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Today's date is Wednesday, October 21, 2020
Institute of Advanced Studies
 July 2017
Thursday 27
18:00 - PUBLIC TALK - Challenging justice – changing lives : The 2017 Limina Conference Public Lecture by Estelle Blackburn OAM Website | More Information
It is generally agreed that 1% of the prison population are innocent inmates who are the victims of injustice. This presentation will detail two wrongful convictions in 1961 and 1963 and how a Perth journalist with no legal training could succeed in gaining the innocent men’s exonerations 40 years later, winning against the odds after they had lost seven combined appeals in the 60s.

When John Button’s manslaughter conviction was quashed by the WA Court of Criminal Appeal in 2002, and Darryl Beamish’s wilful murder conviction was quashed in 2005, they were the longest standing convictions to be overturned in Australia.

As well as the exonerations, the work corrected Perth’s history. Eric Edgar Cooke, the perpetrator of the two murders and the last person executed in WA, had been remembered for killing six people and attempting to kill two more in 1963. Cooke is now recognised for eight murders and 14 attempted murders over a five-year period from 1958.

The work also gave a voice to 12 of Cooke’s previously-unknown attempted murder victims, gave hope to innocent prisoners and raised public awareness of wrongful conviction and its causes: police misconduct including blinkered investigation, over-zealous prosecutors, weak legal representation for the uneducated and marginalised, false confessions, fabricated evidence by witnesses with incentives, faults in forensics, eyewitness misidentification and fallible memory. While not the cause in the Button and Beamish cases, the fallibility of eyewitness memory has been found to be the greatest contributor to wrongful conviction – 72% of eyewitness identifications being wrong in the US Innocence Project’s successful exoneration cases.

This lecture is part of the 2017 Limina Collective Conference - Memory: Myth and Modernity. Visit www.limina.arts.uwa.edu.au for more information.

Estelle Blackburn is a writer whose determined sleuthing uncovered the truth about Perth’s most notorious serial killer, Eric Edgar Cooke. Her investigative journalism, authorship of Broken Lives and citizen advocacy led to the exoneration of convicted killers John Button and Darryl Beamish, 40 years after they were wrongfully convicted of Cooke murders. Estelle was a journalist for The West Australian then the ABC, before becoming a press secretary to several WA Ministers and a Premier. The winner of many awards including an OAM, WA Citizen of the Year (Arts and Entertainment), WA Woman of the Year, Premier’s Award for non-fiction, and journalism’s top honour, a Walkley Award for the most outstanding contribution to the profession, she is also an inductee into the WA Womens Hall of Fame. Now working in Canberra, Estelle still spends her spare time crusading against wrongful conviction.

 August 2017
Tuesday 08
13:00 - PRESENTATION - Talking Allowed: Art and Leadership : ‘Talking Allowed’ is a new series of presentations offered by the UWA Institute of Advanced Studies and the Lawrence Wilson Art Gallery. Website | More Information
In this Talking Allowed, Robin McClellan will explore the ways in which art can be utilized as a galvanising tool to provoke thought leadership, by challenging and encouraging discussion whilst also evoking emotional connection to social issues and new ways of being. Robin McClellan is the Chief Executive Officer of Leadership WA. Prior to this role, Robin was the Director of Minerals Research Initiatives at Curtin University. Before that she was based in Singapore as ExxonMobil Corporation’s Senior Advisor for Asia Pacific Government Relations. From 2004 to 2007 she served as the US Consul General during her 24-year career in the US diplomatic service.

‘Talking Allowed’ is a new series of presentations offered by the UWA Institute of Advanced Studies and the Lawrence Wilson Art Gallery.

On the second Tuesday of every month, a UWA academic will give a short presentation on a topic of current relevance to the arts and culture before inviting the audience to participate in discussion and debate.

‘Talking Allowed’ is designed to be thought-provoking, challenging, stimulating and engaging. Come along and join the dialogue on matters that are of great importance to our society.

18:00 - PUBLIC LECTURE - Luther’s Reformation at 500: Luther’s Image and the First Media War : This is an Institute of Advanced Studies and Centre for Medieval and Early Modern Studies series of lectures. Website | More Information
Martin Luther was the media superstar of his time. Thousands of painted and printed portraits of Luther were issued particularly during the early years of the Reformation. Some were even signed by Luther in the first recorded instance of a celebrity sending out autographed portraits. These likenesses did not simply chronicle Luther’s life, they created his image - as a doctor of the Church, as a divinely inspired prophet, as a heroic outlaw, or (in the hands of Luther’s adversaries) as a devilish miscreant.

This lecture will explore how these portraits both responded to and boosted Martin Luther’s importance to the success of the Reformation, as they lent a face to the cause and allowed wider audiences to follow the fate of a charismatic figurehead.

Susanne Meurer is a lecturer in Art History at UWA. Her research interests are art historiography, prints and printmaking, Northern Renaissance and Baroque. Her most recent publication is “Aus aller Herren Länder” – Die Künstler der Teutschen Academie von Joachim von Sandrart, ed. by Susanne Meurer, Anna Schreurs, Lucia Simonato, Brepols 2015.

About this Series

On the 500th anniversary of the beginning of the Protestant Reformation, this UWA Institute of Advanced Studies – Centre for Medieval and Early Modern Studies Lecture Series reconsiders the legacy of Martin Luther, who in 1517 published Ninety-Five Theses criticising the Church’s sale of indulgences. From diverse historical perspectives, UWA researchers tackle key issues regarding Luther’s life, his thought, and his significance for the momentous changes that Europe underwent during his lifetime.

https://www.mems.arts.uwa.edu.au/
Friday 11
9:00 - CONFERENCE - Do Women Matter? South Asian and Middle Eastern Perspectives More Information
UPDATED with payment details. Buy tickets via:

https://payments.uwa.edu.au/DoWomenMatterSouthAsianMiddleEasternPerspectives

Centre for Muslim States and Societies, The University of Western Australia, invites you to an interdisciplinary conference, Do Women Matter? South Asian and Middle Eastern Perspectives.

The conference is being organized to develop understanding of the role South Asian and Middle Eastern women play as agents of change in the region and globally, and how this agency is manifested in different environments and spaces. It specifically focuses on their participation in the social, cultural and political arena in these societies and the challenges women face. The ultimate aim is to shed light on how women from these regions have shaped local, regional and global interactions in the contemporary world.

Dates: 11 to 12 August 2017

Times: 9.00AM to 5.00PM, 11 August AND 9.00AM to 1PM, 12 August

Venue: The Karrakatta Club Incorporated 4 Sherwood Court, Perth W.A. 6000

Cost:

Students: A$30 first day; A$20 second day Others: $50 first day; A$45 second day

Note: The costs cover morning tea, lunch and afternoon on the first day and morning tea and lunch on the second day.

Confirmed speakers and topics: Dr Huda Al-Tamimi, Effects of Iraq’s parliamentary gender quota on women’s political mobilisation and legitimacy post-2003, Australian Nation University

Associate Professor Savitree Thapa Gurung, Role of women in Nepal in shaping debates on public policy and use of authority, Commission for the Investigation of Abuse of Authority Government of Nepal, and Tribhuvan University

Leila Kouatly, Lebanese women through film: the illusion of empowerment, The Australian National University

Setayesh Nooraninejad, Women's political-love letters and writing practices: the public dimension of personal correspondence with prisoners of conscience in Iran, The Australian National University

Dr Zahra Taheri, Breaking boundaries and raising voices: women in Iranian cinema, The Australain National University

Professor Samina Yasmeen, Women's agency in jihad: narratives of Jamat ud Dawah and Lashker-e-Taiba, The University of Western Australia

Dr M. Murat Yurtbilir, Islamist in form, patriarchal in content: role of women in Turkey under Justice and Development Party, Australian National University
Thursday 17
18:30 - SCREENING - The Destruction of Memory - FULLY BOOKED / SOLD OUT : A film screening followed by panel session Website | More Information
A powerful award-winning film on the war against culture, and the battle to save it. Over the past century, cultural destruction has wrought catastrophic results across the globe. In Syria and Iraq, the ‘cradle of civilization’, millennia of culture have been destroyed. But the push to protect, salvage and rebuild has moved in step with the destruction. Legislation and policy have played a role, and heroic individuals have risked and lost their lives to protect not just other human beings, but our cultural identity — to save the record of who we are. Based on the book of the same name by Robert Bevan, The Destruction of Memory tells the whole story — looking not just at the ongoing actions of Daesh (ISIS) and at other contemporary situations, but revealing the decisions of the past that allowed the issue to remain hidden in the shadows for so many years. Interviewees in the film include the Director-General of UNESCO, the Prosecutor of the International Criminal Court, as well as diverse and distinguished international experts, whose voices combine to address this urgent issue. The film has screened in a wide range of settings, including at the British Museum, for UNESCO, at universities such as Harvard, Brown and Oxford, and at film festivals globally. This event is co-sponsored by the UWA Institute of Advanced Studies, Faculty of Arts, the History Council of WA, and the National Trust WA. Panelists Andrea Witcomb is Professor of Cultural Heritage and Museum Studies at Deakin University. Her research focuses on the interpretation of difficult histories and heritage sites. Her books include Reimagining the Museum and (with Kate Gregory) From the Barracks to the Burrup: The National Trust in Western Australia. Benjamin Smith is Associate Dean (Research) in the Faculty of Arts, Business, Law and Education. He is Professor of World Rock Art. He coordinates the Master of Heritage Studies. He is President of the International Committee on Rock Art of the International Council on Monuments and Sites and a former President of the PanAfrican Archaeological Association. He is happiest when working in remote rural areas with communities on matters of importance to them concerning their heritage. John Taylor FRAIA M.ICOMOS BArch(UWA), MA (York), PhD (UWA) is a national and international award winner for heritage work. John has extensive experience and knowledge of Australian heritage, combining valuable technological expertise within the adaptive re-use of heritage places. He is an Honorary Research Fellow at UWA. Rebecca Repper is an affiliate researcher with the Endangered Archaeology in the Middle East and North Africa Project, University of Oxford. Using satellite imagery, the project maintains a photographic database and monitors threats to cultural heritage in the region. Rebecca is particularly interested in photographic archives and the accurate communication and utilisation of these resources. Chair and MC Jenny Gregory AM is Emeritus Professor of History at UWA. She has published widely on aspects of urban history and heritage. She is an Executive Member of the National Trust WA, after many years as Chair and President, was a member of the Heritage Council of WA and is currently President of the History Council of WA.
Tuesday 22
18:00 - EVENT - Shock Room: We do as we’re told. Or do we? : A film screening followed by Q+A panel session with Director Professor Kathryn Millard, Macquarie University; Professor Carmen Lawrence, UWA; and Dr Nin Kirkham, UWA. Website | More Information
A compelling new feature documentary, Shock Room breaks open Stanley Milgram’s dramatic ‘Obedience to Authority’ experiment and forces us to re evaluate its conclusions. In the wake of the Holocaust, Milgram wanted to understand why people inflict harm on others. In 1962, he staged his experiment. Under the guise of participating in a study on memory and learning, participants were asked to inflict apparently lethal shocks on a fellow human being. Milgram later famously claimed that 65% of us will blindly follow orders.

My Lai, Rwanda, Enron, Abu Graib, the Deep Horizon Oil Spill, the News of the World phone hacking – ‘I was only following orders’ is through history. But extensive research from Sydney filmmaker and self professed Milgram obsessive, Kathryn Millard, reveals that Milgram ran more than 25 versions of his experiment, filming only one. And that, overall, the majority of people actually resisted.

Fifty years after Milgram’s original experiments, Millard, with a team of filmmakers and psychologists, re-staged Milgram’s experiments in Sydney, Australia, with actors using director Millard’s unique immersive realism technique. Shock Room combines dramatisations, animation, archival film and interviews with psychologists Alex Haslam and Steve Reicher, providing new insights about how and why people refuse to inflict harm and the conclusions of the world’s most famous psychology experiment.

Millard’s feature length documentary reveals the creative consequences of the impact of art on science … and science on art.

Professor Kathryn Millard is a writer, filmmaker and dramaturg. Psychology, mental health, popular fallacies and the afterlife of images are recurring themes in Kathryn’s body of work which spans award-winning feature dramas, documentaries and hybrids. Major credits include the feature documentaries Shock Room and The Boot Cake, the feature dramas Travelling Light and Parklands and Light Years about Australian photographer Olive Cotton. Awarded writing fellowships by the National Film and Sound Archive, Tyrone Guthrie Centre (Ireland), Varuna Writers’ Centre and Screen NSW, Kathryn was Visiting Fellow in Film Studies at Yale University 2012. In her monograph Screenwriting in a Digital Era (2014) Kathryn finds the seeds of innovative screenwriting in the experiments of the past. On new projects, she continues to revisit landmark psychology experiments and explores the history of colour film in Australia. Kathryn is Professor of Screen and Creative Arts at Macquarie University, Sydney.

Professor Carmen Lawrence teaches in the School of Psychological Science, Faculty of Science, at UWA. Carmen’s research focuses on the forces that drive significant social change as well as exploring our reactions to change.

Dr Nin Kirkham teaches philosophy in the School of Humanities, Faculty of Arts, Business,Law and Education, at UWA. Nin’s research area is normative and applied ethics, with a particular focus on issues in environmental ethics and bioethics.

This event is a collaboration between the UWA School of Social Science, the School of Psychological Science and the Institute of Advanced Studies.
Tuesday 29
18:00 - PUBLIC LECTURE - In Absentia: The Politics of Cameraless Photography : A public lecture by Professor Geoffrey Batchen, Art History, Victoria University Website | More Information
How can a photograph of nothing—of nothing discernable or apparently significant—be said to offer some useful political purchase on the world it inhabits? How can a photograph that represents, but does not depict, a given situation be freighted with historical knowledge and import? Confining itself primarily to examples of cameraless photography, from the 1830s to now, this paper will ask these questions with a view to determining a politics for such photographs in the present. It will argue that photographs which draw attention to their own coming into being assume photography is always already a politics; by engaging the visual and chemical grammar of the photograph, they dispute and challenge the fixity of that politics. In any case, to make such photographs today returns photography to a unique, hand-made craft and away from global capitalism and its vast economies of mass production and exploitation. Not that these photographs are innocent; on the contrary they are often generated by actions that are toxic, radioactive, enigmatic, violent, dangerous. Nor are they “abstract.” Instead, I will argue, they redefine the nature of both photography’s realism and its potential as a political agent.

Professor Geoffrey Batchen teaches art history at Victoria University of Wellington in New Zealand, specializing in the history of photography. His books include Burning with Desire: The Conception of Photography (1997), Each Wild Idea: Writing, Photography, History (2001), Forget Me Not: Photography and Remembrance (2004), William Henry Fox Talbot (2008), What of Shoes? Van Gogh and Art History (2009), Suspending Time: Life, Photography, Death (2010) and More Wild Ideas (forthcoming in Chinese, 2017). He has also edited Photography Degree Zero: Reflections on Roland Barthes's Camera Lucida (2009) and co-edited Picturing Atrocity: Photography in Crisis (2012). In April 2016 his exhibition, Emanations: The Art of the Cameraless Photograph, opened at the Govett-Brewster Art Gallery in New Plymouth, New Zealand. A book of the same name was published last year by Prestel. In October 2017 an exhibition curated under the direction of Batchen and titled Apparitions: The Photograph and its Image will open at the Adam Art Gallery at Victoria University of Wellington.
Wednesday 30
9:30 - Masterclass - Dissemination: The Photograph and its Image : A masterclass with Professor Geoffrey Batchen, Art History, Victoria University. Website | More Information
One of photography’s most distinctive features is its schizophrenia. Capable of shifting shape and identity in the blink of an eye, photography has always encompassed both material and immaterial manifestations, both physical objects grounded in specific configurations of time and space, and apparitional images floating free of any particular substrate and capable of endless reproduction in a variety of media and formats. The result is a process of spatial and temporal migration that makes photography a difficult phenomenon to define or fix in place. My seminar will trace a history for this migration, examining the consequences of the reproducibility of photographs, the role of the negative in the practice of analog photography, the relationship of a photograph to its image, and the various theoretical and practical challenges all this raises for the collection and study of photography. Participants will be invited to debate some proposed solutions to these challenges.

Reading

Geoffrey Batchen, ‘Origins without End,’ in Tanya Sheehan and Andres Zervignon eds., Photography and Its Origins (New York: Routledge, 2014), 67-81.

Geoffrey Batchen, ‘Double Displacement: Photography and Dissemination,’ in Thierry Gervais ed., The ‘Public’ Life of Photographs (Toronto: Ryerson Image Center/The MIT Press, 2016), 38-73.

Professor Geoffrey Batchen teaches art history at Victoria University of Wellington in New Zealand, specializing in the history of photography. His books include Burning with Desire: The Conception of Photography (1997), Each Wild Idea: Writing, Photography, History (2001), Forget Me Not: Photography and Remembrance (2004), William Henry Fox Talbot (2008), What of Shoes? Van Gogh and Art History (2009), Suspending Time: Life, Photography, Death (2010) and More Wild Ideas (forthcoming in Chinese, 2017). He has also edited Photography Degree Zero: Reflections on Roland Barthes's Camera Lucida (2009) and co-edited Picturing Atrocity: Photography in Crisis (2012). In April 2016 his exhibition, Emanations: The Art of the Cameraless Photograph, opened at the Govett-Brewster Art Gallery in New Plymouth, New Zealand. A book of the same name was published last year by Prestel. In October 2017 an exhibition curated under the direction of Batchen and titled Apparitions: The Photograph and its Image will open at the Adam Art Gallery at Victoria University of Wellington.

18:00 - PUBLIC LECTURE - Migrating ‘ndrangheta: Cultural bias and cultural differences in the policing of the Calabrian mafia between Italy and Australia : A public Lecture by Dr Anna Sergi, Lecturer in Criminology, Department of Sociology, University of Essex, UK Website | More Information
International media and popular culture have been perpetuating the presumption that criminals of Calabrian origins around the world must belong to, and replicate the structure of, the mafia-type Calabrian ‘ndrangheta clans in Italy. This presumption has been largely confirmed by Italian authorities and recently been considered by Australian ones. However, without analysis of the mechanisms of mafia mobility in the particular contexts of Australian cities and communities there is a danger of replicating awed conceptualisation of mafias as always hierarchical and monolithic from the USA while risking to miss the true nature of the Calabrian mafia phenomenon and its hybrid forms abroad.

This presentation will re ect upon contemporary challenges to police ethnic mafia-type organised crime groups across borders, when cultural traits of origins are deemed fundamental to the knowledge of the phenomenon, like in the case of the ‘ndrangheta. By looking at the way the Calabrian mafia is understood, conceptualised and contrasted in Italy and in Australia, this work will challenge stereotypes and bias from Italian authorities while also assessing the degree of cultural differences of the Calabrian clans abroad from the point of view of Australian law enforcement. The very core of this paper, therefore, is a reflection on the concepts of policing through cultural awareness, which requires an evaluation of concepts such as the culture and ethnicity within migrant groups as applied to behaviours typical of the “mafia method”, and with an attempt to overcome cultural relativism and ethnocentrism.

Dr Anna Sergi holds a PhD in Sociology from the University of Essex, UK, an LLM in Criminal Law, Criminology and Criminal Justice from King’s College, London and a specialist law degree from the University of Bologna, Italy.As a lecturer in Criminology at the University of Essex, she specialises in organised crime and mafia studies, from different perspectives, privileging comparative research approaches in policing and criminal justice methods. She has been a visiting fellow in different institutions, among which New York University, Flinders University, University of Melbourne, the Australian Institute of Criminology and the University of Montreal. Anna has published articles in various international peer-reviews journals and two books, one about the ‘ndrangheta and the ‘glocal’ dimensions of Calabrian mafia clans, and one of the policing of organised crime and mafias in Italy, UK, USA and Australia, both with Palgrave Macmillan. Currently, in 2017, she is working on a project on mafia mobility across Europe, Canada and Australia, funded by the British Academy and the Leverhulme Trust in the UK.
Thursday 31
18:00 - PUBLIC LECTURE - Rigs, Reefs and Re-cycling: how offshore infrastructure can be re-used to benefit our oceans : All at Sea: Restoration and Recovery Series Website | More Information
A public lecture by Professor Erika Techera, Director, Oceans Institute, The University of Western Australia.

The offshore oil and gas industry is facing the prospect of de-commissioning thousands of installations in the coming decades. In some parts of the world the issue is already pressing. The technical difficulty and financial cost of complete removal is significant, and therefore the prospect of leaving part of the installation in situ is attractive. Furthermore, it is clear that in some cases, marine ecosystems have established themselves around this infrastructure, and are providing ecosystem services. Nevertheless, despite the success of rigs-to-reef projects in the US it is unclear whether such initiatives are transferable to Australia given very different physical and jurisdictional contexts. UWA researchers are exploring the way forward through multi-disciplinary projects including engineering and technical advances, marine science, socio-economic, legal and sociological perspectives.

This lecture will explore the issues, the questions being examined and potential solutions for Australia and beyond.

About this Series: All at Sea - Restoration and Recovery

Our oceans and coasts provide us with food, energy, livelihoods, cultural and recreational opportunities, yet they are coming under increasing pressure. This UWA Institute of Advanced Studies – Oceans Institute Lecture Series explores the wonders of our seas, the challenges they face and how research at UWA - in a diverse range of fields including marine science, ocean engineering, health, humanities and social sciences – are contributing to ensure sustainability.

 September 2017
Wednesday 06
18:00 - PUBLIC LECTURE - Transforming the Lives of Children, Parents and Communities through Positive Parenting: myth or reality? : The 2017 inaugural Robin Winkler Lecture Website | More Information
The 2017 inaugural Robin Winkler lecture by Professor Matthew Sanders, Director, Parenting and Family Support Centre and Professor of Clinical Psychology, The University of Queensland.

This presentation will focus on the critical role of evidence-based parenting programs in the prevention of serious social, emotional and behavioural problems in children and child maltreatment. The impact of parenting on parental and child capacity to self-regulate and its impact on various aspects of development and wellbeing with be discussed. Learnings from large scale population-level implementation of evidence based parenting and family support interventions will be highlighted. The focus will be on the importance of using evidence based interventions, that are culturally informed, and have contemporary relevance to parents in an age of technology. Professor Saunders will attempt to answer the question “What we need to do as a community to shift the needle on child maltreatment and enhance children’s wellbeing at a whole of population level.”

Professor Sanders is considered a world authority on the development, implementation, evaluation, and global dissemination of evidence-based parenting and family intervention programs. He is the founder of the widely acclaimed Triple P-Positive Parenting Program developed under his leadership at the Parenting and Family Support Centre at the University of Queensland.

This lecture commemorates the work of Robin Winkler, a highly influential teacher and researcher whose work was guided by humanitarian values and a relentless questioning of accepted orthodoxies. He died at the age of 43 while heading the UWA clinical masters program at the Psychology Clinic, which now bears his name. In the Oxford Handbook of the History of Psychology he is described as “a singular, crusading figure” in Australian psychology.

This lecture is co-hosted by the UWA Institute of Advanced Studies and the School of Psychological Science.
Thursday 07
17:30 - PUBLIC LECTURE - UWA School of Music presents the 2017 Callaway Lecture : Richard Mills AM: Opera in the Mirror of History, Evolution or Extinction More Information
This year, the Institute of Advanced Studies and the School of Music celebrate the 50th anniversary of UWA’s tertiary education partner, West Australian Opera in inviting Dr Richard Mills to deliver the 2017 Callaway Lecture.

Richard Mills was artistic director of West Australian Opera for 15 years between 1997 and 2012 and is one of Australia’s most prolific and internationally recognised composers who pursues a diverse career as a composer, conductor and artistic director.

He has held numerous prestigious posts, and received many scholarships, fellowships and awards including an AM, in 1999. He is currently Artistic Director of Victorian Opera, and has previously been Artistic Director of the West Australian Opera 1997–2012, Director of the Australian Music Project for the Tasmanian Symphony Orchestra 2002–2008 and Musica Viva’s Composer of the Year in 2008.

Richard regularly conducts the leading orchestras and opera companies of Australia and has an extensive discography of orchestral works including his own compositions.

In this year’s lecture, Dr Mills will explore contemporary possibilities for the art form of opera, via an analysis of the origins of the art form and an inspection of a sequence of transformatory moments in its history.

Entry is free but please RSVP to [email protected]

Please join us for refreshments from 5.30pm. Lecture at 6pm
Monday 11
18:00 - PUBLIC LECTURE - Coping with Grief and Loss: ancient and modern perspectives Website | More Information
A public lecture by Professor Han Baltussen, the Walter Watson Hughes Professor of Classics, University of Adelaide and UWA Institute of Advanced Studies Visiting Fellow.

In this lecture Professor Baltussen will explore the rich repertoire of grief experiences from antiquity in an attempt to understand how humans have coped with loss and bereavement since the beginnings of Western literature.

If grief is a universal marker of humanity, these ancient experiences should resonate with us today. Given the renewed interest in the process of mourning, privately and publicly, it is also worthwhile considering whether the ancient coping strategies have any lessons to offer, in particular through the power of words (written or spoken). Modern bereavement advice tends to allow for a great variety of approaches, from rational evaluation to creative expression. Professor Baltussen will ask whether ancient grief practices could contribute anything to this emerging area of the ‘healing arts’.
Tuesday 12
13:00 - PUBLIC TALK - Is it OK to remove statues? : A 'Talking Allowed' event Website | More Information
With Associate Professor Clarissa Ball, Discipline Chair, History of Art, UWA School of Design, Director, UWA Institute of Advanced Studies.

The recent removal of Confederate statues in the United States has resulted in extraordinary acts of violence, heightened racial tensions and death. Debate continues to rage about whether or not the removal of public statues is akin to erasing the past and “changing history”, as President Trump put it. Is Trump right, or is the truth far more complex?

Closer to home, debate is mounting about Australia’s colonial monuments. Stan Grant’s statement that the inscription on the statue of James Cook in Sydney’s Hyde Park “maintains a damaging myth” has been met with astonishing claims. One commentator has gone so far as to liken Grant’s questioning of the statue’s plaque and its doctrine of discovery to the cultural destruction of the Taliban Left.

Join us for this Talking Allowed to consider what it is about statues that render them the focus of struggle and to explore some of the complexities that surround their removal or modification.

‘Talking Allowed’ is a new series of presentations offered by the UWA Institute of Advanced Studies and the Lawrence Wilson Art Gallery.

On the second Tuesday of every month, a UWA academic will give a short presentation on a topic of current relevance to the arts and culture before inviting the audience to participate in discussion and debate.

‘Talking Allowed’ is designed to be thought-provoking, challenging, stimulating and engaging. Come along and join the dialogue on matters that are of great importance to our society.

18:00 - PUBLIC LECTURE - Luther’s Reformation at 500: Luther and the Devil : This is an Institute of Advanced Studies and Centre for Medieval and Early Modern Studies series of lectures. Website | More Information
“If the Devil says to you “Do not drink”, you should reply to him “On this occasion I shall drink and what is more, I shall drink a generous amount.” (Martin Luther). To Martin Luther and most of his contemporaries the devil was a theological and material reality – to be confronted every day and by everybody. This paper will trace Luther’s view of the Devil and the supernatural and place it in the context of the world views of his time.

Jacqueline Van Gent is a Professor of History and Chief Investigator ARC Centre of Excellence for the History of Emotions, 1100-1800. Her work explores (i) emotions, conversions and missions, (ii) affective strategies of early modern Europeans in the acquisition, exchange and display of colonial objects, and (iii) the role of emotions in early ethnographic texts and collections. Her most recent publication with Professor Susan Broomhall is Dynastic Colonialism: Gender, Materiality and the Early Modern House of Orange-Nassau (Routledge, 2016).

About this Series

On the 500th anniversary of the beginning of the Protestant Reformation, this UWA Institute of Advanced Studies – Centre for Medieval and Early Modern Studies Lecture Series reconsiders the legacy of Martin Luther, who in 1517 published Ninety-Five Theses criticising the Church’s sale of indulgences. From diverse historical perspectives, UWA researchers tackle key issues regarding Luther’s life, his thought, and his significance for the momentous changes that Europe underwent during his lifetime.

https://www.mems.arts.uwa.edu.au/
Tuesday 19
18:00 - PUBLIC TALK - Resource Extraction versus Environmental Protection: oil sands and caribou in Canada : 2017 Rio Tinto Lecture Website | More Information
A public lecture by Professor Vic Adamowicz, Vice Dean, Faculty of Agricultural, Life and Environmental Sciences, and Professor, Department of Resource Economics and Environmental Sociology, University of Alberta.

This case study will illustrate some of the challenges of endangered species recovery, focussing on caribou in Alberta, Canada, and the threats they face from the oil sands industry.

In any jurisdiction involved in resource extraction there are concerns about the environmental impacts of the extractive activities, including impacts on natural systems, human health, scenery, recreational enjoyment, and other “ecosystem services”. Caribou have been listed as threatened in Canada for sometime, but strategies for their protection are complex and could have significant impacts on forestry and energy sectors. Issues of the development of recovery goals, the economic costs and benefits of caribou recovery, the importance of the timing of recovery, and the policy options that can help achieve recovery at least cost, will be addressed.

Economic analysis has been used to identify options and strategies for reducing adverse impacts and reducing the requirement for costly recovery to maintain the species.

The Rio Tinto Lecture at UWA is part of the Rio Tinto-UWA Education Partnership, established in 2013.

This event is sponsored by Rio Tinto, UWA Faculty of Science, and the UWA Institute of Advanced Studies.
Thursday 21
16:00 - PUBLIC TALK - History Post-Brexit: thinking through Britain, Europe and Empire Website | More Information
A public lecture by Tony Ballantyne, Professor of History and Pro-Vice Chancellor Humanities at the University of Otago, and Co-Director of the Centre for Research on Colonial Culture.

The links between British empire building and its shifting relationships with Europe have frequently been overlooked by historians, in part because they have been seen as two fundamentally distinct fields of inquiry.

Using the debates around Brexit as it departure point, this talk explores some of the key connections between the project of empire building and Britain’s engagements with Europe, tracing some key points of convergence from the 1760s on. But it will also explore the shifting terrain of recent historiography, tracing the ways in which Europe and empire have figured within British historical writing since the 1970s and how those relationships have also figured in important work from the former settler colonies.
Monday 25
18:00 - EVENT - Post-Memory: You’ve Mistaken Me for a Butterfly Website | More Information
A multi-media peformance and discussion with artists Mayu Kanamori and Terumi Narushima, Institute of Advanced Studies Visiting Fellows.

Performance maker Mayu Kanamori and artist Terumi Narushima present a live performance of their work You’ve Mistaken Me for a Butterfly.

A multi-media presentation with piano accompaniment, Butterfly tells the story of Okin, a Japanese prostitute who travelled to the goldfields in Western Australia in the late 19th century.

Following the performance, Mayu will present a brief lecture, discussing story-telling and memory-making in performance, and some of the issues of identity, heritage, and gender that this work addresses.

After the lecture, there will be time for audience Q&A and discussion with the artists.

 October 2017
Saturday 07
10:00 - SYMPOSIUM - BATAVIA (1629): giving voice to the voiceless Website | More Information
When the Dutch East India vessel Batavia was wrecked on Morning Reef in the Abrolhos Islands in June 1629, none of the more than 300 people on board could have imagined the enduring historical impact of this maritime disaster and its bloody aftermath. Those events have inspired a multitude of books, several documentaries for television and radio, a musical, an opera, and numerous art works and exhibitions.

This free public symposium is being held in conjunction with the Lawrence Wilson Art Gallery exhibition BATAVIA (1629): giving voice to the voiceless. Co-hosted by the UWA Cultural Precinct and the Institute of Advanced Studies, this is an opportunity to hear from artists whose work is displayed in the exhibition and from a diverse group of experts who have played a key role in understanding those events of 1629.

Speakers include:

Robert Cleworth (Artist, New South Wales); Alec Coles OBE, CEO WA Museum; Dr Daniel Franklin (The University of Western Australia); Professor Jane Lydon (The University of Western Australia); Professor Alistair Paterson (The University of Western Australia); Corioli Souter (The University of Western Australia; Western Australian Museum); Dr Paul Uhlmann (Artist, Western Australia; Edith Cowan University); Arvi Wattel (The University of Western Australia).

10:00 - EVENT - Symposium - Batavia (1629): Giving Voice to the Voiceless Website | More Information
When the Dutch East India vessel Batavia was wrecked on Morning Reef in the Abrolhos Islands in June 1629, none of the more than 300 people on board could have imagined the enduring historical impact of this maritime disaster and its bloody aftermath. Those events have inspired a multitude of books, several documentaries for television and radio, a musical, an opera, and numerous art works and exhibitions.

This free public symposium is held in conjunction with the exhibition Batavia: Giving voice to the voiceless. Discover more about the enduring historical impact of the maritime disaster of the wrecking of the Dutch East India vessel Batavia in the Abroholos Islands in 1629 through the eyes of artists, historians and archaeologists. It is also an opportunity to hear from artists whose work is displayed in the exhibition.

Co–hosted by the UWA Cultural Precinct and the Institute of Advanced Studies.

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