UWA Logo What's On at UWA
   UWA HomeProspective Students  | Current Students  | Staff  | Alumni  | Visitors  | About  |     Search UWA    for      
 

What's On at UWA

* Login to add events... *
Today's date is Thursday, October 22, 2020
Institute of Advanced Studies
 May 2018
Tuesday 08
18:00 - PUBLIC TALK - Youth in Wartime: medievalist fictions for Victorian children. Website | More Information
A public lecture by Andrew Lynch, Professor of English and Cultural Studies, UWA.

The middle ages acquired a higher cultural prestige in nineteenth-century ideas of English national heritage. Literature exemplifying the spirit of medieval ‘chivalry’ was called on to offer behavioural models to Victorian children, yet there was also a widespread critique of medieval war as marred by mercenary motives, atrocities and civilian suffering. Consciousness of the perceived violence and religious ‘superstition’ of the medieval past in general helped shape writers’ narrative and ideological strategies. With the Middle Ages commonly seen as the childhood of the present, their works focussed a larger debate about war’s place in the course of national history and the development of the English character. The talk will be illustrated by contrasting examples of medievalist fictions about youth growing to maturity in wartime, including Charlotte M. Yonge, The Lances of Lynwood (1855), Charles Kingsley, Hereward the Wake (1866) and Robert Louis Stevenson, The Black Arrow (1888).

This talk is part of the lecture series - Peace and War: Representations in European Art and Literature. The three lectures in this series, offered by UWA academics associated with the UWA Centre for Medieval and Early Modern Studies, focus on representations of war and peace in European art and literature. Collectively, they will examine the contexts and reception of cultural and political practices of war and peace in the medieval and early modern era from the perspectives of emotions history, medievalism, and gender studies. In this way, the series stands to challenge conventional interpretations of European life in wartime from the sixteenth- to the nineteenth century.
Wednesday 09
13:00 - PUBLIC TALK - Talking Allowed: Talking Aloud about Head Coverings, with Krishna Sen Website | More Information
Krishna Sen FAHA, Professor Emerita, Social Sciences, UWA asks the question, "Is there something particular about the hijab in our time or is ‘to cover or not to cover’ always a central political question?" in Talking Allowed an event series, in collaboration with UWA Institute of Advanced Studies, where a researcher or artist will give a short presentation on a topic of current relevance to the arts and culture, followed by discussion and debate.
Wednesday 16
18:00 - PUBLIC TALK - Savonarola and Botticelli: the visionary prophet and the penitent painter Website | More Information
A public lecture by Arvi Wattel, School of Design, The University of Western Australia.

After the French invasion in 1494, the Florentine people revolted against its de facto rulers and exiled the Medici family from Florence. Subsequently, the followers of the Dominican preacher Girolamo Savonarola (called piagnoni: weepers) instituted a theocratic government, taking fierce control over the city, while Savonarola was preaching the end of times and called for a large ‘bonfire of the vanities’ to ‘cleanse’ the city. Savonarola’s disgust of splendour is famous, but what exactly was the impact of his sermons and this theocratic government on the arts? How did artists respond to his attacks on their art and his calls for reform?

This lecture is part of a lecture series: A Window on Italy – The Corsini Collection: Masterpieces from Florence.

The Institute of Advanced Studies is pleased to present a series of lectures to be held in conjunction with the exhibition, A Window on Italy – The Corsini Collection: Masterpieces from Florence, which is being held at the Art Gallery of Western Australia from 24 February – 18 June 2018.

The exhibition is organised by the Galleria Corsini, Florence, Auckland Art Gallery Toi o Tãmaki, the Art Gallery of Western Australia and MondoMostre, Rome.
Thursday 17
18:00 - PUBLIC TALK - Fish Must Breathe! Website | More Information
A public lecture by Professor Daniel Pauly, Institute for the Oceans and Fisheries, University of British Columbia and 2018 UWA Institute of Advanced Studies Visiting Fellow.

One of the expected responses of marine fishes to ocean warming is decrease in body size, as supported by evidence from empirical data and theoretical modelling. The theoretical underpinning for fish shrinking is that the oxygen supply to large fish size cannot be met by their gills, whose surface area cannot keep up with the oxygen demand by their three-dimensional bodies. Although this logic has been recently challenged, it will be shown, in the context of Gill-Oxygen Limitation Theory (GOLT) that gills, because they must retain the properties of open surfaces, cannot avoid being limiting for fish growth. Also, besides explaining (1) the growth patterns of fish, a wide range of biological features of fish and other water-breathing organisms can be understood only when gill area limitation is used as an explanation, including (2) the decline of food conversion efficiency with size; (3) the size at which they reproduce; (4) the phenomenon known as ‘abortive maturation’; (5) why the fish of a given species are larger at the cold end of their distribution ranges; (6) why fish move into deeper/colder waters when they grow bigger; (7) why the growth and food conversion efficiency of farmed fish declines when oxygen supply is reduced; (8) why fish perform temperature-driven seasonal migrations (9) why global warming induces poleward migrations; (10) why the flesh of tuna that have fought for a long time at the end of a fishing line becomes inedible; (11) why the otoliths of fish and the statoliths of invertebrates form clear daily rings in larvae and juveniles, but in adults; (12) many other phenomena that are never ben elucidated before, or even perceived as requiring an explanation. The GOLT thus appears to have the potential of a powerful theory capable of acceleration progress in marine biology and limnology and the corresponding applied discipline, ie, fishery science and aquaculture.
Wednesday 23
18:00 - PUBLIC TALK - Duties to One's Own Population and Combatants in War: is there an "Internal" Humanitarian Law? Website | More Information
A public lecture by Frédéric Mégret, Associate Professor of Law and Dawson Scholar, Faculty of Law, McGill University and 2018 UWA Institute of Advanced Studies Visiting Fellow.

International humanitarian law is traditionally about the "other" side in the war, whether combatants or non-combatants. Just war theorists however have hinted at the idea that there is an "internal jus in bello" that applies in the relationship of the sovereign to its own population in war.

In this lecture, Professor Mégret will explore that possibility in existing international humanitarian law. To what extent are some rules in armed conflict actually about protecting one’s own population (eg: not recruiting child soldiers; not placing military assets next to civilian installations)? What if the state has duties towards its own combatants? The recent judgment of the International Criminal Court convicting Ntaganda for sexual slavery against one’s own troops points to this emerging dimension. It implicates some crucial debates about the relationship of international humanitarian law to international human rights law, and emphasizes some of the challenges involved: is there a risk, for example, of being too protective of the lives of one’s soldiers at the expense of non-combatants on the other side?

This public lecture is presented by the Australian Red Cross, the UWA Law School and the UWA Institute of Advanced Studies.
Thursday 24
18:00 - PUBLIC TALK - How to Treat Persons: two anchors of moral judgement Website | More Information
A public lecture by Robert Audi, John A. O’Brien Professor of Philosophy, University of Notre Dame (Indiana, US) and 2018 UWA Institute of Advanced Studies Visiting Fellow.

If we do what we morally ought to do, does that suffice for being a moral person? It would not for Aristotle, since doing what we ought to do does not entail acting from virtue. It would not for Kant, since we can do what we ought to do for morally inappropriate reasons. The question is harder for utilitarianism, but for many utilitarians, even regularly maximizing utility does not entail being a moral person. For common-sense intuitionism, too, doing the right deeds does not suffice for being a moral person.

This presentation will argue that our conduct goes beyond our deeds—even beyond those as motivated in a certain way—and that a suitable predominance of morally right conduct in life apparently does suffice for being a moral person. Showing this requires accounts of conduct, its governing norms, and how a theory of conduct embodies moral standards.
Thursday 31
18:00 - PUBLIC TALK - Antarctica Homeward Bound Voyage 2018 Website | More Information
A public lecture by Veronique Florec, Research Associate, Centre for Environmental Economics and Policy, The University of Western Australia.

Plastic pollution in the ocean has become one of the most challenging environmental issues of our time. In 30 years, there will be more plastic in the ocean than fish! Thousands of marine animals and seabirds are being killed every year, either due to entanglement or from ingestion of plastic waste. To tackle a problem of this magnitude, we require a global solution. But in some circles where some of the most important decisions that affect our planet are made, women are either absent or only present in small numbers. Globally, women hold less than 15% of leadership positions in STEMM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics and Medicine) despite research showing that gender-balanced teams are more effective.

Homeward Bound wants to change this and, over a period of 10 years, it’s planning to build a global network of 1,000 women in STEMM and equipping them with leadership skills so that they can heighten their influence in policy circles. A global initiative, Homeward Bound is an intensive 12-month leadership program for women in STEMM that culminates in an expedition to Antarctica. The program aims to enhance the impact of women in science in order to influence policy and decision making as it shapes the future of our planet.

As part of the program, we conducted research on plastic pollution in the ocean and are now looking to bring about change in this area. So what happens when you put 80 women — all passionate about science, gender equity and the state of our planet — on board a ship for 22 days in Antarctica? In a visually beautiful presentation, Veronique will share her experience of participating in the program, the lessons learned throughout the year, her research on plastic pollution in the ocean, and the amazing visit to the white continent.

About this Series: All at Sea - Restoration and Recovery.

Our Oceans and coasts provide us with food, energy, livelihoods, cultural and recreational opportunities, yet they are coming under increasing pressure. This UWA Institute of Advanced Studies - Oceans Institute Lecture Series explores the wonders of our seas, the challenges they face and how research at UWA- in a diverse range of fields including marine science, ocean engineering, health, humanities and social sciences- are contributing to sustainability.

 June 2018
Tuesday 05
18:00 - PUBLIC TALK - Triumphant Entries during the Italian Wars 1494-1559: celebrating alliances and displaying cultural prowess in the face of unsteady peace Website | More Information
A public lecture by Elizabeth Reid, Postdoctoral Research Fellow, UWA.

Between 1494 and 1559 two major European powers, the French Valois and the Austro-Spanish Habsburg fought a series of wars in a competitive bid to expand their territory into the Italian Peninsula. This period was characterised by ever-shifting allegiances, conspiracies, battles, and peace treaties. Major military victories or new alliances forged, and sealed by marriage, often occasioned a kind of ‘victory-lap’ whereby the triumphant ruler or his bride-prize entered allied territory and were treated to carefully orchestrated festivities. Artists, composers, poets and performers utilised gendered allegories to honour the entering party and to communicate the rich cultural identity of the city itself. Entries were just one level at which the politics of peace played on culturally engrained ideas of masculine strength juxtaposed with feminine vulnerability. This talk will contextualise and discuss key entries in light of this gendered framework. It is supported by a new ARC research project that aims to reconsider the events and cultural output of the Italian Wars through the lens of gender.

This talk is part of the lecture series - Peace and War: Representations in European Art and Literature. The three lectures in this series, offered by UWA academics associated with the UWA Centre for Medieval and Early Modern Studies, focus on representations of war and peace in European art and literature. Collectively, they will examine the contexts and reception of cultural and political practices of war and peace in the medieval and early modern era from the perspectives of emotions history, medievalism, and gender studies. In this way, the series stands to challenge conventional interpretations of European life in wartime from the sixteenth- to the nineteenth century.
Thursday 07
18:00 - PUBLIC TALK - Towards Zero Hunger (SDG2) in Africa Website | More Information
A public lecture by Frans Swanepoel, Research Professor, Centre for Advancement of Scholarship, University of Pretoria, South Africa and 2018 UWA Institute of Advanced Studies Visiting Fellow.

Currently there are 1.3 billion people in Africa; more than five times the population in 1950. By 2050, Africa’s population will double to 2.6 billion, eventually reaching 4.2 billion by the end of the century – just about the entire world population in 1977. Africa is also the world’s most food insecure continent, with relatively low levels of agricultural productivity, low rural incomes, high rates of malnutrition, and a significantly worsening food trade balance. Ironically Africa has sufficient land, water and human resources to be a substantial contributor to the world’s food balance sheet, and to contribute to the growing global demand for both food staples and higher value added food, as well as to energy markets. Agriculture and the food sector also present significant opportunity for employment and wealth creation. This critical role of agriculture in fostering sustained competitiveness and profitability in the sector, in the face of a world economy that is rapidly transformed into a knowledge and network economy is acknowledged both within the scientific community and in Governments at large. Without question, agriculture and capacity strengthening are now back on the development agenda as Africa refocuses towards achieving the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). African agriculture has a number of major strengths, but also faces a significant number of challenges, a set of unique opportunities. Africa has now entered a development stage where some analysts are taking a more positive outlook and narrative as opposed to the traditional ‘Afro-pessimism’ of the last five decades. A new school of thought is emerging, one that recognises that Africa is in a better position to help itself be food secure moving forward – agriculture has started growing, albeit slowly but sustainably over the last decade. However, a number of interesting trends distinguish the economic growth of Africa from other continents. The dominant growth detected here is by small intermediary groups who are responding to rapid urbanisation and the growing ‘middle-class’. Strategies to support growth in sustainable agriculture should thus be responsive to these trends in order to vastly improve food security on the African continent.
Tuesday 26
18:00 - PUBLIC TALK - Babylon, the Bible and the Australian Aborigines: missionary networks and theories of racial origin in the nineteenth century Website | More Information
A public lecture by Hilary Carey, Professor of Imperial & Religious History, University of Bristol; Conjoint Professor of History, University of Newcastle, NSW and 2018 UWA Institute of Advanced Studies Visiting Fellow.

[God] hath made of one blood all nations of men for to dwell on all the face of the earth, and hath determined the times before appointed, and the bounds of their habitation (Acts 17:26. KJV).

Until challenged by Darwinian evolution, Christians believed on excellent biblical authority that ‘all nations of men’ were God’s creation and there could be no fundamental division between them. From this it followed that all the extraordinary cultural diversity exhibited by the peoples of the world disguised an essential unity: they were ‘one blood’. This talk will examine the work of the Scottish schoolteacher Dr John Fraser (1834-1904) who sought to prove that the languages of the Australian Aborigines demonstrated that they were descended from the Dravidian peoples of southern India and were, ultimately, Babylonian in origin. Fraser’s views were published as part of his 1892 edition of the works of the missionary Lancelot Threlkeld (1877-1859) which was prepared as part of the New South Wales contribution to the World’s Columbian exhibition in Chicago in 1893. Fraser was both an able linguist and a skilled editor but those who have encountered the important work of Lancelot Threlkeld and his collaborator Biraban through his edition have found his biblical arguments distracting, if not bizarre.

This lecture will consider John Fraser as a representative of a Calvinist rear guard who sought to use the science of linguistics to defend the literal and scientific value of biblical narratives. Far from being a marginal figure, Fraser was at the centre of an extensive network of missionary linguists seeking to harmonise knowledge of Pacific and Aboriginal languages with scriptural deep history.

 July 2018
Tuesday 17
18:00 - PUBLIC TALK - The Nameless Artist in the Theatre of Memory: the challenges of writing on the artworking of Charlotte Salomon (1917-1943) Website | More Information
A public lecture by Griselda Pollock, Professor of Social and Critical Histories of Art and Director of the Centre for Cultural Analysis, Theory and History (CentreCATH), University of Leeds.

It took Griselda Pollock sixteen years to complete the monograph on an artist whose single monumental art work - Life? or Theatre? - comprising 784 paintings and 320 transparent overlays, using image, text and music was created in one year in 1941-42, before being placed in hiding in 1943. First exhibited in 1961, this work is still finding its place in the histories of modern art. Where can we situate a single work by an artist exiled from her own country and living under the threat of effacement from life itself? Why did she undertake this project? How has it been interpreted in ways that further exile it from being considered art historically? What resources are needed to makes its project and its work legible to us now?

Professor Pollock first encountered this work in 1994. Some elements of it were exhibited in Perth in 1997 as part of the benchmark feminist exhibition Inside the Visible curated by Catherine de Zegher. Why has writing this book taken so long? What challenges had to be met theoretically and art historically before she could resolve, in however preliminary a fashion, the issues posed by a single work created in one year in the darkest of European fascism by an artist who was murdered by her own government at the age of twenty-six and who created an unprecedented artwork as grand in scope and as deep in psychological penentration as a Thomas Mann novel, as edgy and sardonic as a Brechtian operatta, and as affecting and sonorous as an opera by Gluck?

This lecture will explore the challenges posed to art hstory by the artworking of Charlotte Salomon and reflect on the ethics of writing on this work and on journey to its completion.
Thursday 26
18:00 - PUBLIC TALK - Belonging and Displacement: experiences of people seeking asylum in Australia Website | More Information
A public panel presented by the Limina 13th Annual Conference and the UWA Institute of Advanced Studies.

There are 65.6 million people in the world displaced by war, poverty, and environmental disaster, who have been forced to give up their homes in search of safety and hope for themselves and their families (UNHCR Figures 2016). Of these, 27,626 were accepted as refugees in Australia in 2016, to begin their new life in rural and urban communities. How do you foster a sense of home in another country when you may be faced with trauma, cultural barriers, bureaucratic insecurity, and a political discourse of distrust?

In this panel as part of the 2018 Limina Conference – Home: Belonging and Displacement, we invite you to hear from three speakers who will share their insight, knowledge, and ideas about what it means to work for and create a new home in Australia. The panel will draw from their perspectives as community leaders, researchers, and individuals with lived experiences as refugees.

Facilitator: Fadzi Whande is the Inclusion and Diversity Adviser for The University of Western Australia. She is a Global Diversity and Inclusion Strategist and award winning Social Justice Advocate.

Panellists:

Sara Shengeb recently graduated from UWA with Bachelor of Science. She works part time for the Youth Affairs Council of Western Australia (YACWA). Currently she serves as a Ministerial Advisor to the Hon. Paul Papalia (Minister for Citizenship and Multicultural Interests). At YACWA she coordinates two major programmes, Catalyst Youth Summit and ShoutOut. Sara continues to work for young people of WA which led her to be recognized as a finalist for the Australian Young People’s Human Right Medal in 2016, WA Young Achiever Award 2018 finalist and she was named Young Citizen of the year 2017 by her local government.

Bella Ndayikeze grew up in a refugee camp in Tanzania, with her mother working for UNHCR and father working as a teacher. She lived in the refugee camp for seven years before her family was granted a humanitarian visa to Australia. They arrived in 2005. It was a difficult transition, compounded when her family was torn apart by domestic violence and her mother was left to raise five children. In 2009 Bella began with the Edmund Rice Centre’s Youth sports program and was invited to be a youth leader in 2010. In 2011 she became the first black African female AFL coach in Australia, as the assistant coach of the Edmund Rice Lions, and also began a traineeship at the WA Football Commission in 2012. In 2014 she became co-ordinator of the Edmund Rice Lions team and debuted as an AFL player with West Perth Football Club. In that same year she also coordinated the Edmund Rice Youth leadership and Arts Program. In 2016 she launched her business Ignite Creative Media, joined the Global Shapers team in Perth and coached at the Female AFL Diversity Championships. In 2017 she was employed by the Federal Member for Cowan and became a member of the first ever Youth Ministerial Advisory Council.

Associate Professor Caroline Fleay teaches human rights and conducts research into the experiences of people seeking asylum in Australia at the Centre for Human Rights Education. She has been a regular visitor to some of WA’s sites of immigration detention and written extensively about the impacts on people seeking asylum of indefinite detention and being released into the community with minimal supports. Caroline has also been involved with a range of community groups and human rights campaigns over the past three decades. In 2011 she was awarded the Amnesty International Australia (WA) June Fassina Award for her contributions to human rights activism, and in 2017 she was a finalist for the United Nations Association of Australia Award for the Promotion of Human Rights. Caroline is currently a Board Member of the Refugee Council of Australia and continues to liaise with WA, national and regional refugee support organisations and activists to campaign on the rights of people seeking asylum.

 August 2018
Thursday 02
18:00 - PUBLIC TALK - Finding our Place in the Universe : The 2018 George Seddon Memorial Lecture by Professor David Blair Website | More Information
The 2018 George Seddon Memorial Lecture by David Blair, Emeritus Professor, ARC Centre of Excellence for Gravitational Wave Discovery.

Over less than two human lifetimes, discoveries in physics transformed the world and our sense of place in the universe. We harnessed electromagnetic waves, thereby shrinking our planet to a village; an infinitesimal speck in a vast and inflating universe. After a long struggle, we learnt how to detect waves of space, gravitational waves, which allow us to hear the universe, thereby changing our sense of the universe once again. Each wave of discovery re-emphasises our transient and improbable existence in an equally transient universe. Our treasure, which is our life and our planet, grows in value as each successive discovery uncovers more and more threads on which our existence depends.

Gravitational science has linked Western Australia to the world and to the whole universe. Einstein’s revolutionary theory of gravity was created while Western Australians were fighting in the first world war. In 1920 while Western Australia was still mourning those killed and wounded, Professor Alexander Ross, Foundation Professor of Physics at UWA campaigned for an international expedition to test Einstein’s extraordinary new theory during an eclipse of the Sun, best seen at Wallal Downs in the Kimberley. Two years later under instructions from Prime Minister Billy Hughes, a Trans Australian steam train carried a team of US astronomers and huge telescopes through Kalgoorlie and Guildford, en route to Wallal Downs. They provided the first indisputable proof of Einstein’s prediction that space is warped by matter.

On 15th September 2015, a vast explosion of gravitational waves was detected by an International team that included more than 20 West Australians. They shared in the world’s richest science prize. The gold that enriched Western Australia was itself a mystery: where is gold created? In 2017 the same team heard a long drawn out siren sound of rippling space - the signature of colliding neutron stars. In their final crash, they slung out blobs of neutrons that exploded like a vast atomic bomb. The Zadko telescope at UWA’s Gingin Centre and many other telescopes observed this explosion and the tell-tale signature of gold.

The annual George Seddon Lecture is sponsored by the UWA Institute of Advanced Studies and UWA’s Friends of the Grounds.
Wednesday 08
18:00 - PUBLIC TALK - Three Kinds of Clay, Three Kinds of Antiquity? : The 2018 Tom Stannage Memorial Lecture Website | More Information
The 2018 Tom Stannage Memorial Lecture by Ann McGrath AM, the Kathleen Fitzpatrick ARC Laureate Fellow and Distinguished Professor, School of History, Australian National University

In this memorial lecture, Professor McGrath will focus upon the story of how ‘Terra Australis’ or ‘Sydneia’ - Linnaean classifications for Sydney’s ‘primitive earth’ – became an agent in the importation of Anglo-Hellenic antiquity. What might such clay stories, replete with alluring female figures, reveal about plans to transform a strange earth? How could a fantastically storied antiquity, with it super-corporeal characters, co-exist with the Enlightenment’s fascination with science? Do Indigenous songlines provides clues? And how might such questions relate to the more recent articulations of deep human pasts associated with ancient places like Lake Mungo and the many sites currently being researched in Western Australia?

The 2018 Tom Stannage Memorial Lecture - This memorial lecture commemorates the exceptional contribution made by Professor Tom Stannage (1944-2012) to the Western Australian community. Professor Stannage was a prominent Australian historian who worked hard to foster a wider understanding of Western Australian history and heritage. He is remembered as an inspiring teacher and a passionate advocate for the study of history.
Thursday 09
18:00 - TALK - Just Not Cricket. Aspects of the ball tampering saga Website | More Information
A panel discussion presented by the UWA School of Human Sciences (Exercise and Sport Science) and the UWA Institute of Advanced Studies.

Why Tamper? Understanding the aerodynamics of a cricket ball - Professor Andrew Cresswell, Head, School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences and Professor of Biomechanics/Neurophysiology at The University of Queensland and 2018 UWA Institute of Advanced Studies Visiting Fellow.

Professor Cresswell will present an overview of how a cricket ball behaves in flight. Particular focus will be on the material properties and characteristics of the ball. This will lead to a description of the aerodynamics of a stationary and rotating cricket ball. The aerodynamic effects of the ball’s surface properties and speed will be discussed.

The Law: caught and bowled - Dr Tony Buti, Member for Armadale, WA State Parliament and Honorary Fellow, Law School, The University of Western Australia.

In this talk Dr Buti will provide a commentary on the law of cricket and the process leading to the sanctions imposed on Steve Smith, David Warner and Cameron Bancroft, then move on to discussing issues of sporting contracts, sports tribunals and behavioural misconduct by athletes.

Caught out: a perspective on ethical behaviour in sport - Associate Professor Sandy Gordon, The University of Western Australia, Registered Sport Psychologist.

Dr Gordon will present a critical perspective on the topic, which explains behaviour in professional sport from a rarely considered ideological viewpoint, and comment on social psychological factors such as apparent misuse of power, group think and risky shift phenomena. Suggestions for sport organisations on value-proofing will be offered and also his personal opinion on the ‘character-building and sport’ relationship.

18:00 - PUBLIC TALK - Sleep, Body Clocks and Health: biology to new therapeutics Website | More Information
A public lecture by Russell Foster, Professor of Circadian Neuroscience, Senior Fellow Brasenose College, University of Oxford and 2018 UWA Institute of Advanced Studies Visiting Fellow.

Our internal 24 hour biological clock (circadian clock) and daily sleep processes interact to play an essential, yet poorly recognised, role in our lives. Sleep is not just the simple suspension of physical movement but is an active state when the brain coordinates indispensable activities that define our ability to function whilst awake. The quality of our sleep profoundly influences our cognition, levels of social interaction, empathy, alertness, mood, memory, physical strength, susceptibility to infection, and every other aspect of our waking biology. We are beginning to understand how these critical processes are generated and regulated and many surprising findings have surfaced. For example, until recently it seemed inconceivable to most vision researchers and ophthalmologists that there could be an unrecognised type of light sensor within the eye. Yet we now know that there exists a “3rd class” of photoreceptor in the eye that detects the dawn/dusk cycle and which sets the internal clock to the solar day. The past decade has witnessed remarkable progress in understanding how the brain generates and regulates our daily patterns of sleep and wake. In parallel with this understanding, there has been a growing realisation that our sleep and circadian rhythms cannot be ignored in our headlong dash to generate a 24/7 society. This presentation will review the biology of sleep and circadian rhythms, what happens when these systems go wrong and how recent discoveries are allowing new therapeutics to be developed that will help correct abnormal patterns of sleep and wake.
Monday 13
18:00 - PUBLIC TALK - Black Bodies, White Gold: cotton, art and the materiality of race Website | More Information
A public lecture by Anna Arabindan-Kesson, Assistant Professor of Black Diasporic Art, Princeton University.

This talk examines the visual relationship between the cotton trade and the representation of blackness in American culture, using historical case studies and contemporary art. Juxtaposing contemporary interventions with historical moments, it examines how cotton materially influenced the way black Americans were seen, and represented themselves, as both enslaved and free. It argues that tracing this relationship deepens our understanding of the intersections of vision, value and subjectivity in the production of racial identity in nineteenth-century America, and also today.
Thursday 16
18:00 - EVENT - The ‘Civitas Pia’ of Pope Pius IV (1561-1565) Website | More Information
Permittitur tamen - It’s Ok to Grow Artichokes There. The ‘Civitas Pia’ of Pope Pius IV (1561-1565)

A public lecture by Roger Vella Bonavita, Honorary Senior Research Fellow, The University of Western Australia

The Medici Pope Pius IV (1559-1565) built the suburb now called Borgo Pio (originally named Civitas Pia) and the third enceinte of Castel S. Angelo, also completing the enceinte around the Vatican (unfinished since 1532). He also planned to replace Aurelian’s ancient walls (18 kilometres long) around Rome with gunpowder fortifications.

Capitano Francesco Laparelli da Cortona, a brilliant but obscure Tuscan engineer, was put in charge of these projects by his patron and friend Gabrio Serbelloni; a nephew of Pius IV, governor of Rome, and superintendent of the fortifications in the papal states who was himself a distinguished soldier and military engineer. The role of the pope himself, even in technical discussions, is important too. These projects must be seen in the context of the crying need for up to date defences to enable the papacy to maintain its independence against pressures from Spain (and France).

This illustrated public lecture will highlight the fascinating story of the preparation of the new urban area: which involved levelling the site, demolishing the ninth century church of S. Maria Traspontina and its adjacent Carmelite monastery besides laying out the streets, sewers, water supply and civic buildings and finally the building regulations promulgated by Pius IV for his Civitas Pia in the Bull Romanorum decet Pontificem (August 1565), which for very good reasons specifically permitted the cultivation of artichokes outside the walls of the new city.

Pius sent Laparelli to Malta in November 1565 to assist the Order of St John after it survived a four month siege by the Ottoman Turks. There he designed and built a new fortified capital called Valletta.

18:00 - PUBLIC TALK - Water for Chocolate - becoming a food and water literate consumer Website | More Information
An 'All at Sea' public lecture by Professor Anas Ghadouani, Head, Aquatic Ecology and Ecosystems Studies and Programme Chair, Environmental Engineering, The University of Western Australia.

Do you think you’re water literate? More than 80% of Australians know little about the most important thing keeping them alive. Where do you think you use the most water? Washing? Flushing? Watering the garden? Wrong – and Professor Anas Ghadouani, a passionate and self-confessed water geek, has some surprising news for you. But if you love chocolate he has some not-so-great news too… Anas is passionate about all aspects of water engineering and management. With more than 20 years of experience, which took has taken him all over the world while researching water in a wide and diverse range of environments, Anas has developed a unique, integrated and solution-focused approach for the study of water issues. In this public lecture Anas will discuss ways to reduce your water footprint and close the loop on the water cycle at a local level.

All at Sea: Restoration and Recovery Series- Our oceans and coasts provide us with food, energy, livelihoods, cultural and recreational opportunities, yet they are coming under increasing pressure.

This UWA Institute of Advanced Studies - UWA Oceans Institute Lecture Series explores the wonders of our seas, the challenges they face and how research at UWA- in a diverse range of fields including marine science, ocean engineering, health, humanities and social sciences- are contributing to ensure sustainability.
Wednesday 22
18:00 - PUBLIC TALK - How to Make a Revolutionary Object: the drawings of Gustavs Klucis Website | More Information
A public lecture by Professor Maria Gough, Joseph Pulitzer, Jr. Professor of Modern Art, Harvard University.

This talk focuses on a corpus of presentation drawings for new media-driven structures for the revolutionary street: radio-orators, projection screens, advertising stands, slogan signs, and newspaper kiosks. Executed in the early 1920s by Gustavs Klucis (Gustav Klutsis), a Latvian immigrant to Moscow who would later enjoy renown as the leading Soviet photomonteur of the interwar period, these striking drawings have long captivated artists, architects, and designers due to their optical dynamism and graphic presence, explicit intertwining of radical aesthetics and agitational politics, and perspicacious concatenation of media and small-form architecture for revolutionary purposes.

Professor Gough is in Australia as a Visiting Professor at Edith Cowan University and this guest lecture is sponsored by the Edith Cowan Centre for Global Issues.

Alternative formats: Default | XML


Top of Page
© 2001-2010  The University of Western Australia
Questions? Mail [email protected]