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Today's date is Thursday, November 26, 2020
Faculty of Science
 July 2018
Monday 16
13:00 - SEMINAR - Seminar : School of Human Sciences Seminar Series - 16 July (Professor Des Richardson) More Information
The iron-regulated metastasis suppressor N-myc downstream-regulated gene 1 (NDRG1) has been shown to inhibit numerous oncogenic signaling pathways in cancer cells. Recent findings have demonstrated that NDRG1 inhibits the ErbB family of receptors, which function as key inducers of carcinogenesis. NDRG1 attenuates ErbB signaling by inhibiting formation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)/human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) and HER2/HER3 heterodimers and by down-regulating EGFR via a mechanism involving its degradation. Understanding the complex interplay between NDRG1, iron, and ErbB signaling is vital for identifying novel, more effective targets for cancer therapy.
Tuesday 17
13:00 - SEMINAR - Seminar : School of Human Sciences Seminar Series - 17 July More Information
Associate Professor Stine Brandt Bering is a researcher within Comparative Pediatrics and Nutrition at University of Copenhagen, Denmark. She graduated as a Master of Science in Chemical Engineering (Biotechnology) from The Technical University of Denmark in 2001, and subsequently pursued her PhD studies in Human Nutrition at University of Copenhagen (2001-2006). She continued as a postdoctoral fellow at University of Copenhagen with a supplemental Marie Curie fellowship at The Institute of Food Research in Norwich, UK. Her research focus is on neonatal nutrition in relation to gastrointestinal and immune development in early life. Methods include in vivo animal models, human studies, in vitro cell models and ex vivo tissue studies to clarify specific intestinal responses and cellular mechanisms. Nutrients of interest are bioactive compounds, pre- and probiotics and human milk oligosaccharides. She is the leader of the cell and analytical laboratory in The Section for Comparative Pediatrics and Nutrition, PI of several grants and research administrator of the NEOMUNE research center.

Assistant Professor Duc Ninh Nguyen currently works at the section for Comparative Pediatrics and Nutrition, University of Copenhagen, Denmark. He graduated as a Master of Science in Food Science and Technology in 2011 and obtained a PhD in Food Science and Nutrition in 2014, both at the University of Copenhagen, Denmark. His research focus is on neonatal nutrition, gastroenterology and infectious diseases in early life. The main research tools include animal models of gut inflammation and perinatal infection (mainly preterm pigs) and in vitro intestinal epithelial cell models, together with analytical techniques related to immune assays, proteomics and protein biochemistry. He is also actively involved in design and planning of clinical trials in preterm infants, data management and biological sample analysis. He is the leader of the Immunology sub-group in the section for Comparative Pediatrics and Nutrition, co-PI and work package leader of several grants including STIMMUNE (Bioactive proteins to protect newborn neonates against perinatal inflammation, funded by Arla Food for Health) and NEOCOL (Colostrum for newborns, funded by Innovation Foundation Denmark).
Thursday 26
12:00 - SEMINAR - Bayliss Seminar Series : Joshua Ramsay - Curtin University More Information
Regulated assembly and horizontal transfer of tripartite mobile DNA elements

13:00 - SEMINAR - Bioengineered skeletal muscle tissues to study regeneration and drug response : School of Human Sciences Seminar Series Website | More Information
Abstract:

Engineering three-dimensional skeletal muscle tissues is motivated by the need for improved physiological systems that would serve for modelling and studying of muscle diseases, pre-clinical drug development, and potential muscle regenerative therapies. In this talk, I will describe first-time engineering of contractile human engineered muscle tissues made of primary myogenic cells derived from muscle biopsies and myogenic progenitors derived from induced pluripotent stem cells by transient overexpression of satellite cell marker Pax7. Resulting engineered microtissues (“myobundles”) exhibit aligned architecture, multinucleated and striated myofibers, and a Pax7+ cell pool. They contract spontaneously and respond to electrical stimuli with robust calcium transients, twitch and tetanic contractions. During culture, myobundles maintain functional acetylcholine receptors and structurally and functionally mature, as evidenced by increased myofiber diameter, improved calcium handling and contractile strength, and enhanced expression of maturation genes. In response to diversely acting drugs, myobundles undergo dose-dependent hypertrophy or toxic myopathy similar to clinical outcomes. When derived using cells from patients with congenital skeletal muscle disease, myobundles exhibit expected pathological phenotype. Upon implantation into immunocompromised mice for 3 weeks, the myobundles progressively vascularize and maintain functionality. I will further show that incorporation of immune system cells into the engineered myobundles enhances their regenerative potential and enables near-complete structural and functional repair after cardiotoxin injury in vitro and hypoxic injury in vivo. Overall, tissue-engineered myobundles provide an enabling platform for predictive drug and toxicology screening and development of novel therapeutics for degenerative muscle disorders.

Speaker:

Dr. Nenad Bursac is a Professor of Biomedical Engineering, Medicine, and Cell Biology at Duke University. As a PhD student in Robert Langer’s group at MIT, he demonstrated the first engineering of functional heart tissues using mammalian cells. As a postdoctoral fellow in Leslie Tung’s group at Johns Hopkins University, he developed novel methods to control architecture and function of cardiomyocyte cultures for studies of cardiac arrhythmias. Currently, Dr. Bursac's research involves development of novel cell, tissue, and genetic engineering therapies for heart and skeletal muscle disease. Examples of this work include engineering of first human contractile skeletal muscle tissues from primary and induced pluripotent stem cells, first fabrication of human cardiac tissue patches with clinically relevant dimensions, and use of engineered prokaryotic sodium channels as a platform for control of tissue excitability. Dr. Bursac has authored more than 90 scientific articles and has mentored more than 30 PhD students and postdoctoral and medical fellows. He co-directs Regeneration Next Initiative at Duke University. He is a recipient of the Stansell Family Distinguished Research Award and Stem Cell Innovation Award. In 2014, Dr. Bursac was the president of the North Carolina Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine Society. Since 2015, Dr. Bursac has been a Fellow of American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering.

 August 2018
Thursday 30
12:00 - SEMINAR - Bayliss Seminar Series : Jie Chen - The mysterious microsporidia More Information

 September 2018
Tuesday 11
18:00 - PUBLIC TALK - Raising the Bar Perth : 10 talks, 10 bars, 1 night only Website | More Information
For the first time in Perth, join ten world-leading UWA researchers as they escape their labs and lecture theatres to bring impactful talks into ten Perth City bars. Raising the Bar Perth is for one night only, so bookings are essential.
Friday 14
12:00 - SEMINAR - Bayliss Seminar : Tyren Dodgen - Waters Australia More Information
Wednesday 19
11:00 - SEMINAR - Bayliss Seminar : Moana Simpson More Information

13:00 - WORKSHOP - GAMSAT Graphs Seminar (UWA) | GradReady : This seminar is dedicated to graph-style questions on the GAMSAT Website | More Information
This seminar will be dedicated to graph-style questions, which have become yet more prominent in recent iterations of the GAMSAT® Exam. The speaker at the session will be an experienced teacher with extensive practice in the interpretation of graphs and diagrams, geometric reasoning, and logical reasoning.

The speaker will guide you through several examples drawn from different Sections of the GAMSAT® Exam, giving you an opportunity to ask detailed questions to consolidate your understanding, in addition to outlining general strategies that can be utilised in approaching this increasingly important category of GAMSAT® Exam questions.

Be sure to save your spot through our EventBrite page:

https://gradready.com.au/posts/gamsat-preparation-courses/free-gamsat-events

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This semester we're also running a GAMSAT® Graphs Seminar - dedicated to graph-style questions, which have become yet more prominent in recent iterations of the GAMSAT® Exam - and a series FREE GAMSAT Tutorials that will focus on an individual section of the GAMSAT.

Visit our FB events page to learn more: https://www.facebook.com/pg/GradReadyGAMSAT/events

For more information on the other seminars and events we’re planning to run throughout the year visit our website here: https://gradready.com.au/posts/gamsat-preparation-courses/free-gamsat-events

If you've got any queries, feel free to send us a message on our Facebook Page!

We look forward to seeing you at our events!

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Our students improved their scores by 25 Percentile Points on average and achieved a Medical School Admission rate of 90%+, 4 years in a row. We are the only provider to achieve statistically significant score improvements for our students.

To learn more visit our website: https://gradready.com.au/posts/gamsat-preparation-courses/free-gamsat-events

Enrol in groups of 3 or more and receive up to 15% off. 90%+ Medical School Admissions Rate - 8 years+ Trusted Experience - 6000+ Students
Friday 28
11:00 - EVENT - Measuring Your Research Performance (STEM) : This session will be useful for researchers who are applying for grants, tenure or promotion; or who generally wish to monitor their research performance. Website | More Information
This session will be useful for researchers who are applying for grants, tenure or promotion; or who generally wish to monitor their research performance. It will cover finding:

Evidence of quality for journals in which you have published – journal rankings, inclusion on esteemed journals lists. Citation numbers for individual publications (metrics from Google Scholar, Web of Science and Scopus). Benchmarking of articles in publications that are indexed by Web of Science – Incites. Your h-index – a measure of the productivity and citation impact of your published body of work (from Google Scholar, Web of Science and Scopus). Australian and international Library holdings for books or book chapters. Altmetrics (alternative metrics) for individual publications, such as downloads numbers, social media mentions. Media mentions. The presenter will be available for 15 minutes after the seminar for questions.

 October 2018
Friday 05
12:00 - EVENT - Seminar Series : Thermodynamic modeling of ion transport More Information
Monday 08
13:00 - WORKSHOP - Free Gamsat Biology Tutorial (UWA) | GradReady : This seminar is dedicated to covering the Biology section on the GAMSAT Website | More Information
Don’t know where to start with your GAMSAT® Preparation? Struggling with the Biology section?

GradReady is running a FREE GAMSAT Tutorial that will give you the chance to focus on the Biology section of the GAMSAT Exam in an individual and dedicated 1-hour class.

Spots are limited to the first 30 students so make sure you don't miss out!

GradReady is an education technology company aimed at making learning more effective and engaging. GradReady has helped over 6000 students prepare for the GAMSAT® exam since 2010 and our students have improved by an average of 25 percentile points and 90%+ have achieved medical school admissions over the last 4 years.

To learn more about GradReady, click here: https://gradready.com.au/

At these tutorials we create an interactive learning environment that mimics the way we deliver our actual courses to provide students with an invaluable learning experience and real engagement with our expert tutors - All for Free!

https://gradready.com.au/posts/gamsat-preparation-courses/free-gamsat-events

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Program:

- High Level Overview of the GAMSAT® Exam and Detailed Breakdown of Biology Area - Biology-Specific Study Techniques: Strategy, Planning and Free Resources - Sample MCQs: Group Activity and Review - More MCQs Added for Semester 2 - Q&A with GAMSAT® Biology Tutor

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In addition to our regular tutorials, we’re also running two larger seminars:

- GAMSAT Graphs Seminar

Visit our FB events for more details: https://www.facebook.com/pg/GradReadyGAMSAT/events

For more information on the other seminars and events we’re planning to run throughout the year visit our website here: https://gradready.com.au/posts/gamsat-preparation-courses/free-gamsat-events

We look forward to seeing you at our events!

---

Our students improved their scores by 25 Percentile Points on average, 4 years in a row. We are the only provider to achieve statistically significant score improvements for our students.

To learn more: https://gradready.com.au/posts/gamsat-preparation-courses/free-gamsat-events

90%+ Medical School Admissions Rate - 8 years+ Trusted Experience - 6000+ Students

13:00 - SEMINAR - Sleep/wakefulness control using optogenetics : School of Human Sciences Special Seminar by Raine Visiting Professor More Information
The Speaker Professor Akihiro Yamanaka leads a team of researchers at the Department of Neuroscience II, Research Institute of Environmental Medicine (RIEM) at Nagoya University, Japan. Professor Yamanaka is a pharmacologist by training but early in his career he developed a strong interest in neuroscience. He has been at the forefront of research on orexin/hypocretin neurons since their discovery in 1998. Using slice patch clamp recording of orexin neurons, and later using optogenetics to control the activity of orexin neurons and associated neurotransmitter pathways, he has unravelled the nature and functionality of the neural network that is involved in the regulation of sleep/wakefulness.

He has published more than 90 papers since obtaining his PhD in 2000, with more than 40% of his papers in high impact journals such as Nature, Science, and Neuron. He has extensively published about the applications and developments of optogenetics technology in the neurosciences.

Optogenetics enables neuroscientists to manipulate the activity of neurons using light. What is the mechanism of optogenetics? What can a neuroscientist reveal using optogenetics? In this seminar, Professor Yamanaka will discuss the impact of optogenetics on neuroscience research, taking as an example the application to neural circuits that regulate animal behaviour.

Abstract: Sleep/wakefulness is a very familiar and interesting physiological phenomenon. However, little is known about its neural regulatory mechanisms, since it has been difficult to manipulate the activity of neurons in vivo. With the development of optogenetics in 2005, it has become possible to control the activity of targeted neurons in vivo. To do this, light activated proteins, such as channelrhodopsin (ChR), can be expressed in the targeted neurons and the delivery of light at an appropriate wavelength then activates those ChR expressing neurons. In this lecture, Prof Yamanaka will discuss the impact of optogenetics on neuroscience research, taking as an example the application to neural circuits that regulate sleep and wakefulness.
Thursday 11
16:00 - SEMINAR - Mathematics and Statistics colloquium : Interface dynamics: new mechanisms of stabilization and destabilization and structure of flow fields More Information
Interfacial mixing and transport are non-equilibrium processes coupling kinetic to macroscopic scales. They occur in fluids, plasmas and materials, over celestial events to atoms. Grasping their fundamentals can advance a broad range of disciplines in science, mathematics, and engineering. This work focuses on the long- standing classical problem of stability of a phase boundary - a fluid interface that has a mass flow across it. We briefly review the recent advances and challenges in theoretical and experimental studies, present our general theoretical framework directly linking microscopic interfacial transport to macroscopic flow fields, for both inertial and accelerated dynamics, discover new mechanisms of the interface stabilization and destabilization, and chart perspectives for future research.
Saturday 13
10:00 - CONFERENCE - TEDxUWA 2018: Turning Points : TEDxUWA returns for its third annual conference dedicated to ideas worth spreading! Website | More Information
WHAT'S YOUR TURNING POINT?

WELCOME TO TEDxUWA 2018 The theme for this year is Turning Points. With an amazing line up of 10 inspirational speakers from the UWA community and beyond, get ready for a day of excitement, entertainment and enlightenment.

||Ticket Prices and Release Dates||

***FIRST RELEASE 03/09/18 - 16/09/18*** Standard $40 | Concession $30 | TEDxUWA Members $25

***SECOND RELEASE 17/09/18 - 13/10/18*** Standard $45 | Concession $35 | TEDxUWA Members $30

***Door Sales $50***

Registration opens at 9AM, for a 10AM start.

Please note morning and afternoon tea & coffee will be provided. There will be food trucks available outside for lunch.

About TED:

TED is a nonprofit devoted to spreading ideas, usually in the form of short, powerful talks (18 minutes or less). TED began in 1984 as a conference where Technology, Entertainment and Design converged, and today covers almost all topics — from science to business to global issues — in more than 100 languages.

About TEDx:

x = independently organized event In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TED Talks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized.

About TEDxUWA:

The TEDxUWA movement aims to bring the spirit of TED to the University of Western Australia campus community by organising events that are focused on the power of ideas to change. The major TEDxUWA conference is held annually and is a full-day, multidisciplinary event with a simillar structure to the TED conference. We also host smaller scaled gatherings, called TEDxUWASalons throughout the year focusing on a singular theme, allowing attendees to have a more intimate outlook on ideas-sharing.

#tedxuwa2018 #turningpoints
Tuesday 16
13:00 - SEMINAR - To mend a broken heart, thou shalt learn from the ladies : School of Human Sciences Seminar Series More Information
Dr. Yun Wah Lam received his PhD training in the lab of Dr. Davina Opstelten at the University of Hong Kong. After receiving his PhD in 1996, he joined the group of Prof. Angus Lamond in Dundee, Scotland, where he developed an interest in the relationship of the architecture of mammalian cell nucleus and the regulation of gene expression. In 2007, he joined the Department of Biology and Chemistry, City University of Hong Kong. His team uses quantitative mass spectrometry to tackle a variety of biological projects, ranging from environmental sciences to regenerative medicine.

Abstract: Zebrafish is one of the most well-established animal models for heart regeneration. Here, we report the sexual dimorphism of zebrafish heart regeneration, with females regenerating their hearts faster than males. Estradiol treatment of males accelerated cardiac regeneration, while tamoxifen treatment of females reduced it. This sexual dimorphism was abolished by oxygen, suggesting the involvement of the Hypoxia-inducible factor 1a (HIF1a) pathway. Remarkably, cardiac damages induced plasma estrogen levels and the expression of estrogen receptor genes in zebrafish, leading to the feminisation of males, as evidenced by the detection of female-specific plasma proteins, including vitellogenins, in males during heart regeneration. Oxygen stimulated estrogen receptor expression in regenerating hearts in males, suggesting an interplay between the estrogen- and HIF1a-related mechanisms in heart regeneration. We show that vitellogenins were expressed in the liver and accumulated in damaged male hearts; but not in other wounds or in regenerating fins. Taken together, our data indicate that in zebrafish females are more efficient in mending broken hearts, and males are spontaneously feminised during heart regeneration. This unexpected phenomenon elucidates a previously unknown aspect of zebrafish tissue regeneration.
Friday 19
12:00 - SEMINAR - Bayliss Seminar series : Carl Mousley-Friday 19 October 2018 More Information
Carl Mousley Faculty of Health Sciences, Curtin University

Closing the gate on the ER translocon
Saturday 20
9:30 - OPEN DAY - Lions Eye Institute Open Day is free on Saturday 20 Oct 9:30-12:30 : Open Day this Saturday 20 October 2018 - Free event Website | More Information
This year’s Open Day will feature interactive displays from a number of LEI research groups showcasing the latest in cutting edge eye science with a focus on eye genetics, DNA testing, stem cell technology, gene therapy and clinical trials. Displays on offer: • Experience being inside the eye using virtual reality technology. • Learn how the LEI uses skin samples to grow eye cells in petri dishes. • Vision impairment glasses will show you how different eye diseases affect eyesight. • Chat with LEI Managing Director Professor David Mackey. • Games prizes and raffles. • Special offers on eye tests with the Lions Optics team. • Learn about the ATOM study and how we’re tackling short-sightedness is children. • Get a close look at a real eyeball. • Make damper with our Outback Vision team and learn more about their work in remote WA. • Learn more about our ‘Surfer’s eye’ clinical trial and many more. The Open Day is free and all are welcome.

16:30 - FESTIVAL - Pingelly Astrofest : Pingelly Astrofest is a free family-friendly event to celebrate astronomy, science and the Western Australian night sky, and is hosted by UWA Farm Ridgefield and the International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research (ICRAR). Website | More Information
UWA Farm Ridgefield and the International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research (ICRAR) are hosting a community based festival event to celebrate astronomy and Australian science on Saturday, 20 October 2018!

The event will feature fun and engaging activities in a beautiful rural setting, approximately 2 hours from Perth. Attendees will be able to interact and engage with astronomy experts, enjoy activities run by Scitech, see fabulous astrophotography and learn about some of the local history of astronomy in the Pingelly region.

Don't forget to register and attend the event to go into the draw to win your very own telescope!: ioa.uwa.edu.au/events/register

Bus transport is available and will be leaving UWA campus at 2pm on Saturday 20 October, 2018 and will return to the UWA campus at approximately midnight. Bus charges are $27 per adult and $15.00 for children under 12 and concession holders. Please purchase your ticket through Eventbrite: https://ow.ly/gtJ730lRv64

If you have any questions, please email Debra Mullan ([email protected]) or call 08 6488 1539
Monday 22
13:00 - SEMINAR - Busting myths about how mammals cope with heat – insights from free-living mammals : School of Human Sciences Special Seminar More Information
Speaker: Andrea Fuller is a Professor in the School of Physiology and Director of the Brain Function Research Group at the University of the Witwatersrand, South Africa. Her primary research focus is in the areas of thermal and conservation physiology, with an emphasis on understanding the physiological plasticity available to mammals to cope with climate change, and methods to improve the physiological welfare of mammals during game management practices. She has published more than 100 peer-reviewed articles, hosted seven postdoctoral fellows, and supervised 10 Doctoral and 13 Masters students to completion. She has served as chair of the Thermal Physiology Commission of the International Union of Physiological Sciences, and is an editorial board member of the journals Conservation Physiology; Temperature; and Koedoe - African Protected Area Conservation and Science.

Abstract: Fundamental to predicting the ecological consequences of climate change is understanding the physiological mechanisms available to mammals to cope with changing environments. Much of what we know about how mammals respond to heat is based on studies of mammals in the laboratory setting. Although this approach identifies what an animal can achieve physiologically, it does not reveal what an animal actually will do in its natural environment, where it is subjected to a complex array of stressors. Indeed, data obtained from free-living mammals reveal that we need to monitor the responses of mammals in their natural habitats if we wish to understand how they will prioritise competing homeostatic systems in changing environments, and the consequences of that prioritisation for their fitness.

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