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Today's date is Friday, October 23, 2020
School of Molecular Sciences Seminars
 March 2019
Thursday 28
10:00 - SEMINAR - Bayliss Seminar Series : Adventures in Total Synthesis from the Gracilioethers to Serrulatane Natural Products More Information

12:00 - SEMINAR - [email protected] : Skeletal genetics and transcriptomics More Information

13:00 - SEMINAR - The Search for a function of the melanoma tumour antigen melanotransferrin: Iron binding molecule turned pro-tumourigenic signalling protein : School of Human Sciences Seminar Series Website | More Information
Melanotransferrin (MTf) is a membrane-bound transferrin homologue that is found in melanoma cells and was one of the first melanoma tumour antigens to be characterized. It possesses an iron-binding site like the iron-binding protein in the blood, transferrin, but does not play a role in normal cellular iron metabolism. This was shown by Richardson through a variety of studies in vitro in cell culture and in vivo using purpose generated melanotransferrin knockout and transgenic mice. However, Richardson later demonstrated that melanotransferrin stimulates melanoma growth, proliferation and migration and more recently appears to play an exciting role in oncogenic signalling via down-regulating the metastasis suppressor protein, NDRG1. Intriguingly, over-expression of NDRG1 can down-regulate MTf. The studies over a period of 20 years will be discussed.

 April 2019
Friday 05
12:00 - SEMINAR - [email protected] : Targeting P-glyoprotein, endocytosis and the lysosome compartment as a novel anti-cancer stragegy of overcome cancer cell resistance More Information
Thursday 11
12:00 - SEMINAR - Seminar Series : Analysis of Imaging Mass Spectrometry Data in Proteomics and Cancer Research More Information
Friday 12
12:00 - EVENT - Bayliss Seminar Series : Towards machine learning in computational spectroscopy for isomers More Information
Towards machine learning in computational spectroscopy for isomers
Tuesday 23
12:00 - SEMINAR - Bayliss Seminar Series : Markus Muellner - Tailor-made nanoparticles from molecular polymer brushes More Information
Friday 26
13:00 - SEMINAR - Phenotypic consequences of mutation accumulations on mitochondria : School of Human Sciences Seminar Series Website | More Information
Abstract: Professor Dufresne France - Phenotypic consequences of mutation accumulations on mitochondria. Mitochondria are essential organelles that generate ATP necessary to sustain life via the oxidative phosphorylation. The mitochondrial genome is known to be sensitive to the accumulation of deleterious mutations due to its highly mutagenic environment. Yet we lack a complete understanding of the impact of spontaneous DNA mutations on heritable damages within the germ line and how these affect mitochondrial functions. Exposure to mutagenic environmental contaminants can accelerate mutation accumulation. However, little is known about how mutagenic compounds affect the scope and extent of the phenotypic effects of spontaneous mutations on the mitochondria. In this talk, I will present our recent work on the effects of mutation accumulations (MA) on mitochondrial traits and fitness in the microinvertebrate, Daphnia pulex. We used lines of Daphnia that were bottlenecked every generation for 120 generations under mild copper and benign conditions. We compared life history traits, mtDNA copy number and mitochondrial respiration in bottlenecked Daphnia lines to those of control lines (Daphnia that were kept in large numbers for the same period of time). Our results are the first to empirically demonstrate the alleged sensitivity of mitochondria to mutational load and point at modulation of mtDNA content as an important mitigation mechanism of mutational impacts.

Bio: France Dufresne is a professor of genetics at the Université du Québec à Rimouski. She obtained her Ph.D. in zoology from the university of Guelph. She held postdoctorate fellowships at the Université Laval and at the Scripps Institute of Oceanography (San Diego). She has major interests in genome size evolution, and more specifically in how increases in genome size through polyploidy affects adaptation to cold environments. Another major aspect of her studies is the evolution of sexual reproduction. She applies genetic and genomic tools to examine the evolutionary consequences of a lack of genetic recombination in her model system, Daphnia. Other areas of expertise in her laboratory include genetic connectivity and local adaptation in various marine invertebrate species and algae.

 May 2019
Tuesday 21
18:00 - EVENT - HMS Postgraduate Course Information Evening Website | More Information
Are you interested in a career in Medicine, Dentistry, Podiatric Medicine or Pharmacy?

Bachelor’s degree holders or students who are in their first bachelor’s degree may be eligible to apply for graduate entry into one of the Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences postgraduate professional degrees.

Come along to this course information evening for more information on how to:

- Explore postgraduate options in health and medicine

- Understand admission requirements and application processes

- Find out key dates and timelines

- Hear from current postgraduate students about their experience studying at UWA

- Have your questions answered one to one by current postgraduate students and academics at the conclusion of the presentation
Friday 24
12:00 - SEMINAR - Seminar Series : Theoretical and computational molecular science: from nonequilibrium systems to materials for sustainable energy applications More Information
Theoretical and computational molecular science: from nonequilibrium systems to materials for sustainable energy applications

Tuesday 28
13:00 - SEMINAR - How Regenerative Biology is Used to Sell the Dream of Lab Grown Consumer Products : School of Human Sciences Seminar Series Website | More Information
Abstract: The Tissue Culture & Art Project (Oron Catts and Ionat Zurr) are credited as the first to grow (2000) and eat (2003) lab grown meat as well as the first to grow tissue engineered leather (2004). These where critical art projects that were set to highlight the radical shifts in our understanding of, and relationships with the concept of life. More than ten years later cellular agriculture and biofabrication are hailed as solutions to a many environmental issues. The biological laboratory is imagined as the new farm, where animal and/or agricultural products a grown using regenerative biology and other bio-techniques. This talk would present the concepts behind the developments of cellular agriculture and biofabrication and would attempt to situate their existence within a timeline and scale of global scientific, technological, economic and cultural narratives and endeavours. It will start with the original Tissue Culture & Art Projects, follow the trajectory of the fields of cellular agriculture and biofabrication, and present some of the recent works from SymbioticA that are in dialogue with these recent developments, including a series of off grid incubators powered by compost.
Friday 31
12:00 - SEMINAR - Bayliss Seminar Series : Andrew Marshall: The reducer, the acetylator and the DNA replicator - Structural studies on essential Aspergillus fumigatus proteins. More Information

12:00 - SEMINAR - Bayliss Seminar Series : Andrew Marshall – UWA Bond Lab More Information

 June 2019
Wednesday 05
11:00 - SEMINAR - Bayliss Seminar Series : Professor Luigi Cavallo - Tuning Vicinal and Remote Steric Effects in the Rationalization of Catalytic Behavior More Information

13:00 - SEMINAR - Postgraduate Showcase: Frontiers in Agriculture Website | More Information
Each year The UWA Institute of Agriculture hosts a postgraduate showcase where some of UWA's top PhD students present their research in agriculture and related areas. Join us for an afternoon of fantastic talks from seven PhD students in the UWA School of Agriculture and Environment, the UWA School of Molecular Sciences, and the UWA Law School, with an introduction by Prof Imelda Whelehan, Dean, Graduate Research School. Afternoon tea and refreshments provided.
Friday 07
12:00 - SEMINAR - Bayliss Seminar : Professor Norbert Jux – Carbon-rich porphyrins More Information
Thursday 13
12:00 - SEMINAR - Bayliss Seminar Series : Grishma Vadlamani - Understanding the structure and function of proteins involved in inducible AmpC β-lactamase resistance More Information
The inducible expression of AmpC β-lactamase is a major cause of β-lactam antibiotic resistance in several clinically relevant Gram-negative bacteria, including the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. AmpC induction is regulated by the transcriptional regulator AmpR, which binds to the divergent ampR-ampC operon and is activated by 1,6-anhydromuramoylpeptide – an anabolite of peptidoglycan (PG) recycling that is generated by the N-acetyl-β-glucosaminidase NagZ. I will be sharing my findings into the molecular basis of ampC induction based on the structural and biophysical characterization of the archetypal AmpR protein from Citrobacter freundii (CfAmpR). CfAmpR forms a homotetramer that is stabilized by binding the intergenic region of the ampR-ampC operon, and it interacts with up to four repressor ligands (UDP-MurNAc-pentapeptide) in an apparent stepwise manner. Since NagZ generates the AmpR activator ligand, blocking its activity enhances β-lactam efficacy against bacteria with inducible AmpC systems. Crystal structures of NagZ from Burkholderia cenocepacia were determined in complex with the glycosidase inhibitor O-(2-acetamido-2- deoxy-D-glucopyranosylidene)-amino-N-phenylcarbamate (PUGNAc) and its NagZ-selective derivative ethylbutyryl-PUGNAc, 3-acetamido-4,5,6-trihydroxyazepane (MM-124) and its NagZ-selective derivative MM-156, showing that plasticity within the NagZ active site could be exploited to improve the design of inhibitors that selectively bind NagZ over functionally related human N-acetyl-β-glucosaminidases. Furthering an understanding of the role of NagZ inhibition on β-lactam resistance in P. aeruginosa, it was found that the NagZ inhibitor PUGNAc could prevent the emergence of high-level AmpC-mediated β-lactam resistance, and significantly enhanced β-lactam susceptibility in synergy with the potent β-lactamase inhibitor avibactam in an ampC derepressed P. aeruginosa strain. Collectively, this talk offers key insights into the regulatory mechanism of AmpC β-lactamase expression and explores small molecule based strategies to potentiate β-lactam efficacy against Gram-negative bacterial pathogens.
Wednesday 19
12:00 - SEMINAR - Bayliss Seminar : Professor Rita Bernhardt – Uni of Saarlandes, Germany More Information

 July 2019
Wednesday 03
13:00 - SEMINAR - Deconstructing, replicating and engineering instructive niches for stem cell differentiation : School of Human Sciences Seminar Series More Information
Abstract: Most cells in our bodies are embedded in a complex matrix of extracellular molecules. These tissue-specific and dynamic microenvironments are essential for the functioning of the cells. But exactly what these microenvironments, or so-called "cell niche", are doing to the cells? Can we capture the "design principles" of these complex matrices on engineered microsystems, and guide in vitro cultured cells to form and function as a tissue? Traditional two-dimensional cell culture systems have been used to investigate the roles of tissue microenviroments. But these experimental systems are often too simplistic to reflect the complexity of the natural microenvironment. On the other hand, native tissue microenvironments, such as those provided by decellularised organs, are too complex to be reverse-engineered into model systems that can be studied and applied. This talk summarises our lab's recent attempts to deconstruct tissue microenvironments into their biochemical and architectural components, and investigate the roles of each components in guiding adult stem cell differentiation. The objective of this seminar is to introduce an interdisciplinary audience to the nature and challenges of our research question, and to present some of the approaches we are using to tackle it. Discussion with the cell biologists, bioengineers, materials scientists after the talk will hopefully bring forth fresh and creative ideas on this project.

17:45 - Information session - MBA and Graduate Certificate Information Evening : Find out about UWA MBA and Graduate Certificate courses on offer. Website | More Information
Are you ready to transform your career?

Join us at the next MBA and Graduate Certificate information evening.

Discover your study options and entry pathways into the UWA MBA, plus find out about the program's networking opportunities, access to industry professionals, personalised career mentorship and international study tours.

Meet our MBA Director, Allan Trench, as well as students currently in the program, alumni who've completed their course, and your future lecturers in the UWA Business School, to gain an insight of what life as an MBA candidate is really like.

5:45pm: Registrations open; 6:00pm: Presentations by current students, alumni and MBA Directors; 7:00pm: Networking, drinks and opportunity for your questions to be answered.

Registrations essential online: https://study.uwa.edu.au/events/mba-information-evening-3-july

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