UWA Logo What's On at UWA
   UWA HomeProspective Students  | Current Students  | Staff  | Alumni  | Visitors  | About  |     Search UWA    for      
 

What's On at UWA

* Login to add events... *
Today's date is Tuesday, August 04, 2020
Faculty of Education
 October 2013
Wednesday 09
18:00 - COURSE - Quit Smoking Successfully! : Smoking cessation treatment program More Information
The Robin Winkler Clinic at The University of Western Australia will be conducting a SMOKING CESSATION treatment program commencing on Wednesday 9th October 2013. The group will meet for two hours each week for ten sessions, with an initial assessment session before the group commences and a follow-up session one month after completion.

The Smoking Cessation treatment program combines nicotine replacement therapy with cognitive-behavioural therapy to help people beat the chemical addiction, as well as the addiction to the habit of smoking itself. The majority of people who complete this science-informed group program become non-smokers and are still smoke-free one month after the group has ended.

The group sessions will be held on Wednesday evenings at 6pm-8pm. The fee is $30 per session for a total of $300 (or $225 if paid in total in the first week; i.e. a 25% saving). The initial assessment and follow-up session will also cost $30 each.

If you would like to reserve a place in the next smoking cessation group, or would like more information, please contact the Robin Winkler Clinic on 6488 2644 or [email protected]
Monday 14
13:00 - WORKSHOP - CAREERS CENTRE – Cover Letters - Top 10 Tips & Writing Lab- Monday 14 October 2013 : Learn how to prepare an effective cover letter Website | More Information
A cover letter is usually the first part of the application process that an employer reads. It is a one page document highlighting how you would be perfect for the position. Writing a high impact cover letter encourages the employer to turn the page and read your resume.
Tuesday 15
13:00 - EVENT - When to Learn and When to Perform : What factors influence individuals’ decisions regarding the allocation of resources to developing skills vs. exploiting existing skills. More Information
ABSTRACT: Two critical and interrelated means of success in the workplace are maximizing one’s current performance by exploiting existing skills, and improving one’s future performance by developing ones skills. In the short-run, trade-offs often exist between learning and performance; time spent learning is often time that could instead be spent performing.

13:00 - Colloquium - When to learn and when to perform? : Colloquium More Information
Aaron Schmidt is a Marvin D. Dunnette Professor of Industrial/Organizational Psychology at the University of Minnesota, Twin Cities. He received his Ph.D. in I/O Psychology from Michigan State University in 2003. Prior to joining the faculty at UMN in 2009, he was an assistant professor of I/O Psychology at The University of Akron. His research focuses on various aspects of work motivation, particularly the self-regulation of time and effort.

ABSTRACT: Two critical and interrelated means of success in the workplace are maximizing one’s current performance by exploiting existing skills, and improving one’s future performance by developing ones skills. In the short-run, trade-offs often exist between learning and performance; time spent learning is often time that could instead be spent performing. However, very little is known about when and why individuals forego short-term performance to engage in learning behavior or vice versa. The primary goal of this research is to understand what factors influence individuals’ decisions regarding the allocation of resources to developing skills vs. exploiting existing skills. This presentation will describe a theoretical account of how individuals manage such trade-offs, as well as empirical research evaluating key aspects of the proposed model.
Thursday 17
12:00 - EVENT - Accomplished Education Researcher Seminar : W/Prof Helen Wildy: A pragmatic researcher: My patchwork of practices, purposes and publications Website | More Information
As researchers in a research-intensive university, we are encouraged to build a coherent research agenda. As research leaders, we encourage our colleagues to articulate a plan and to build a research strategy with international collaborations and ISI targets. Collectively we monitor our outputs and we are monitored for our impact. In this seminar I describe the range of research activities in which I have engaged since taking my current role at UWA. Mostly my focus is school leadership, both its development and its role in driving student learning. However, in reflecting on five years of research, I see that my progress is not always linear, nor is the agenda completely coherent. The research includes long term international partners, such as Durham University, new international collaborations in China and Iceland, complex collaborations across the country including Mission Australia and Ted Noff’s Foundation, and small activities involving one other researcher, for example, my collaborations with novice researchers in Iceland and Bhutan. Some are funded through competitive grants and industry support, and others are entirely unfunded. I have undertaken research with sophisticated software, such as PIPS, InCAS, NuLit, Appraise and EYLND, longitudinal surveys, such as the Perspectives of Leadership Development, as well as narrative inquiry. As I reflect on the purposes of this patchwork of research I begin to understand that there are many worthwhile goals apart from adding to the body of useful knowledge. My talk is framed around a set of purposes – intended and unintended – and its consequences for publications.
Monday 21
12:00 - WORKSHOP - CAREERS CENTRE – Interview Tools & Techniques - Monday 21 October 2013 : Learn how to win that job! Website | More Information
A successful interview can win you the job. This workshop will provide you with techniques that will maximise your chances of being selected. We’ll give you hints and tips on how to anticipate interview questions and prepare effectively.
Friday 25
13:00 - TALK - Documenting and Presenting Performance : Cultural Knowledge and Experience Embodied in Musical Recordings, Objects and Images More Information
Jennifer Post, an ethnomusicologist, is currently an Honorary Senior Research Fellow working with the John Blacking Collection at the Callaway Centre, UWA.

In this talk, Jennifer will explore the way saved sounds, objects and images hold stories and conjure memories of music-making through their social and ecological history.

Jennifer will share musical stories and examples from exhibitions incorporating music from Western Arnhem Land and Southern Eastern Africa.

PUBLIC PROGRAM: This FREE event is part of the Berndt Museum public program accompanying the current exhibition (Little Painting, Big Stories) at the Lawrence Wilson Art Gallery. For similar events visit the website: https://www.lwgallery.uwa.edu.au/publicprogram

PARTNERSHIPS: The Campus Partner for this exhibition is the Graduate School of Education
Tuesday 29
13:00 - Colloquium - The emotional face : Colloquium More Information
I came to Australia in 1990 to work with Professor D. Siddle in the School of Psychology, University of Queensland on a postdoctoral research scholarship from the German Research Council. In 1994, I joined the academic staff in the School of Psychology, teaching in the areas of Human Associative Learning, Psychophysiology, and Behavioural Neuroscience. My research, both basic and applied, is concerned with emotion, attention and their interaction. In particular, it is concerned with the processes involved in the acquisition of likes and dislikes and with the manner in which emotionally salient events, such as facial expressions of emotion, are processed. I have published over 100 papers in peer reviewed, internationally recognised Journals and obtained more than $3M in competitive grants. In 2007, I was awarded an Australian Professorial Fellowship funded by the ARC and led a successful bid for an ARC Special Research Initiative in 2013. I am Editor of Biological Psychology and a Fellow of the Academy of the Social Sciences in Australia, the Australian Psychological Society, and the Association for Psychological Science.

ABSTRACT: Facial expressions of emotion are among the most salient social signals used to communicate our current emotional state – they indicate whether it is safe to approach or to stay away. Hence it comes as little surprise that the manner in which facial expressions are processed has garnered considerable research interest in recent years. My interest in face processing was stimulated by reports of delayed extinction of fear conditioned to faces expressing anger and to other facial cues such as ethnicity – and I will present some of our work on the topic. A second line of research, motivated by this work, investigates the manner in which face cues of sex, age or race interact with facial expressions of emotion. This work suggests that processing of emotional expressions is highly flexible and affected by a number of factors, relating to these other cues present on an emotional face or to the context in which the expressions are presented.
Thursday 31
12:00 - WORKSHOP - CAREERS CENTRE – Resume Top 10 Tips + Writing Lab - Thursday 31 October 2013 : Learn how to win that job! Website | More Information
Your resume needs to stand out from the crowd and get you to the interview stage. This workshop provides you with the most important points about developing the content and structuring your document.

 November 2013
Tuesday 12
9:00 - COURSE - R Basics : A Statistics Short Course Website | More Information
R is a free and extremely powerful language and software environment for statistical computing, data analysis, and graphics. The course is designed for those who have no experience with R, but have a basic understanding of statistics. The course will include: Introduction to R: How to install R on your computer; basic R commands, how to use and understand the R help pages. Data: Reading in data and data manipulation; summarising data; basic statistical analysis and fitting linear models. Graphics and output: Basic plotting commands and how to customise your plots; how to export your plots and output in a user-friendly format. Functions: Writing simple functions and flow control structures.
Thursday 14
9:00 - COURSE - Design and Analysis of Experiments : A Short Course using R Website | More Information
The course will cover material ranging from a review of simple one-way ANOVA, to more complex designs and analyses including crossed and nested factors with fixed and random effects.The emphasis throughout will be placed on applications rather than theory. The statistical package R and R Commander will be used and some familiarity with this will be assumed.

12:00 - EVENT - Accomplished Education Researcher Seminar Series : Untying the Gordian Knot of ‘Quality’ and ‘Equity’ in Education for a Global Knowledge Era? Website | More Information
In Australia over the last five years, the Federal Government has thrust a policy couplet of ‘quality’ and ‘equity’ to the forefront of education agendas in both schooling and higher education sectors. This couplet reflects and refracts dominant education discourses around the globe. The Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) has played a significant role in forging these educational priorities for a global knowledge era, and at the same time contributed to heightened competition between countries as they strive for ‘world class’ education systems and institutions. The Australian Federal Government has taken the approach of increasing central control of education in order to enhance both quality and equity, and hence Australia’s competitive positioning in the global arena. But educational quality and equity are amorphous ‘chameleon’ concepts; what are they, how do we measure them and are they comfortable bedfellows? Together, they might be described in terms of a Gordian knot; that is, they have become inextricably interlinked and they potentially create intractable problems. This presentation begins to untie the Gordian knot of quality and equity in education and asks if increasing central government control is the best solution to the policy problem. In so doing, it draws on concepts of ‘policy pandemics’, international ‘policy learning’ and ‘glocalisation’ to emphasise the importance of critical analysis of education trends from global to local levels in an emerging global knowledge society.
Tuesday 19
13:00 - Colloquium - Colloquium : Speaker Perception : Vocal information plays a major role in person perception and social communication More Information
While humans use their voice mainly for communicating information about the world, paralinguistic cues in the voice signal convey rich dynamic information about a speaker´s arousal and emotional state, and extralinguistic cues reflect more stable speaker characteristics including identity, biological sex and social gender, socioeconomic or regional background, and age. Here I discuss how recent methodological progress in voice morphing and voice synthesis has promoted research on current theoretical issues, such as how voices are mentally represented in the human brain. Special attention is dedicated to the distinction between the recognition of familiar and unfamiliar speakers, in everyday situations or in the forensic context, and on the processes and representational changes that accompany the learning of new voices. I describe how specific impairments and individual differences in voice perception could relate to specific brain correlates. Finally, I consider that voices are produced by speakers who are often visible during communication, and present evidence that shows how speaker perception involves dynamic face-voice integration. Overall, the representation of para- and extralinguistic vocal information plays a major role in person perception and social communication, could be neuronally encoded in a prototype-referenced manner, and is subject to flexible adaptive recalibration as a result of specific perceptual experience.

Biography: Stefan Schweinberger is a full professor at the University of Jena in Germany. He is chair for General Psychology and head of the DFG-funded Person Perception Research Unit. Stefan received his Ph.D. and Habilitation from the University of Konstanz and was professor at the University of Glasgow before moving to Jena. His research interests include the cognitive and neural mechanisms underlying person perception, particularly the electrophysiological correlates of face and voice perception.

13:00 - Colloquium - Speaker Perception : Vocal information plays a major role in person perception and social communication More Information
While humans use their voice mainly for communicating information about the world, paralinguistic cues in the voice signal convey rich dynamic information about a speaker´s arousal and emotional state, and extralinguistic cues reflect more stable speaker characteristics including identity, biological sex and social gender, socioeconomic or regional background, and age. Here I discuss how recent methodological progress in voice morphing and voice synthesis has promoted research on current theoretical issues, such as how voices are mentally represented in the human brain. Special attention is dedicated to the distinction between the recognition of familiar and unfamiliar speakers, in everyday situations or in the forensic context, and on the processes and representational changes that accompany the learning of new voices. I describe how specific impairments and individual differences in voice perception could relate to specific brain correlates. Finally, I consider that voices are produced by speakers who are often visible during communication, and present evidence that shows how speaker perception involves dynamic face-voice integration. Overall, the representation of para- and extralinguistic vocal information plays a major role in person perception and social communication, could be neuronally encoded in a prototype-referenced manner, and is subject to flexible adaptive recalibration as a result of specific perceptual experience.

Biography: Stefan Schweinberger is a full professor at the University of Jena in Germany. He is chair for General Psychology and head of the DFG-funded Person Perception Research Unit. Stefan received his Ph.D. and Habilitation from the University of Konstanz and was professor at the University of Glasgow before moving to Jena. His research interests include the cognitive and neural mechanisms underlying person perception, particularly the electrophysiological correlates of face and voice perception.
Monday 25
14:00 - STAFF EVENT - Staff Retreat Website | More Information
This is the sixth year of offering these end of year retreats for staff at UWA. The feedback from previous participants has been unanimously positive. The Retreat provides space to interact with other academic and general staff from across UWA; reconnect with professional ‘passion’; allow inspiration and creativity to surface; restore purposefulness.

The format includes some reflection on poetry (to slow us down into a more reflective space), time alone in silence (walking, resting, reading) and we introduce a process for group listening for anyone who wants support in discerning a question/issue of personal importance (called a ‘Clearness Committee’).

The design of the retreat is based on principles developed by the American Educationalist Parker J Palmer (Let your life speak; The courage to teach; The Heart of Higher Education) and the Centre for Courage and Renewal www.couragerenewal.org

The retreat has an implicit contemplative spirituality focussed on listening, is not religiously specific and does not assume any faith position.

The focus is on creating some good quality space for refreshment, renewal and gaining clarity in personal and professional direction. The retreats and quiet days have support from Teaching and Learning (CATL) and the Research Office. The cost is $260 (no GST) for two full days inclusive of accommodation in single rooms, breakfasts and lunches. Participants share in the provision of evening meals. Staff may wish to apply to their manager or Head of School for funding support as a recognised professional development program.

Previous participants have said….. “This time at the staff retreat has been encouraging for the possibilities of university teaching, lifting us above the limiting busyness of everyday life. Not a ‘how to’ time but a time of deepening inner resources”; “This retreat provided a rare opportunity to quietly reflect on what’s going on for me internally as a teacher, helped by excellent facilitators and a wonderful peaceful location”; “The retreat is expertly and compassionately structured. It provides a rare chance to be brought back to the rawness and passion that inspire great teaching” “I have learned that I am not alone and have community at UWA and the journey of teaching is as special and sacred as I believed it to be”

To obtain a registration form please email [email protected] and if you would like to know more, please contact Michael on Ext 4762.

 December 2013
Friday 06
17:30 - EVENT - Alumni and Staff Twilight Sail : Join us for a Twilight Sail out of Royal Perth Yacht Club. Website | More Information
Enjoy a Twilight Sail on a 36 foot yacht out of Royal Perth Yacht Club. No sailing experience necessary, you can try your hand at crewing under the direction of our qualified skipper or just sit back and enjoy the sail. Alumni and Staff $45. Partners and friends $60. Numbers strictly limited - registration required. BBQ option available after the sail at participants own cost.

 January 2014
Monday 06
9:00 - EVENT - Holiday closure - Faculty open hours : The Faculty of Education officially closes for the festive season at 12 noon on Tuesday 24 December 2013 and will re-open at 8:30am on Monday 6 January 2014 More Information
The Faculty of Education officially closes for the festive season at 12 noon on Tuesday 24 December 2013 and will re-open at 8:30am on Monday 6 January 2014.
Tuesday 21
13:00 - Colloquium - On feeling torn about one’s sexuality: The effects of explicit-implicit sexual orientation ambivalence. : More Information
Three correlational studies investigated implications associated with explicit-implicit sexual orientation ambivalence for information processing and psychological well-being in samples of straight and gay individuals.

Across the studies, 243 straight participants completed explicit and implicit measures of sexual orientation; in one of these studies, 48 gay participants completed the same measures. Within individual studies, participants also completed measures of self-esteem.

When considering the effects of ambivalence between self-reported and indirectly measured sexual orientation (SO), among straight participants explicit-implicit SO ambivalence was positively associated with time spent deliberating questions on sexual preferences; an effect moderated by the direction of ambivalence. In an attempt to explain this effect, in our third study, straight participants read ambivalence-relevant arguments that were either strong or weak in quality. In line with the effect found previously, the amount of explicit-implicit SO ambivalence positively related to post-message cognitive responses after reading strong but not weak arguments. This effect was also found to be moderated by the direction of ambivalence.

For gay participants, individual differences in explicit-implicit SO ambivalence tended to influence time deliberating sexuality. In addition, explicit-implicit ambivalence in sexual orientation attitudes among gay individuals, but not straight individuals, was related to self-esteem in addition to defensive self-esteem.

Our findings demonstrate the information processing consequences of explicit-implicit ambivalence in both straight and gay individuals when considering an attitude object that has considerable personal relevance. Furthermore, our results highlight that explicit-implicit ambivalence in sexual orientation attitudes may be an important antecedence of psychological well-being in gay-individuals.

 February 2014
Monday 17
9:00 - COURSE - Introductory Statistics : A Short Course using SPSS Website | More Information
The aim of this course is to introduce you to basic statistics. It will cover descriptive statistics (means and standard deviations); data exploration; basic categorical data analysis; simple linear regression and basic analysis of variance (ANOVA). The statistical package SPSS will be used to illustrate the ideas demonstrated. The course will be held in a computer laboratory allowing participants to immediately apply the material covered through a series of practical examples.
Tuesday 18
13:00 - Colloquium - Linking CEO Ethical Leadership to Frontline Employee Safety Behaviours More Information
Dr. Tunde Ogunfowora (pronounced Toon-day) is an Assistant Professor of Human Resources and Organizational Dynamics at the Haskayne School of Business, University of Calgary (Canada). His research interests include ethical leadership, abusive supervision, ethical decision making and moral behaviours in the workplace. Dr. Ogunfowora also has an interest in individual differences in morally-oriented traits, values, and cognitions, and their roles in understanding leadership and ethics at work. Co-authors: Dr. Sean Tucker, Faculty of Business Administration, University of Regina, Canada, Dayle Diekrager, Saskatchewan Workers Compensation Board

Each year, thousands of workers are killed on the job. In a growing number of these incidents (Frontline, 2008), the organizational leader is singled out by the media. This paper examines how organizational leaders effectively exercise the duty of care owed to their workers by acting ethically and fostering a culture of safety for reducing work-related injuries and fatalities. Drawing on social learning theory (Bandura, 1973, 1977) and Brown and colleagues’ (2005) ethical leadership construct, we developed and tested a multi-level, trickle-down model linking CEO ethical leadership to frontline employee safety behavior. Specifically, we explored different paths of influence through CEO safety commitment, top management team safety commitment, and frontline supervisory safety commitment. Data were collected from 2,513 frontline employees, 1,452 supervisors, and 206 members of top management teams in 52 organizations. The results showed support for our hypothesized path of influence. Specifically, we found that CEO ethical leadership was positively related to CEO commitment to safety (rated by members of the top management team). Furthermore, CEO commitment to safety was positively related to perceptions of top management team commitment to safety (rated by supervisors). Top management’s commitment to safety was related to frontline employee perceptions of supervisor commitment to safety and, in turn, employee self-reported safety compliance and participation behaviors. The results also showed support for other alternate paths of influence. These findings suggest that ethical organizational leaders can create and foster a strong commitment to safety that permeates through different layers of the organization.

Alternative formats: Default | XML


Top of Page
© 2001-2010  The University of Western Australia
Questions? Mail [email protected]