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Today's date is Monday, September 21, 2020
Centre for Microscopy Characterisation and Analysis
 October 2012
Wednesday 10
12:30 - SEMINAR - OI Seminar Series - Michael Stat More Information
Title: Coral-dinoflagellate symbiosis: evolution, ecology and interaction states

Abstract: Corals form an obligate symbiosis with unicellular photosynthetic dinoflagellates. The diversity of dinoflagellates associated with a host is the result of both evolutionary and ecological influences. While mutualism is the paradigm for coral-dinoflagellate symbiosis, recent evidence shows that not all host-symbiont interactions are equally beneficial. The dynamics of host-symbiont partnerships and the exchange of nutrients that ultimately defines the interaction state of the symbiosis are important factors that contribute to the variability in response of corals to changes in the environment.

Biography: PhD 2006, University of Sydney 2006-2011, Postdoctoral Fellow, Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology, University of Hawaii 2011-current, IOMRC Post-Doctoral Fellow
Thursday 11
13:00 - SEMINAR - Personalised Fluorescent-based Call Analysis from Merck Millipore More Information
CMCA will be hosting a seminar on cell health by Laura Morley from Merck Millipore on Thursday 11th October 2012 from 1-2pm in the Pharmacology Seminar Room (Rm 1.18, 1st floor, M Block, QEII Medical Centre). The seminar will cover topics including viability, cell cycle and apoptosis assays and will introduce the Muse Cell Analyser instrument.

The seminar will be followed by a demonstration of the Muse Cell Analyser at [email protected] in lab 1.42 at 2pm.

16:00 - SEMINAR - Battling bacterial slime: Bacterial persistence mechanisms in chronic and recurrent respiratory infections More Information
Respiratory infections (including ear, nose, throat and lung infections) caused by viruses and bacteria are the most common diseases in children (and adults). Some children are particularly vulnerable to these, developing chronic or recurrent disease and reducing their quality of life, educational outcomes and life expectancy. Ways in which bacteria persist particularly in high-risk populations are poorly understood, as are immune responses to these bacteria. This means that many treatments that target the acute infection have little effect on the chronic or recurrent nature of the diseases. Likewise, preventions are difficult to develop in these vulnerable populations. Our work in the Vaccine Trials Groups and the School of Paediatrics and Child Health focuses on elucidating the role of bacterial biofilms (slime), intracellular infection and host immune response in the development of chronic and recurrent respiratory disease. This presentation will provide an overview of the work we have done and are currently conducting, including both basic research and translational studies.
Wednesday 17
8:30 - EVENT - Australia China Business Council Education Forum 2012 : Chinese Language and Cultural Competency in Schools and Industry - Real Links to a Sustainable Relationship Website | More Information
Whilst trade and enterprise have led Australia's bilateral relations with China, education promotes mutual understanding and long lasting links. This year's forum will focus on developing Chinese language and cultural competency in schools, universities and industry. His Excellency Mr Chen Yuming, Chinese Ambassador to Australia, will provide the keynote address and a panel of business leaders and education representatives will share their experiences.
Friday 26
13:30 - SEMINAR - Oceans Institute Seminar: DR CHRIS BARNES : Understanding earth/ocean processes: new opportunities and technologies through cabled ocean observatories such as NEPTUNE Canada More Information
Abstract: The oceans, bounded by the atmosphere, lithosphere and shore, and covering 70% of the Earth's surface remain a poorly understood component of the Earth system. The changing climate, ocean circulation and chemistry, and depletion of ocean life are increasing at an alarming rate, largely a consequence of human activities. It is imperative to improve public understanding of the changes, consequences and possible future options, and to develop responsive informed public policies. A more quantified scientific database is required not achieved from a century of investigations using buoys, battery operated instruments and ship-based investigations. Advent of the first cabled ocean observatories (e.g. in Canada (NEPTUNE Canada, VENUS), US (OOI, MARS), Japan (DONET), China, Taiwan (MACHO), and European Union (EMSO)) demonstrates challenges, benefits, opportunities and added values for ocean science and commercial applications. Introducing abundant power and high bandwidth communications into diverse ocean environments allows: discrimination between short and long-term events, interactive experiments, real-time data/imagery, and complex multidisciplinary teams interrogating vast interoperable databases over decades. Cabled observatories will transform ocean sciences, with a progressive wiring of the oceans. NEPTUNE Canada completed installation of the subsea infrastructure with over 100 instruments in 2009-10, establishing the world's first regional cabled observatory (northeast Pacific; 800km backbone cable, with five nodes on the coast, continental slope, abyssal plain, and ocean-spreading ridge (100-2660m)). Principal scientific themes are: plate tectonic processes and earthquake-tsunami dynamics; seabed fluid fluxes and gas hydrates; ocean/climate dynamics and biotic effects; deep-sea ecosystem dynamics; engineering/computational research. New knowledge, scientific interpretations, and policy applications are addressing: ocean/climate change, ocean acidification, mitigating natural hazards, non-renewable and renewable natural resources. Socio-economic benefits include: resource/hazard/environmental management, sovereignty, security, transportation, data services, and public policy.

Bio: Chris Barnes is Professor Emeritus in the School of Earth and Ocean Sciences, University of Victoria, and was Director of NEPTUNE Canada (2001-11), the world's first regional cabled ocean observatory network. For the previous decade, he served as Director of both the Centre for Earth and Ocean Research and the School of Earth and Ocean Sciences at the University of Victoria, British Columbia. He has a PhD in Geology from the University of Ottawa. He served as Chair of Earth Sciences both at the University of Waterloo, Ontario (1975-81) and at Memorial University of Newfoundland (1981-87); from 1987-89, he was the Director General of the Sedimentary and Marine Branch of the Geological Survey of Canada. He has served as President of the Geological Association of Canada, the Canadian Geoscience Council, and the Academy of Science of the Royal Society of Canada; and as a commissioner of the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission, as a member of the International Ocean Drilling Program, and on the Science Advisory Committees of EuroSITES, two Spanish ocean observatories, and Canada's Ocean Tracking Network. Fellowship has been awarded in the Royal Society of Canada and the National Academy of Sciences, Cordoba, Argentina. In 1996, he was appointed a Member of the Order of Canada.

 November 2012
Thursday 15
16:00 - SEMINAR - CMCA Seminar Series: Tissue Engineering Approach Towards Scar Reduction Following Burn Injury More Information
Skin is the largest organ of human body. One of the major traumas to the skin is caused by burn injuries. Over a 170,000 people sustain burn injuries each year in Australia alone, of which majority are children. There are a number of possible treatments available clinically and their applicability depends on the extent of the injury. Current treatments are not only expensive but also have major limitations. Extensive work has been carried out to promote the healing process in such injuries however; the ever-arching problem of scar formation post healing is greatly overlooked. In this presentation a new tissue engineering approach will be discussed towards reduced scar wound healing. Different hybrid hydrogels and anti-scarring agents will be demonstrated as potential scaffold systems. Importance of cell motility will be highlighted along with cell proliferation to promote wound healing.
Thursday 22
13:00 - SEMINAR - The CMCA: An old dog with new tricks Website | More Information
The Centre for Microscopy, Characterisation and Analysis (CMCA) provides local researchers and students in biology and biomaterials with access to infrastructure and expertise across imaging (small animal, optical, confocal, 3-D and electron microscopies), analytical (elemental, isotopic, and compound analysis) and flow cytometry (population analysis, phenotyping and sorting) platforms. With the ongoing acquisition of new bio-focussed key facilities and staff, this seminar will aim to present an overview of CMCA’s current capabilities in the biological and biomaterials space. In particular, new capabilities, research applications, plus current and future opportunities for local researchers working with bio-related samples to engage with CMCA will be presented.

 December 2012
Wednesday 12
13:00 - SEMINAR - Australian Synchrotron Imaging and Medical Beamline Information Seminar More Information
The Australian Synchrotron Imaging and Medical Beamline opened for general users on 7 November. The new facility provides researchers with substantially enhanced capabilities over conventional techniques, and beamtime will become increasingly available during 2013.

CMCA is hosting an information seminar presented by Prof Rob Lewis from Monash University which will explain how researchers can utilise the new capabilities of this beamline in their research.

Who should attend? This seminar is for researchers in biomedical and preclinical research. Potential applications include research into cancer, degenerative diseases, regenerative medicine, in-vivo biological and physiological processes as well as material sciences.

The IM beamline offers: -Microbeam radiation therapy, including dosimetry with user-controlled beam energy and spatial distribution -Rapid-acquisition 3D imaging for small samples -Large-scale 2D imaging using different contrast modality (including the superior detail for soft tissue imaging provided by phase contrast).
Thursday 13
16:00 - SEMINAR - CMCA Seminar Series - 13 December @ 4PM: "Non-medical applications of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)" by Michael Johns Website | More Information
This presentation will consider the use of MRI techniques to explore some of the following topics: Flow in porous media (reactors and rock cores), flow in rheometers, fouling of desalination membranes, crystallisation/freezing processes and moisture adsorption by foodstuffs. It will conclude with an overview of robust and mobile MRI (and related technique) capabilities that have been established in the School of Mechanical and Chemical Engineering at UWA

 February 2013
Tuesday 05
17:00 - SEMINAR - WA Flow Group - Inaugural Meeting More Information
Inaugural Meeting of the WA Flow Group. Presentations by: Dr Senta Walton (Pathology & Laboratory Medicine UWA) "CD4+ T cells during MCMV infections'; Fiona Robins (Pathwest, Haematology) "CS&T application settings in diagnostic flow"; Dr Matt Linden (CMCA, UWA) "Flourish for panel design" Please RSVP for catering purposes.
Thursday 21
16:00 - SEMINAR - CMCA Seminar Series: Platelets and disease: Aggregate Knowledge More Information
Matthew earned his PhD in Haematology from UWA in 2003. After postdoctoral and junior faculty research roles in the USA and an academic role at RMIT University's School of Medical Sciences, Matthew has recently returned to UWA to head up the CMCA flow cytometry technique group and continue research on platelets with three related research themes. (1) Overcoming antiplatelet therapy resistance: After seminal work unravelling mechanisms and clinical significance of this phenomenon, Matthew’s research now focuses on performing clinical trials which inform the clinical management of this condition, particularly in the context of type 2 diabetes. (2) Platelet activation, inflammation and atherogenesis: While the role of platelets in the late stage thrombotic complications of heart disease is well characterised, the role of platelet activation in mediating the early inflammatory processes which drive atherogenesis is an emerging area. Matthew has contributed to important discoveries on how platelets mediate inflammation, including GPIIb-IIIa dependent release of CD40L, and cell-cell interactions with inflammatory cells to mediate phenotype. (3) Novel and emerging antiplatelet therapies: Through broad collaborations, Matthew continues to explore potential novel therapeutic targets and characterise antiplatelet potential of novel and emerging strategies. These include targeting platelet adenosine A2 and serotonin 5HT2A receptors, flavonols as selective inhibitors of platelet dense granule exocytosis, and characterisation of the effects of exercise and nutrition on platelet function. All Welcome - Refreshments Available

 March 2013
Thursday 07
11:00 - SEMINAR - Environments for the Characterisation Community – MASSIVE and the Characterisation Virtual Laboratory More Information
The “21st century microscope” will not be a single instrument; rather it will be an orchestration of specialised imaging technologies, data storage facilities, and specialised data processing engines. This presentation will detail two complimentary national projects that are creating an integrated computer environment for researchers who work with imaging data. The Multi-modal Australian ScienceS Imaging and Visualisation Environment (MASSIVE – www.massive.org.au) is a specialised high performance computing (HPC) facility for computational imaging and visualisation. This facility provides the hardware, software and expertise to drive research in the biomedical science, materials research, engineering, and geoscience communities, and it stimulates advanced imaging research that will be exploited across a range of imaging modalities, including synchrotron x-ray and infrared imaging, functional and structural magnetic resonance imaging, x-ray computer tomography (CT), electron microscopy and optical microscopy. MASSIVE is a unique Australian facility with a focus on fast data processing, including processing data “in-experiment”, large-scale visualisation, and analysis of large-cohort and longitudinal research studies. The facility runs an instrument integration project to allow researchers to more easily process instrument data, and provides a remote desktop environment for researchers to use desktop tools to process, analyse and visualize their data. A major undertaking under the MASSIVE program, is the NeCTAR-funded Characterisation Virtual Laboratory (CVL), a project that is developing software infrastructure on the cloud to provide easier access to the tools and techniques that researchers use to process, analyse and visualise imaging data. The CVL is developing three exemplar platforms for multi-modal or large-scale imaging in neuroscience, structural biology, and energy materials. This presentation will describe MASSIVE and the CVL, highlight research that is being conducted using these environments, and describe how researchers can access them. Wojtek James Goscinski is the coordinator of the Multimodal Australian ScienceS Imaging and Visualisation Environment (MASSIVE), a specialist Australian high performance computing facility for imaging and visualization, and he is the External Collaborations Manager at the Monash e-Research Centre a role in which he promotes effective and creative applications of technology in research.
Thursday 21
16:00 - SEMINAR - CMCA Seminar Series: "X-ray phase contrast imaging using conventional sources" by Dr Peter Munro More Information
Image contrast arises in conventional X-ray radiography due the differential absorption of X-rays throughout the sample. Many objects of interest, for example, soft biological tissue, possess weak absorption contrast. Furthermore, by definition, absorption contrast is directly correlated with the radiation dose received by the sample. X-ray phase imaging was developed, initially using synchrotron radiation, in order to overcome the limitation of weak absorption contrast. This technique develops contrast based upon the difference in X-ray propagation times through a sample, which, in general, results in greater contrast than absorption based imaging. In this seminar I will discuss how X-ray phase imaging can be performed using conventional X-ray sources such as those used in clinics and give examples from a variety of fields including mammography, non-destructive testing, security screening and small animal imaging.

 April 2013
Thursday 04
16:00 - SEMINAR - CMCA Seminar Series: Polymer Brushes: “grafting to” tailor surfaces. Talk by Dr Swaminathan Iyer More Information
Polymer brushes (or tethered polymers), first attracted attention in the 1950s when it was found that grafting polymer molecules to colloidal particles was a very effectiver way to prevent flocculation. The repulsive force between brushes arises ultimately from the high osmotic pressure inside the brushes. Subsequently it was found that polymer brushes could be useful in other applications such as new adhesive materials, protein-resistant biosurfaces, surfactants, responsive biointerfaces, controlled drug-delivery/release systems and thin film sensors. In this talk I will introduce the fundamentals of macromolecules tethered to surfaces in the brush regime and the thermodynamic/kinetic constraints associated with grafting polymers. Following this, I will propose the use of poly (glycidy methacrylate) (PGMA) as an anchoring platform to overcome some of the aforementioned limitations. Finally, I will talk about some of the recent developments/applications using this anchoring platform in colloidal state for drug delivery and multimodal imaging.

 May 2013
Thursday 09
16:00 - EVENT - CMCA Seminar Series: Techniques and Applications in Marine and Biological Science More Information
SIMS is one of the most powerful characterization techniques for materials, chemistry, physics, and biology because of its unique capabilities to provide trace sensitivity (ppm to sub-ppb range) and excellent depth (as good as 1 nm) and lateral resolution (< 1 µm for ion microscopes and 30 nm for ion microprobes). In particular, it has become an indispensable characterization technique in the fields of marine and biological science which require analytical techniques capable of probing small areas and detecting impurities at low concentrations. A succinct review on the basic principles of SIMS, will be given, followed by a description of the current status on the SIMS technique. The principles of SIMS data acquisition will be illustrated as well as an evaluation of procedures to achieve useful information on the elemental, isotopic, and molecular composition of the respective samples. Some most intriguing results of SIMS studies in marine and biological science will be reviewed (including studies of diatom and otolith samples) and a comparison of SIMS with other micro-analytical techniques - such as AES, XPS, EPMA, TOF-SIMS, laser ablation ICP-MS, SNMS, PIXE and RBS will be made.
Monday 27
12:00 - SEMINAR - LIWA Medical Research Seminar Series : "A microscope in a needle: New technologies to image disease" Website | More Information
LIWA invites you to a free seminar on: "A microscope in a needle: New technologies to image disease" by A/Professor Robert McLaughlin, Optical+Biomedical Engineering Lab, The University of Western Australia. A light lunch will be served from 12.00pm with a 12.30pm – 1.30pm presentation.

12:00 - SEMINAR - The Power of Multiplexing More Information
Bring your biomarkers to life with simultaneous multianalyte detection. This seminar will showcase the use of cytometric bead assays to provide very highly multiplexed simultaneous analysis. A much more efficient approach than multiple ELISAs.

At the CMCA, we have instrumentation which will allow you to perform these multiplexed analyses.

Light refreshments provided.

 June 2013
Tuesday 04
16:30 - SEMINAR - CMCA Seminar: Quantitative MRI applications for investigating disease and monitoring the cellular uptake and biodistribution of nanoparticles and therapeutic drugs. More Information
MRI is an incredibly versatile imaging modality stemming from the wide range of approaches that can be applied to generate image contrast. While qualitative imaging is common in clinical MRI, increasingly quantitative methods capable of measuring molecular tissue properties are being exploited. In this seminar I will present an overview of my research focussing on the application of quantitative MRI approaches to measure and map the distribution of; 1) iron, fat and fibrosis in the body and 2) magnetic nanoparticles to enable cell tracking and biodistribution studies of therapeutic agents.

17:00 - PRESENTATION - WA Flow Meeting More Information
Please join us for this meeting of WA Flow, a Western Australian flow cytometry interest group. There will be presentations of applications, protocols, results, information and general discussion of current flow cytometry.

Three presentations: Dr Coral-Ann Almeida (IIID, Murdoch University) "Single cell sorts of CD8 T cell clones for HIV research", Kerryn Stoner and Rom Krueger (Pathwest, Royal Perth Hospital) "Minimal Residual Disease detection by Flow Cytometry in AML", and Irma Larma (WA Institute for Medical Research) "Back to Basics - Cell sorting: Principal and applications".

All welcome - refreshments provided.
Thursday 06
10:00 - EVENT - CMCA Seminar: Applications of magnetic resonance: From crickets to cortical dysplasias More Information
Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) based techniques have revolutionized chemical characterization of materials and non-invasive in-vivo diagnostics, with pioneers garnering Nobel Prizes in Chemistry for NMR spectroscopy, and in Medicine for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This seminar will begin with an overview of my experience in MR. Examples will be included from solid-state NMR spectroscopy, micro-MRI (hydrogen fuel cells, rheo-NMR), small animal MRI, and human MRI. In the latter portion of the seminar I will present some recent and interesting developments from the literature that aim to achieve novel MRI contrast linked to underlying micro-structure or biochemistry.

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