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Today's date is Tuesday, October 20, 2020
Faculty of Science
 June 2018
Wednesday 06
13:00 - EVENT - Postgraduate Showcase: Frontiers in Agriculture : All are welcome to listen to eight of UWA's best PhD Candidates studying agriculture and related areas present their research. Afternoon tea and refreshments provided. Website | More Information
Please join us at this year’s Postgraduate Showcase: Frontiers in Agriculture, where some of UWA’s top postgraduate students undertaking research in agriculture and related areas will present their findings.

For more information, download the flyer https://www.ioa.uwa.edu.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0005/3103493/PG-Showcase-Flyer-6-June-2018_FINAL.pdf

Register online at www.ioa.uwa.edu.au/events/register by Friday, 1 June 2018.
Thursday 07
12:00 - EVENT - Bayliss Seminar Series : Ethan D. Goddard-Borger - The Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research, Victoria More Information
Insights into the roles of tryptophan C-mannosylation

18:00 - PUBLIC TALK - Towards Zero Hunger (SDG2) in Africa Website | More Information
A public lecture by Frans Swanepoel, Research Professor, Centre for Advancement of Scholarship, University of Pretoria, South Africa and 2018 UWA Institute of Advanced Studies Visiting Fellow.

Currently there are 1.3 billion people in Africa; more than five times the population in 1950. By 2050, Africa’s population will double to 2.6 billion, eventually reaching 4.2 billion by the end of the century – just about the entire world population in 1977. Africa is also the world’s most food insecure continent, with relatively low levels of agricultural productivity, low rural incomes, high rates of malnutrition, and a significantly worsening food trade balance. Ironically Africa has sufficient land, water and human resources to be a substantial contributor to the world’s food balance sheet, and to contribute to the growing global demand for both food staples and higher value added food, as well as to energy markets. Agriculture and the food sector also present significant opportunity for employment and wealth creation. This critical role of agriculture in fostering sustained competitiveness and profitability in the sector, in the face of a world economy that is rapidly transformed into a knowledge and network economy is acknowledged both within the scientific community and in Governments at large. Without question, agriculture and capacity strengthening are now back on the development agenda as Africa refocuses towards achieving the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). African agriculture has a number of major strengths, but also faces a significant number of challenges, a set of unique opportunities. Africa has now entered a development stage where some analysts are taking a more positive outlook and narrative as opposed to the traditional ‘Afro-pessimism’ of the last five decades. A new school of thought is emerging, one that recognises that Africa is in a better position to help itself be food secure moving forward – agriculture has started growing, albeit slowly but sustainably over the last decade. However, a number of interesting trends distinguish the economic growth of Africa from other continents. The dominant growth detected here is by small intermediary groups who are responding to rapid urbanisation and the growing ‘middle-class’. Strategies to support growth in sustainable agriculture should thus be responsive to these trends in order to vastly improve food security on the African continent.
Friday 15
11:00 - WORKSHOP - Grey literature searching for Systematic Reviews Website | More Information
Searching the grey literature is an essential step in undertaking a systematic review - but what is grey literature, why is it so important and how do you find it? This seminar will provide you with some key tools and tips to assist you. Intended for researchers planning to undertake a systematic review. Registration required, please follow the link to register.
Monday 25
9:00 - SYMPOSIUM - CCTRM Symposium : Hottest topics in cell therapy and regenerative medicine More Information
The Centre for Cell Therapy and Regenerative Medicine is holding a mid-Winter Symposium around the visit by a delegation of stem cell scientists from Helmholtz Centre Munich.

The Helmholtz presentations will be headlined by Micha Drukker, leader of the Pluripotent Stem Cell Differentiation Laboratory, who will give the Perkins/CCTRM lunchtime seminar. He will address the challenges and recent breakthroughs on producing clinical grade pluripotent cells.

Lunch will be followed by an early career researchers session, with ECR from Helmholtz mixed with those from UWA to present on the hottest topics in cell therapy and regenerative medicine.

Talks for the remainder of the Symposium sessions will come from the full spectrum of CCTRM participants presenting highlights from their latest research.

12:00 - SEMINAR - Bayliss Seminar Series : Prof Steve Armes - Polymerisation-induced self-assembly More Information

13:00 - WORKSHOP - Research Data Storage and Sharing Website | More Information
Do you want to ensure that your research data is secure, accessible and reusable into the future? Find out how you can apply research data management best practice in all phases of the research lifecycle to ensure this happens. UWA offers a suite of services which aim to help researchers meet funder and publisher requirements in terms of data storage and access.

Bring your questions, the presenters will be available for 15 minutes after the workshop for individual consultations.
Tuesday 26
13:00 - SEMINAR - Seminar : Paraspeckles in developmental progenitors More Information
Micha Drukker performed his PhD at The Hebrew University in Israel, and post doctoral studies at Stanford University Medical School, where he gained knowledge of stem cell regulation. Since 2012 he has been heading the research group “Human Pluripotent Stem Cell Differentiation” and the core facility “Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells” at the Institute of Stem Cell Research at Helmholtz Zentrum München in Germany. Dr Drukker’s currently studies the mechanisms that regulate early differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells, and the origin of developmental diseases. He is also leading a project for manufacturing and banking immune optimized human induced pluripotent stem cell lines as a starting point for differentiating into tissue regenerating cells, including beta cells for therapy of diabetes.
Thursday 28
12:00 - SEMINAR - Bayliss Seminar Series : Dr Brendan Wilkinson - Lessons from Nature: New Frontiers in Biomimetic Self-assembly More Information

17:00 - OPEN DAY - Telethon Kids Institute (Centre for Child Health Research) - Prospective Student Evening : An information evening for students interested in completing HDR or Honours courses at the Telethon Kids Institute Website | More Information
Telethon Kids Institute (UWA's Centre for Child Health Research) invites all prospective Honours, M.D., and higher degree by research students to join us for the evening to learn more about becoming a student with us!

Our supervisors will be speaking to students about their student projects and research areas. You will get to learn more about what we do, our current research projects, and our facilities. You will also get a chance to meet current students and learn more about our student programs, scholarships and support services.

When: Thursday 28th June, 5:00 – 6:30pm

Where: Telethon Kids Institute; 100 Roberts Rd, Subiaco WA 6008

RSVP: ProspectiveStudentEvening2018.splashthat.com

 July 2018
Tuesday 03
9:00 - COURSE - R Basics Website | More Information
R is a free and extremely powerful language and software environment for statistical computing, data analysis, and graphics. This course is designed for those who have no experience with R, but have a basic understanding of statistics.
Tuesday 10
9:00 - COURSE - ANOVA, linear and logistic regression Website | More Information
This course covers techniques that can be used to analyse data with continuous and categorical variables. The course will begin with simple linear regression and then proceed with approaches that can be used with more than two variables such as multiple regression. ANOVA with interactions and blocking will also be covered. The course will end with techniques that address the analysis of binary or ordinal variables.
Thursday 12
10:00 - GUIDED TOUR - Plant the Seed of Knowledge Tour (for ages 8+) : This walking tour is designed for school children (ages 8+) and their families Website | More Information
Hosted by UWA Friends of the Grounds, this walking tour is designed for school children (ages 8+) and their families and will showcase just a small example of what the University has to offer.

Meet our Senior Deputy Vice-Chancellor, Professor Simon Biggs; be amazed at the history of Winthrop Hall; touch a meteorite, have a tour of the Geology museum, purchase rocks that are millions of years old, tour the newly-refurbished Reid Library; hug a tree that is more than 660 years old; see a fascinating science experiment and a host of other extras.

The tour starts under the Great Gate, Winthrop Hall.

16:30 - BOOK LAUNCH - Invitation to The Natural World of the Kimberley book launch : The Natural World of the Kimberley provides an unprecedented view of the Kimberley flora, fauna and landscapes, and the conservation efforts underway to preserve them. Website | More Information
The Western Australian Marine Science Institution is proud to support the launch of the Kimberley Society’s latest publication, The Natural World of the Kimberley.

The publication is the culmination of research results presented at the 2017 Kimberley Symposium including chapters on the WAMSI Kimberley Marine Research Program as well as land-based research conducted across Western Australia’s universities and state government authorities.
Friday 13
11:00 - UWA Research Event - Research Impact Series : Discover how our world-leading researchers are tackling global, national and regional issues to make the world a better place. Website | More Information
Research Impact Series Events:

Cosmos: Journey Through the Universe Thursday. 9 August, 18 October and 8 November 2018

Germaine Greer On Rape: Monday 3 September 2018

Raising the Bar Perth: 10 bars, 10 topics, 1 night only. Tuesday 11 September 2018

Achieving your Research Outcomes: Wednesday 17 - Thursday 18 October 2018
Monday 16
13:00 - SEMINAR - Seminar : School of Human Sciences Seminar Series - 16 July (Professor Des Richardson) More Information
The iron-regulated metastasis suppressor N-myc downstream-regulated gene 1 (NDRG1) has been shown to inhibit numerous oncogenic signaling pathways in cancer cells. Recent findings have demonstrated that NDRG1 inhibits the ErbB family of receptors, which function as key inducers of carcinogenesis. NDRG1 attenuates ErbB signaling by inhibiting formation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)/human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) and HER2/HER3 heterodimers and by down-regulating EGFR via a mechanism involving its degradation. Understanding the complex interplay between NDRG1, iron, and ErbB signaling is vital for identifying novel, more effective targets for cancer therapy.
Tuesday 17
13:00 - SEMINAR - Seminar : School of Human Sciences Seminar Series - 17 July More Information
Associate Professor Stine Brandt Bering is a researcher within Comparative Pediatrics and Nutrition at University of Copenhagen, Denmark. She graduated as a Master of Science in Chemical Engineering (Biotechnology) from The Technical University of Denmark in 2001, and subsequently pursued her PhD studies in Human Nutrition at University of Copenhagen (2001-2006). She continued as a postdoctoral fellow at University of Copenhagen with a supplemental Marie Curie fellowship at The Institute of Food Research in Norwich, UK. Her research focus is on neonatal nutrition in relation to gastrointestinal and immune development in early life. Methods include in vivo animal models, human studies, in vitro cell models and ex vivo tissue studies to clarify specific intestinal responses and cellular mechanisms. Nutrients of interest are bioactive compounds, pre- and probiotics and human milk oligosaccharides. She is the leader of the cell and analytical laboratory in The Section for Comparative Pediatrics and Nutrition, PI of several grants and research administrator of the NEOMUNE research center.

Assistant Professor Duc Ninh Nguyen currently works at the section for Comparative Pediatrics and Nutrition, University of Copenhagen, Denmark. He graduated as a Master of Science in Food Science and Technology in 2011 and obtained a PhD in Food Science and Nutrition in 2014, both at the University of Copenhagen, Denmark. His research focus is on neonatal nutrition, gastroenterology and infectious diseases in early life. The main research tools include animal models of gut inflammation and perinatal infection (mainly preterm pigs) and in vitro intestinal epithelial cell models, together with analytical techniques related to immune assays, proteomics and protein biochemistry. He is also actively involved in design and planning of clinical trials in preterm infants, data management and biological sample analysis. He is the leader of the Immunology sub-group in the section for Comparative Pediatrics and Nutrition, co-PI and work package leader of several grants including STIMMUNE (Bioactive proteins to protect newborn neonates against perinatal inflammation, funded by Arla Food for Health) and NEOCOL (Colostrum for newborns, funded by Innovation Foundation Denmark).
Thursday 26
12:00 - SEMINAR - Bayliss Seminar Series : Joshua Ramsay - Curtin University More Information
Regulated assembly and horizontal transfer of tripartite mobile DNA elements

13:00 - SEMINAR - Bioengineered skeletal muscle tissues to study regeneration and drug response : School of Human Sciences Seminar Series Website | More Information
Abstract:

Engineering three-dimensional skeletal muscle tissues is motivated by the need for improved physiological systems that would serve for modelling and studying of muscle diseases, pre-clinical drug development, and potential muscle regenerative therapies. In this talk, I will describe first-time engineering of contractile human engineered muscle tissues made of primary myogenic cells derived from muscle biopsies and myogenic progenitors derived from induced pluripotent stem cells by transient overexpression of satellite cell marker Pax7. Resulting engineered microtissues (“myobundles”) exhibit aligned architecture, multinucleated and striated myofibers, and a Pax7+ cell pool. They contract spontaneously and respond to electrical stimuli with robust calcium transients, twitch and tetanic contractions. During culture, myobundles maintain functional acetylcholine receptors and structurally and functionally mature, as evidenced by increased myofiber diameter, improved calcium handling and contractile strength, and enhanced expression of maturation genes. In response to diversely acting drugs, myobundles undergo dose-dependent hypertrophy or toxic myopathy similar to clinical outcomes. When derived using cells from patients with congenital skeletal muscle disease, myobundles exhibit expected pathological phenotype. Upon implantation into immunocompromised mice for 3 weeks, the myobundles progressively vascularize and maintain functionality. I will further show that incorporation of immune system cells into the engineered myobundles enhances their regenerative potential and enables near-complete structural and functional repair after cardiotoxin injury in vitro and hypoxic injury in vivo. Overall, tissue-engineered myobundles provide an enabling platform for predictive drug and toxicology screening and development of novel therapeutics for degenerative muscle disorders.

Speaker:

Dr. Nenad Bursac is a Professor of Biomedical Engineering, Medicine, and Cell Biology at Duke University. As a PhD student in Robert Langer’s group at MIT, he demonstrated the first engineering of functional heart tissues using mammalian cells. As a postdoctoral fellow in Leslie Tung’s group at Johns Hopkins University, he developed novel methods to control architecture and function of cardiomyocyte cultures for studies of cardiac arrhythmias. Currently, Dr. Bursac's research involves development of novel cell, tissue, and genetic engineering therapies for heart and skeletal muscle disease. Examples of this work include engineering of first human contractile skeletal muscle tissues from primary and induced pluripotent stem cells, first fabrication of human cardiac tissue patches with clinically relevant dimensions, and use of engineered prokaryotic sodium channels as a platform for control of tissue excitability. Dr. Bursac has authored more than 90 scientific articles and has mentored more than 30 PhD students and postdoctoral and medical fellows. He co-directs Regeneration Next Initiative at Duke University. He is a recipient of the Stansell Family Distinguished Research Award and Stem Cell Innovation Award. In 2014, Dr. Bursac was the president of the North Carolina Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine Society. Since 2015, Dr. Bursac has been a Fellow of American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering.

 August 2018
Thursday 30
12:00 - SEMINAR - Bayliss Seminar Series : Jie Chen - The mysterious microsporidia More Information

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