holidays for prospective UWA students. Dates and program yet to be confirmed.

Campus Challenge aims to provide high school students with the opportunity to experience different aspects of university life through participation in academic, sporting, recreational and social activities on campus at The University of Western Australia.

The main objective of the camp is to enable students to make vital decisions about their future tertiary education by exposing them to all aspects of university life.

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