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Today's date is Wednesday, November 25, 2020
Institute of Advanced Studies
 February 2020
Tuesday 18
18:00 - PUBLIC TALK - Lethal Intersections: women, race and violence Website | More Information
A public lecture by Patricia Hill Collins, Distinguished University Professor Emerita, Department of Sociology, University of Maryland.

In this lecture, internationally renowned sociologist Patricia Hill Collins will consider the concept and practices of intersectionality, a term that refers to the ways that systems of race, social class, gender, sexuality ethnicity, nation and age, intersect to compose systems of privilege and oppression. With particular reference to the intersections between race and gender, Patricia Hill Collins will explore the themes of Black Feminism and Intersectionality and will consider shared histories and contemporary justice claims of black women in the United States and Indigenous women of Australia.

This lecture coincides with the release of ‘Indigenous Femicide and the Killing State’, a case study undertaken by Deathscapes: Mapping Race and Violence in Setter States (Curtin University).

Professor Collins is a social theorist whose research and scholarship have examined issues of race, gender, social class, sexuality and/or nation. Her first book, 'Black Feminist Thought: Knowledge, Consciousness, and the Politics of Empowerment'(Routledge), published in 1990, with a revised tenth year anniversary edition published in 2000, won the Jessie Bernard Award of the American Sociological Association (ASA) for significant scholarship in gender, and the C. Wright Mills Award of the Society for the Study of Social Problems.

This public lecture is presented by the UWA Institute of Advanced Studies and Curtin University.

 March 2020
Wednesday 04
18:00 - PUBLIC TALK - Trends and dangers in US philanthropy — are there implications for Australia? Website | More Information
A public lecture by Mark Sidel, Doyle-Bascom Professor of Law and Public Affairs, University of Wisconsin-Madison.

In this lecture, Mark Sidel will discuss some important recent themes in US philanthropy – the role of philanthropy in an era of increasing wealth disparities; adaptations by US foundations to changing circumstances; the changing situations for community foundations; the increasing, and increasingly problematic role of philanthropy by the individually wealthy; the regulation/self-regulation dilemma in the US and elsewhere; the changing nature of philanthropy across borders; and other issues. He will also at least ask to what degree these issues may be present or playing out differently in some other jurisdictions.

Mark Sidel is Doyle-Bascom Professor of Law and Public Affairs at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and consultant for Asia at the Washington DC-based International Center for Not-for-Profit Law. He works on state-society relations, and particularly the regulation and self-regulation of philanthropy and the nonprofit sector, in Asia and the United States. Sidel is currently writing a book for the Brookings Institution on China’s relationships with the international nonprofit and foundation community under Xi Jinping, and doing research for a future volume on modern secessionary movements in the US and in comparative perspective.

18:00 - PUBLIC TALK - Reframing Human Rights: health, ‘dirt’ and ecologies of right-making Website | More Information
A public lecture by Professor Rosemary J. Jolly, Weiss Chair, Humanities in Literature and Human Rights, Pennsylvania State University and 2020 UWA Institute of Advanced Studies Visiting Fellow.

A central problem of the UNHR is its dependence on the state and citizenship as the conditions under which human rights flourish. Professor Jolly proposes an extra-anthropocentric contextualization of normative human rights as human rightness.

How do communities that do not depend on the state for their articulation – the indigenous, migrant, those at the peripheries of the global economy, and/or indentured by it – envision what she calls extra-anthropocentric human rightness, and how do they practice such rightness in aesthetic production, specifically as manifest in the narrative arts? Further, since human rights norms are deeply immersed in cultures of materialist accumulation, she is specifically interested in how animist cultures, who have beliefs in the value of the non-human and immaterial, have developed practices of human rightness through aesthetics means.

This talk uses narratives, both fictional and non-fictional, to pose an alternative to human rights frameworks that is non-anthropocentric (but not anti-human) to reframe debates concerning the health of humans, of the environment, and of the relation between the two. Professor Jolly will theorize how to frame the concept of Human Rights as non-anthropocentric and then go on to talk about her HIV/AIDS research to communicate a sense of what such an outlook might look like in the sub-Saharan African setting, in a specific context of massive human death.

It is her hope that this talk may open a discussion of what extra-anthropocentric human rightness may have to offer in the current Australian context of massive non-human animal extinction in the fires.

Rose Jolly was born in South Africa and left for Canada in 1981 due to the apartheid regime of the time. She came to Penn State in 2013. Her overarching interest is in the ways in which representations of violence and reconciliation actually affect inter-governmental, inter-community and inter-personal relations in contexts of conflict. Her work explores the links between living conditions of extreme deprivation, gender-based violence and coercion, and the HIV pandemic. She has worked with victim-survivors of state sponsored torture, gender-based violence, and communities fractured by illness globally. She explores the ethics of working with highly vulnerable communities in research and development.
Thursday 05
18:00 - PUBLIC TALK - Legal Humanism and the Automation of Everyday Life Website | More Information
A public lecture by Christophe Lazaro, Associate Professor of Law & Society, Centre for Philosophy of Law, University of Louvain and 2020 UWA Institute of Advanced Studies Visiting Fellow.

An entirely new fauna composed of entities, which are said to be smart and autonomous, progressively colonizes our everyday life (prosthetics, watches, clothes, tablets, vehicles, smart homes, etc). The emergence of these objects might cause a profound anthropological shift by radically transforming the nature of our environment in a fully automated technosphere.

This public lecture aims at analysing the legal consequences of the current process of automation of everyday life on legal humanism. Specifically, Professor Lazaro will explore three major tensions, which radically challenge legal humanism, by altering its fundamental fictional figures: the person, the subject, and the individual. By examining the tensions between (i) human and artefact (person), (ii) autonomy and paternalism (subject), and (iii) equality and singularity (individual), he will identify, beyond binary oppositions, a set of parameters, which could guide the legal and ethical understanding of these new “uncanny” entities.

Christophe Lazaro, Associate Professor of Law & Society at the Centre for Philosophy of Law of UCL, is an expert in interdisciplinary research on the legal and social impacts of new technologies on human agency and subjectivity (prosthetics, robotics, artificial intelligence).
Monday 09
18:00 - PUBLIC TALK - When Animals Talk Back. Perspectives on human-animal communication. Website | More Information
A public lecture by Don Kulick, Distinguished University Professor of Anthropology, Uppsala University, Sweden and 2020 UWA Institute of Advanced Studies Visiting Fellow.

The past two decades have seen a seismic shift in our understanding of what animals are, what they perceive and think, and what they are capable of. Biologists and ethologists who study animal behaviour have made vital contributions to this shift. However, a significant quantity of writing about animals comes from philosophers, humanities and social science scholars, as well as those working in professional sectors, including freelance animal trainers and behaviourists. What is behind this outpouring of interest in animals? And now that animals seem to have our collective ear, what exactly are they saying?

Don Kulick is Distinguished University Professor of Anthropology at Uppsala University, Sweden, where he directs the Engaging Vulnerability research program. He has published widely on sociolinguistics, gender and sexuality studies, disability studies, queer theory and animal studies. His most recent books are 'A Grammar and Dictionary of Tayap: the life and death of a Papuan language' (with Angela Terrill, Mouton de Gruyter), and 'A Death in the Rainforest: how a language and a way of life came to an end in Papua New Guinea' (Algonquin Books), both from last year.
Wednesday 11
18:00 - PUBLIC TALK - Interrogating an Ancient War on Terror: the persecution of the Christians reconsidered Website | More Information
A public lecture by Dr James Corke-Webster, Senior Lecturer, Roman History, King’s College London and 2020 UWA Institute of Advanced Studies Visiting Fellow.

This lecture will explore the persecution of the early Christians under the Roman Empire. This has always been remembered as a clash of ideologies – a war between the Roman state and its traditional gods on the one hand, and the new Christian cult and its upstart God on the other. But does our evidence really support that view? And if not, what might persecution look like?

This lecture looks to uncover not just how persecution was actually experienced in antiquity, but how it was (mis)remembered as well.

Dr James Corke-Webster is a Roman historian with particular interests in early Christian and late antique history and literature. He studied Classics and Theology at Oxford, Cambridge, and Manchester, before taking up a Fulbright Scholarship at Berkeley. He then held lectureships at Edinburgh and Durham before moving to Kings College in 2017. He is the author of 'Eusebius and Empire: Constructing Church and Rome in the Ecclesiastical History' (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2019).
Monday 16
16:00 - CANCELLED - MASTERCLASS - UWA Conservatorium of Music presents David Kim Masterclass (Piano) More Information
Unfortunately this event has been cancelled.

In light of the recent developments around international visitors arriving in Australia, we have taken the sad decision to cancel David Kim’s activities at the Conservatorium this week.

We will continue to monitor the Department of Health alerts and provide any important updates around other events as soon as they are available.

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Masterclasses give students a unique opportunity to develop their skills and work closely with leading artists from around the world. Audiences, whether student, teacher or enthusiast are given a glimpse as to what happens before and behind the stage. Don’t miss seeing these renown artists working with emerging artists in an intimate setting.

David Kim (Piano) David Hyun-Su Kim has distinguished himself as one of the most thoughtful and distinctive musicians to emerge from the newest generation of American pianists.

Join David as he works with students from the UWA Piano Studio ahead of their Lunchtime Concert performances on Wednesday 18 March.

Free entry - no bookings required
Tuesday 17
17:00 - CANCELLED - PERFORMANCE - UWA Music presents: Callaway Centre Research Seminar Series : David Kim More Information
Unfortunately this event has been cancelled.

In light of the recent developments around international visitors arriving in Australia, we have taken the sad decision to cancel David Kim’s activities at the Conservatorium this week.

We will continue to monitor the Department of Health alerts and provide any important updates around other events as soon as they are available.

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The Conservatorium of Music is a vibrant centre for research in music and music education, where a thriving community of scholars is engaged in exploring the frontiers of knowledge, working on a wide range of research projects with diverse outputs.

Our free weekly seminar series showcases presenters from within UWA and from the wider community.

David Kim | Beethoven on Historical Instruments: Case Studies in Interpretation

“Historically-Informed Performance” is mostly obviously characterized by its use of historical instruments, and HIP players are instantly recognizable by their hardware: fortepianos rather than modern Steinways, gut rather than metal strings, etc. While musical hardware is inarguably central to HIP’s project, the consequences of HIP-based thinking reach far beyond instruments. Taking Beethoven’s 250th as our cue, we will use case studies from Beethoven’s compositions to illustrate that technology is inextricably interwoven with musical style and can even shed new light on familiar compositions. Perhaps more importantly, these case studies will also be used to offer freeing interpretive possibilities, and even fresh perspectives on what it means to be a musician.

Bio – David Hyun-su Kim is a concert pianist specializing in historical performance, holds degrees from Harvard, Yale, and Cornell Universities, a Doctorate from the New England Conservatory, and serves as Associate Professor of music at Whitman College.

In celebration of Beethoven’s 250th, he will be performing an all-Beethoven program on Thursday, March 19th at 7:30. Further details https://www.trybooking.comBHVTJ

Free entry - no booking required

18:00 - PUBLIC TALK - What Does Intelligent Mobility Add to Sustainability? *Cancelled* Website | More Information
The Inaugural John Taplin Memorial Lecture in Transport, by Professor David A. Hensher, PhD FASSA

Due to ongoing concerns about the development of the COVID-19 virus and the importance of reducing its spread, we have made the difficult decision to cancel this public lecture. We apologise for any disappointment, however we believe that this is the most responsible course of action at this time, as the health and wellbeing of our community take priority. We hope to reschedule this event at a later date and will be in contact with details when they are available.
Wednesday 18
18:00 - PUBLIC TALK - Subsurface Energy Choices: challenges and opportunities *cancelled* Website | More Information
Unfortunately due to current travel restrictions, this event has been cancelled. We hope to be able to reschedule this event at a later date.

A public lecture by Professor Derek Elsworth, Center for Geomechanics, Geofluids, and Geohazards, Pennsylvania State University and Robert and Maude Gledden Short Stay Visiting Fellow.
Thursday 19
18:00 - PUBLIC TALK - White Australia has a Black History *event cancelled* Website | More Information
The 2020 Tom Stannage Memorial Lecture by Professor John Maynard, Chair of Aboriginal History, University of Newcastle and Director, Purai Global Indigenous History Centre.

Due to ongoing concerns about the development of the COVID-19 virus and the importance of reducing its spread, we have made the difficult decision to cancel this public lecture. We apologise for any disappointment, however we believe that this is the most responsible course of action at this time, as the health and wellbeing of our community take priority. We hope to reschedule this event at a later date.

19:00 - PERFORMANCE - The Irwin Street Collective presents David Kim More Information
David Hyun-Su Kim has distinguished himself as one of the most thoughtful and distinctive musicians to emerge from the newest generation of American pianists. A native of upstate New York, David holds degrees from Harvard, Yale, and Cornell universities and a doctorate from the New England Conservatory of Music in Boston. He has performed throughout the U.S., Canada, Austria, Germany, Italy, Belgium, the United Kingdom, South Korea, and Australia.

His current academic research focuses on performance practice, with particular emphasis on organology, historical recordings, performance style, improvisation, and notation.

As UWA Institute of Advanced Studies Visiting Fellow and Artist-in-Residence with the Irwin Street Collective, David will work closely with UWA Conservatorium of Music staff and students.

His visit will culminate in a lecture recital where he will perform (on Viennese fortepiano) Beethoven's Sonata in F major, Opus 10, No. 2, Sonata in F minor, Opus 2, No. 1, Andante Favori, WoO 57, Sonata in C# minor, Opus 27, No. 2 "Moonlight" plus Violin Sonata in G major, Opus 30, No. 3, with violinist Lauren Basney. Free entry | Bookings essential

https://www.trybooking.com/594707

In addition David will present a public masterclass with UWA piano students (Monday 16 March | 4pm | Callaway Auditorium | Free - no bookings required)

David will also present a session entitled 'Beethoven on Historical Instruments: Case Studies in Interpretation' as part of the Callaway Centre Research Seminar Series (Tuesday 17 March | 5pm | Eileen Joyce Studio | Free - no bookings required)
Thursday 26
18:00 - PUBLIC TALK - Historically Hot: Reimagining Beauty from Japan's Past *Cancelled* Website | More Information
A public lecture by Laura Miller, Eiichi Shibusawa-Seigo Arai Endowed Professor of Japanese Studies and Professor of History, University of Missouri–St. Louis and 2020 UWA Institute of Advanced Studies Visiting Fellow.

**Unfortunately due to travel restrictions, this public lecture has been cancelled. **

This presentation will feature several reimagined historical figures who are represented by actors, cosplayers, or drawn characters who reflect today's beauty ideology rather than those of the periods they are portraying. Although some efforts are made to depict the costumes and hairstyles of the period, the desire to cater to current beauty norms dominates these productions.

Laura Miller is an internationally prominent scholar of Japan studies and linguistic anthropology, as well as of the body and feminism, girl culture, mysticism and divination in Japan. After graduation from the University of California, Santa Barbara with BA degrees in Anthropology and Asian Studies, she supervised an English language program for a Japanese company in Osaka (1977-1981). She received her PhD in anthropology from the University of California, Los Angeles, in 1988.
Tuesday 31
18:00 - PUBLIC TALK - Oxygen Deprivation, temperature extremes and survival of the human brain *cancelled* : School of Human Sciences 2020 Seminar Series Website | More Information
A public lecture by Professor Philip Ainslie, University of British Columbia, Canada and 2020 UWA Institute of Advanced Studies Visiting Fellow.

Due to ongoing concerns about the development of the COVID-19 virus and the importance of reducing its spread, we have made the difficult decision to cancel this event.

We apologise for any disappointment this may cause, however we believe that this is the most responsible course of action at this time, as the health and wellbeing of our community take priority.

We hope to reschedule this talk at a later date.

 April 2020
Thursday 16
18:00 - PUBLIC TALK - Hormonal Changes with Age in Women and Men: Impacts of Exercise *cancelled* : School of Human Sciences 2020 Seminar Series Website | More Information
Due to ongoing concerns about the development of the COVID-19 virus and the importance of reducing its spread, we have made the difficult decision to cancel this event.

We apologise for any disappointment this may cause, however we believe that this is the most responsible course of action at this time, as the health and wellbeing of our community take priority. 



We hope to reschedule this talk at a later date.

19:00 - PUBLIC TALK - Keeping People Healthy and Out of Hospital: treating the global inactivity pandemic *cancelled* : School of Human Sciences 2020 Seminar Series Website | More Information
Due to ongoing concerns about the development of the COVID-19 virus and the importance of reducing its spread, we have made the difficult decision to cancel this event.

We apologise for any disappointment this may cause, however we believe that this is the most responsible course of action at this time, as the health and wellbeing of our community take priority. 



We hope to reschedule this talk at a later date.

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