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Today's date is Thursday, November 26, 2020
Physics Seminars
 June 2018
Friday 22
15:30 - SEMINAR - Gravitational Wave and testing of gravity More Information
Gravitational waves (GWs) provide the excellent opportunity to test General Relativity in strong fields. In this talk, by comparing General Relativity and its alternative, the general screened modified gravity, we introduce the testing of gravity in solar system with PPN framework, in binary pulsars with PPK framework, and in GW bursts. In the last case, we introduce the model-dependent (waveforms of GWs in various alternative theories of gravity) and model-independent comparisons (by PPE framework, GW polarization, GW speed, time-dependence of G, parity symmetry etc.).

 July 2018
Friday 13
11:00 - UWA Research Event - Research Impact Series : Discover how our world-leading researchers are tackling global, national and regional issues to make the world a better place. Website | More Information
Research Impact Series Events:

Cosmos: Journey Through the Universe Thursday. 9 August, 18 October and 8 November 2018

Germaine Greer On Rape: Monday 3 September 2018

Raising the Bar Perth: 10 bars, 10 topics, 1 night only. Tuesday 11 September 2018

Achieving your Research Outcomes: Wednesday 17 - Thursday 18 October 2018

 August 2018
Monday 06
10:00 - SEMINAR - CMCA Seminar Series : Advanced EELS and camera technology for research in physics, chemistry and life sciences More Information
Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is arguably the most powerful technique for the characterisation of materials structures at the micro-, nano- and sub-nanometer scales. Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy (EELS)is a TEM technique for composition and chemical environment or chemical bonding analysis. Image recording is critical for TEM study of materials. This presentation will focus on the newest development in the data acquisition and analysis of EELS and in camera technology. The new EELS technique enables the chemical bonding and electronic structural analysis for both light and heavy elements with very high energy resolution. The new TEM camera with ultra-high speed and detective quantum efficiency allows imaging beam-sensitive biomaterials and chemical materials with extremely low electron beam dose, which provides and effective solution to minimise structural degradation of the biomaterials and chemical materials during the TEM study process. Combination of state-of-art camera and EELS techniques offers an extremely powerful tool for the investigation of biomaterials and catalytic processes in nanoscale as well as the accurate quantitative elemental information.
Thursday 16
16:00 - SEMINAR - Mathematics and Statistics colloquium : Bounding the number of symmetries of a graph More Information
Graphs (also called networks) with a high degree of symmetry are particularly nice objects to study mathematically. When studying the symmetries of a graph it is often useful to look at the local symmetries, that is, those that fix a particular vertex.  An important question then becomes whether or not we can bound the number of these local symmetries. After a gentle introduction to the area, I will outline some of the results in this direction and their consequences.
Wednesday 22
18:00 - PUBLIC LECTURE - Sir Wallace Kyle Oration 2018 Website | More Information
The McCusker Centre for Citizenship at UWA, in partnership with the Rotary Club of Perth, invite you to the 2018 Sir Wallace Kyle Oration.

The late Air Chief Marshall, Sir Wallace Kyle, was an Honorary Doctor of Laws at The University of Western Australia and Governor of Western Australia from 1975-1980.

The Sir Wallace Kyle Oration is given by distinguished speakers of international standing and outstanding leadership. The theme of the Oration is "Service Above Self", the motto of Rotary.

Professor Stanley's oration will highlight the leadership and contribution individual citizens can make to build a more equal and just world, with reference to her distinguished career.

This is a free public event but registration is required.
Thursday 30
16:00 - SEMINAR - Mathematics and Statistics colloquium : From the fractional Laplacian to the nonlocal minimal surfaces More Information
The fractional Laplacian is a nonlocal operator naturally arising in several branches of pure and applied mathematics. It presents intriguing features and possesses a great flexibility to a number of applications in physics, biology, numerics and finance. After briefly discussing the basics of this operator and some concrete applications, we will consider in some detail the case of nonlocal minimal surfaces.  In particular, the regularity of these objects seems to be a rather challenging topic. Nonlocal minimal surfaces also exhibit stickiness phenomena that are special for the nonlocal setting and have no classical counterpart.

 September 2018
Monday 10
13:00 - EVENT - Mathematica 11, what's new? : A demonstration of the capabilities of the latest version of Mathematica. More Information
For 30 years, Wolfram Research has been serving Educators and Researchers. In the past 10 years, we have introduced many award winning technology innovations like Wolfram|Alpha Pro, Wolfram SystemModeler, Wolfram Programming Lab, and Natural Language computation. Join Craig Bauling as he guides us through the capabilities of Mathematica. Craig will demonstrate the key features that are directly applicable for use in teaching and research. Topics of this technical talk include : * Natural Language Input ( http : // www.wolfram.com/broadcast/screencasts/free - form - input/ ) * Market Leading Statistical Analysis Functionality * Mathematica as a Symbolic and Numeric Computational Engine * Creating interactive models that encourage student participation and learning * Practical applications in Engineering, Chemistry, Physics, Finance, Biology, Economics and Mathematics * On - demand Chemical, Biological, Economic, Finance and Social data * Mathematica as a modern programming language

Prior knowledge of Mathematica is not required - new users are encouraged. Current users will benefit from seeing the many improvements and new features of Mathematica 11 (https://www.wolfram.com/mathematica/new-in-11/). This is a great opportunity to get faculty and students not experienced with Mathematica to become involved and excited.

 October 2018
Thursday 11
16:00 - SEMINAR - Mathematics and Statistics colloquium : Interface dynamics: new mechanisms of stabilization and destabilization and structure of flow fields More Information
Interfacial mixing and transport are non-equilibrium processes coupling kinetic to macroscopic scales. They occur in fluids, plasmas and materials, over celestial events to atoms. Grasping their fundamentals can advance a broad range of disciplines in science, mathematics, and engineering. This work focuses on the long- standing classical problem of stability of a phase boundary - a fluid interface that has a mass flow across it. We briefly review the recent advances and challenges in theoretical and experimental studies, present our general theoretical framework directly linking microscopic interfacial transport to macroscopic flow fields, for both inertial and accelerated dynamics, discover new mechanisms of the interface stabilization and destabilization, and chart perspectives for future research.
Tuesday 30
13:00 - SEMINAR - Lover or fighter: you can’t have it all : School of Human Sciences Seminar Series More Information
Bio: Leigh received his PhD from Nottingham University in 1986 and held a series of postdoctoral fellowships at the University of Liverpool until 1995 when he moved to UWA. He was awarded an ARC Federation Fellowship in 2004 and was elected to the Australian Academy in 2009. He is currently Editor-in-Chief of the journal Behavioral Ecology, Editor of Advances in the Study of Behavior, and on the editorial board of Journal of Ethology.

Overview: Broadly my research focuses on the evolutionary process of sexual selection, and its effects on the evolution of animal form and function. Evolutionary theory is based on the fundamental assumption that organisms are constrained by a trade-off that limits the allocation of resources to different fitness enhancing traits. I will first give a general introduction to sexual selection, before briefly outline some theoretical models used to predict the evolution of male sexual traits in the face of allocation trade-offs. I will then provide some empirical studies that have sought to test these predictions.

 November 2018
Thursday 01
16:00 - SEMINAR - Mathematics and Statistics colloquium : Generalisations and variations of the Monty Hall Problem More Information
The Monty Hall problem is a probability puzzle based on an American television game show. Some generalisations of the original problem are considered here: - The probability distribution is generalised from equal likelihood to an arbitrary known prior distribution, with the number of doors changed to a general n. - Optimal decision rule among a class of randomised strategies is derived. - The behaviour of the host and its consequences are taken into account. - Variations and further generalisations are considered.
Thursday 15
8:45 - CONFERENCE - 2018 Australian Institute of Physics WA Postgraduate Conference Website | More Information
This year's Australian Institute of Physics WA Postgraduate Student Conference will be held at the University of Western Australia on Thursday the 15th of November.

This event is open to all WA students researching in physics or physics-related subjects and is the perfect opportunity for them to meet their peers from across the state and present their research in a friendly environment.

Register by 25th October 2018.
Thursday 22
16:00 - SEMINAR - Mathematics and Statistics colloquium : Nonlocal equations, atom dislocation dynamics in crystals, and chaotic orbits More Information
In this talk, we introduce some basics of nonlocal equations, with some applications in mind coming from physics and material sciences. In particular, the equation taken into account comes from a model, developed by Rudolf Peierls and Frank Nabarro, that describes the edge dislocation of atoms in an ideal crystal. Moreover, we present the construction of multibump, heteroclinic, homoclinic and chaotic trajectories, providing a symbolic dynamics in this framework.

 December 2018
Monday 03
8:00 - SYMPOSIUM - AMSI BioInfoSummer Symposium Website | More Information
Held over 5 days, AMSI BioInfoSummer is a key training event in Australia, that allows attendees to develop their bioinformatics skills, national networks and employability, and nurtures the collaborations between the mathematics, statistics and information technology disciplines. AMSI BioInfoSummer brings together Australian and international researchers from the mathematical, statistical and biological sciences to develop further applications of mathematics and statistics to bioinformatics and introduce students and early career researchers to state-of-the-art bioinformatics research. AMSI BioInfoSummer is funded jointly by the Department of Education and Traning and the Australian Mathematical Sciences Institute (AMSI). In 2018, AMSI BioInfoSummer will be hosted by the University of Western Australia in partnership with Murdoch University and Edith Cowan University.

This is the first time AMSI BioInfoSummer will be held in WA so we would appreciate your support in promoting this event. We are expecting 150 -200 attendees to the 2018 symposium.

10:00 - PUBLIC TALK - Advanced analytical work and skills needed in the corporate space : What does a corporate financial analyst do? More Information
This talk will look at some examples of advanced analytical work in the corporate space and the challenges operating in that environment can pose to a former academic. We’ll then look at some of the skills I believe are key to being successful as a data scientist in a commercial environment.

 February 2019
Thursday 21
16:00 - SEMINAR - Mathematics and Statistics colloquium : Particle modelling applied to industrial and biophysical problems More Information
Particle methods have capabilities that particularly suit numerical simulation of complex phenomena involved in industrial and biophysical application domains. The two core methods used in this talk are DEM (Discrete Element Method) and SPH (Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics). Coupling of these methods also provides powerful capabilities to model multiphase behaviour. Industrial application to crushing and grinding, mixing and water cooling will be presented. Coupling to biomechanical models allows simulation of humans interacting with their environment. Examples of elite swimming, diving, kayaking and skiing will be shown. The use of these methods to simulate digestion (from breakdown in the mouth through stomach) and intestines will also be discussed.

 April 2019
Wednesday 10
12:30 - PRESENTATION - Physics to fish with some whales on the side! Second International Indian Ocean Expedition 110°E repeat line : Prof. Lynnath Beckley presents on the month-long voyage that will repeat the 1960s Indian Ocean investigation. Website | More Information
In the 1960s, Australia made a significant contribution to the first International Indian Ocean Expedition. Now, nearly six decades later, a second Expedition is underway, and in May 2019 a multi-institutional team of 30 oceanographers will head offshore from Fremantle with the Australian Research Vessel Investigator to study the oceanography of the SE Indian Ocean. On this month-long voyage we will to repeat the 110°E line from the 1960s, examine multi-decadal change in the physics, chemistry and biology of the water column, investigate microbes and biogeochemistry especially related to nitrogen and study the pelagic food web from plankton through to mesopelagic lantern fishes. The voyage will also enable ground truthing of bio-optical quantities like sea surface colour recorded by satellites as well as an acoustic survey of whales. For comparison, some of our work will use the original techniques employed during the first Expedition but these will be supplemented by a host of modern techniques and electronic technology that will assist us in better understanding the pelagic ecosystem at the western edge of Australia’s Exclusive Economic Zone.

 August 2019
Thursday 22
16:00 - SEMINAR - Mathematics and Statistics colloquium : Convex surfaces of constant Gauss curvature and partially free boundaries More Information
Consider a pair of parallel planes in and a strictly convex closed curve laying on one of the planes. Is there a convex hypersurface of constant Gauss curvature such that it is trapped between the planes, the curve is on its boundary, and the surface strikes the other plane at given constant angle? This problem can be viewed as a generalisation of the Alt-Caffarelli problem for the Gauss curvature case. In this talk we will discuss the existence of weak solutions and the regularity of the free boundary, which is the unknown part of the boundary of surface.

 September 2019
Friday 06
14:00 - SEMINAR - The Action Principle: From Virgil's Aeneid to Quantum Walks : Variational principles in physics break new ground More Information
Variational principles have proven to be surprisingly fertile in physics. The principle of stationary action originally arising out of a derivation of optics and mechanics, remains central in modern physics being applied to fluid mechanics, the theory of relativity, quantum mechanics, and even string theory. In this talk we take a walkthrough of the various extensions of the principle encompassing many fields of physics before arriving at a new extension into the realm of discrete time quantum walks that in their continuous limit match the Dirac equation from quantum field theory.

16:00 - SEMINAR - Groups and Combinatorics Seminar: Stephen Glasby, 4pm Sep 06 in Weatherburn LT More Information
Speaker: Stephen Glasby (University of Western Australia)

Title: Evaluating and estimating sums

Time and place: 4pm Friday 06 Sep 2019, Weatherburn LT

Abstract: In this expository talk I will show how "finite calculus" and hypergeometric identities can be used to evaluate certain sums. Surprisingly, these techniques can be used to estimate sums over primes.
Thursday 19
16:00 - SEMINAR - Mathematics and Statistics colloquium : Mathematics and Suicide More Information
The Young Lives Matter Foundation (https://www.uwa.edu.au/institutes/young-lives-matter/home)  aims to leverage research expertise across UWA to address the leading cause of death among 15- to 24-year olds in Western Australia. The foundation will address this aim by developing improved predictors of risk of self-harm and by better understanding the ways in which individuals interact with a myriad of health services. A deliberate and explicit focus of YLM is to tackle these goals through doing research differently. A key component of this is through new approaches in mathematics. I will provide an overview of some of the pilot work we have conducted over the last 18 months. Through direct observational study at Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital we have developed complex systems models of information transmission and patient flow within the health system. This has allowed us to evaluate system performance and identify key bottlenecks in the delivery of health services. A separate, data-driven, pilot study at Perth Clinic has developed machine learning algorithms which out-perform admission-based psychiatric evaluation for risk of self-harm.  This is joint work with Michael McCullough, Sean Hood, Andrew Page, David Lawrence, Binu Jayawardena, and Geoff Hooke.

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