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Today's date is Wednesday, September 23, 2020
Centre for Microscopy Characterisation and Analysis
 May 2012
Thursday 17
16:00 - SEMINAR - CMCA Seminar Series : Measuring nanoparticle dispersion and in vitro cellular uptake by electron microscopy Website | More Information
'Measuring nanoparticle dispersion and in vitro cellular uptake by electron microscopy' presented by Nicole Hondow from the Institute for Materials Research, University of Leeds

Engineered nanoparticles have been the focus of much recent research with a wide-range of potential applications in catalysis, biomedicine, magnetic resonance imaging, data storage and environmental remediation. For biomedical applications these particles often have surface modification with organic molecules to stabilise them in biological suspensions, functionalise the surface and avoid immediate uptake or clearance by the immune system. Understanding the structure of particles after modification and when within cellular environments is criticial to their safe and successful application. At Leeds we have been developing a systematic approach to the characterisation of nanoparticles and their cellular uptake using electron microscopy. One approach is to draw on the imaging and analytical capabilities of transmission electron microscopes (TEMs) to characterise these particles before and after cellular uptake. A key challenge for this work is representative sample preparation, and we are examining this using CdTe/ZnS core/shell quantum dots dispersed in biological media and serum. The uptake of these nanoparticles by U2-OS human osteosarcoma cells has been examined by quantitative TEM imaging to determine the distribution of the nanoparticles in membrane bound vesicles and the cytoplasm. This is being extended into 3-D, using the Gatan 3-View system in the scanning electron microscope (SEM) to serial section resin-embedded cells exposed to quantum dots. By combining the information from TEM imaging (i.e. location and number of vesicles per 2-D cell section plus the number of quantum dots per vesicle) and serial sectioning (i.e. location, size and number of vesicles in whole cells (3-D)) with that provided by other techniques (such as optical imaging,) we are developing a fully quantitative description of cellular uptake of these quantum dots.

 June 2012
Thursday 07
10:00 - VISITING SPEAKER - The "all you can eat" guide to the Three Minute Thesis : Three Minute Thesis: A comprehensive guide to preparing and presenting a compelling 3MT talk Website | More Information
The Three MInute Thesis (3MT) is a fun and challenging event that encourages the communication of research to a wide audience. The UWA 3MT competition finals will be held on 25th July and this presentation is a comprehensive guide to the preparation and presentation of a compelling 3MT talk. The presenter, Simon Clews,is an experienced 3MT judge who has championed the 3MT competition in Australia and internationally.

16:00 - SEMINAR - CMCA Seminar Series More Information
X-ray crystallography is a method of determining the arrangement of atoms within a crystal. This talk will briefly outline the technique used in the determination of crystal structures with special reference to small molecules. The instrumentation which is available to researchers at UWA for diffraction experiments will also be described. A number of results from such experiments will be presented including examples of crystal structures from the various research areas within UWA.
Friday 29
9:30 - Demonstration - Hirox New Generation 3D Digital Microscope : The CMCA will be hosting a demonstration of a new 3D microscope (from Hirox) More Information
You are invited to attend this live demonstration of the new Hirox KH-8700. This will be an overview of the system and demonstration including the 3D rotary lenses, multifocal functions and a variety of unique lenses and adaptors. All are welcome to attend.

 July 2012
Thursday 05
16:00 - SEMINAR - CMCA Seminar Series - 5 [email protected] 4PM: Unlocking the secrets of archaeological materials from shipwrecks. Dr Ian Godfrey : Analyses of shipwreck artefacts using NMR spectroscopy Website | More Information
Analyses of shipwreck artefacts are essential in order to gain information about the chemical nature of materials, provenance, state of deterioration and even technological information about formation processes. For more than 20 years, conservation scientists from the WA Museum and UWA staff have collaborated to resolve many such issues, particularly those associated with organic archaeological materials. Solution NMR spectroscopy, for example, has been used to identify pitches, resins and tars, to gain information about the precursors to these materials and to reveal information about the heating regimes that they were subjected to in their preparation while solid state NMR spectroscopy has been used to determine the deterioration of waterlogged wood and ivory and to identify chemical processes that have occurred after their conservation treatment. Dr Godfrey’s illustrated presentation will highlight archaeological, conservation and analytical aspects of work undertaken on a variety of objects from local and international shipwrecks
Wednesday 25
12:00 - Competition - Three Minute Thesis Final : 10 PhD students will explain their research and its significance in just 3 minutes each. Website | More Information
The 3MT competition challenges research students to give a dynamic and engaging presentation about their research and its significance in a way that can be understood by everybody. The audience will select the "People's Choice" winner.

18:15 - EVENT - UWA Historical Society Annual Lecture 2012 : Mathematics and Women - 36 years at The University of Western Australia Website | More Information
The Annual Lecture is the highlight of the year for the UWA Historical Society and Convocation and we are delighted to welcome Winthrop Professor Cheryl Praeger to the podium to reflect upon her years on Campus and subsequent experiences and achievements.

Mathematician Cheryl Praeger has served the University of Western Australia as Lecturer, Senior Lecturer, and Professor since 1976. She leads a flourishing research group in pure mathematics and is in the top one per cent of highly cited mathematicians in the world.

Attendance is free.

 August 2012
Wednesday 01
14:00 - SEMINAR - In Vivo Pre-Clinical imaging using Optical Light More Information
With the recently acquired IVIS Lumina and Maestro instruments at UWA, researchers now have the ability to longitudinally and non-invasively monitor cancer (and other disease states) in small animal models using optical light. This seminar is intended to provide a high-level overview of the capabilities on the instruments, as well as answer any user specific questions. Focus areas will include: Monitoring tumour growth, Stem Cell research and Atherosclerosis, Tracking gene expression
Sunday 12
10:00 - EVENT - 2012 Open Day : Experience what's on offer at UWA Website | More Information
UWA opens up the whole campus to the public.

Come and find out about the courses on offer, career options, scholarship opportunities, our valuable research, community programs and facilities.

There's also residential college tours, hands-on activities, live music and entertainment, and plenty of fun activities for the whole family.
Friday 24
8:30 - CONFERENCE - Combined Biological Sciences Meeting 2012 : Full day meeting for all members of the life sciences community Website | More Information
CBSM aims to promote biological science in Western Australia by encouraging the interaction of scientists, students and industry representatives from all aspects of life science.

The meeting is designed to provide a platform for the exchange of ideas and expertise to keep the life sciences in WA at the cutting edge. This annual meeting includes plenary presentations by national and international scientists and in 2012 will incorporate concurrent specialist symposia each with its own keynote speaker and session of local senior scientists.

CBSM is also geared toward students and the development of students among their peers. Several sessions are set aside for student presentations and for many it represents their first chance to present their work in a conference setting. These honours and post-graduate students work in universities, research institutes, and industry around Western Australia. In this way CBSM offers a unique “snapshot” of what is happening in local biological science and now attracts 250-300 delegates every year, with nearly 40 oral presentations, over 70 scientific posters and 30 trade booths. Check out the program at www.cbsmwa.org.au/program.

So where will you be on Friday the 24th of August? Join us at the University Club, The University of Western Australia for CBSM 2012!

www.cbsmwa.org.au - [email protected]
Monday 27
10:00 - WORKSHOP - Flow Cytometry Data Analysis More Information
This workshop is recommended to anyone who is currently using or is thinking of using FlowJo for flow cytometry data analysis. The sessions will be very informative and you will pick up some new tricks! Sessions include: 10.00 am Basic Functionality, Groups Layouts, Tables, Batching, and 11.00am Compensation, Transforms, Advanced Analysis Platforms
Thursday 30
16:00 - SEMINAR - CMCA Seminar Series: Tools to better understand soil phosphorus - a finite and scarce resource. More Information
Phosphorus - a non-renewable resource - is a key element in food production and maintaining sustainable ecosystems. Predictions suggest global P fertiliser production may peak around 2030’s and will be one third of that peak level by the end of the 21st century. This will have a major impact on agriculture, especially heavily fertilised low P sandy soils of Western Australia.

 September 2012
Tuesday 04
9:30 - WORKSHOP - Using Photoshop to Prepare Images for Theses or Publication More Information
This workshop is a “hands-on” computing exercise and is scheduled to be conducted in the Pharmacology Computing Laboratory (room G17, M block QEII). Class size is strictly limited to 40 participants. Until 5 pm Monday 27th August, priority will be given to those with a current CMCA registration after which participation will be open to all on a “first in” basis. The workshop is free to attend but registration is essential. Please contact CMCA admin ([email protected]) to register. Also note, if you register and then fail to attend the workshop, a $50 non-attendance fee may be levied.

13:30 - EVENT - Using Image J for Image Analysis of Microscope Images - An Introduction More Information
This workshop is a “hands-on” computing exercise and is scheduled to be conducted in the Pharmacology Computing Laboratory (room G17, M block QEII). Class size is strictly limited to 40 participants. Until 5 pm Monday 27th August, priority will be given to those with a current CMCA registration after which participation will be open to all on a “first in” basis. The workshop is free to attend but registration is essential. Please contact CMCA admin ([email protected]) to register. Also note, if you register and then fail to attend the workshop, a $50 non-attendance fee may be levied.
Sunday 16
18:00 - SYMPOSIUM - 1st Symposium on Plant Signalling & Behaviour : A 5-day symposium covering themes from Plant Cell Biology & Signalling to Plant Sensory & Behavioural Ecology and Theoretical Botany Website | More Information
It is a great pleasure to invite you to participate in the very 1st Symposium on Plant Signalling & Behaviour (SPSB 2012) to be held at the University of Western Australia on 16th-21st September 2012.

The SPSB 2012 was conceived out of a desire to support and advance this new and exciting research area by bringing together a diverse group of researchers who are working and are concerned with plants, but who are doing so from very different perspectives. The aim of the symposium is to build a transdisciplinary bridge for the new emergent knowledge and view of the plant world to be shared widely and flourish into rewarding collaborative explorations.

Within a hot cauldron of creative thinking, the SPSB 2012 aims at providing you with the opportunity to showcase your recent research findings, to advance our current knowledge and understanding of plants and to exchange ideas with colleagues on themes ranging from Plant Cell Biology & Signalling to Plant Sensory & Behavioural Ecology, and Theoretical Botany.

SUBMISSION OF ABSTRACTS - now OPEN!!

 October 2012
Wednesday 10
12:30 - SEMINAR - OI Seminar Series - Michael Stat More Information
Title: Coral-dinoflagellate symbiosis: evolution, ecology and interaction states

Abstract: Corals form an obligate symbiosis with unicellular photosynthetic dinoflagellates. The diversity of dinoflagellates associated with a host is the result of both evolutionary and ecological influences. While mutualism is the paradigm for coral-dinoflagellate symbiosis, recent evidence shows that not all host-symbiont interactions are equally beneficial. The dynamics of host-symbiont partnerships and the exchange of nutrients that ultimately defines the interaction state of the symbiosis are important factors that contribute to the variability in response of corals to changes in the environment.

Biography: PhD 2006, University of Sydney 2006-2011, Postdoctoral Fellow, Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology, University of Hawaii 2011-current, IOMRC Post-Doctoral Fellow
Thursday 11
13:00 - SEMINAR - Personalised Fluorescent-based Call Analysis from Merck Millipore More Information
CMCA will be hosting a seminar on cell health by Laura Morley from Merck Millipore on Thursday 11th October 2012 from 1-2pm in the Pharmacology Seminar Room (Rm 1.18, 1st floor, M Block, QEII Medical Centre). The seminar will cover topics including viability, cell cycle and apoptosis assays and will introduce the Muse Cell Analyser instrument.

The seminar will be followed by a demonstration of the Muse Cell Analyser at [email protected] in lab 1.42 at 2pm.

16:00 - SEMINAR - Battling bacterial slime: Bacterial persistence mechanisms in chronic and recurrent respiratory infections More Information
Respiratory infections (including ear, nose, throat and lung infections) caused by viruses and bacteria are the most common diseases in children (and adults). Some children are particularly vulnerable to these, developing chronic or recurrent disease and reducing their quality of life, educational outcomes and life expectancy. Ways in which bacteria persist particularly in high-risk populations are poorly understood, as are immune responses to these bacteria. This means that many treatments that target the acute infection have little effect on the chronic or recurrent nature of the diseases. Likewise, preventions are difficult to develop in these vulnerable populations. Our work in the Vaccine Trials Groups and the School of Paediatrics and Child Health focuses on elucidating the role of bacterial biofilms (slime), intracellular infection and host immune response in the development of chronic and recurrent respiratory disease. This presentation will provide an overview of the work we have done and are currently conducting, including both basic research and translational studies.
Wednesday 17
8:30 - EVENT - Australia China Business Council Education Forum 2012 : Chinese Language and Cultural Competency in Schools and Industry - Real Links to a Sustainable Relationship Website | More Information
Whilst trade and enterprise have led Australia's bilateral relations with China, education promotes mutual understanding and long lasting links. This year's forum will focus on developing Chinese language and cultural competency in schools, universities and industry. His Excellency Mr Chen Yuming, Chinese Ambassador to Australia, will provide the keynote address and a panel of business leaders and education representatives will share their experiences.
Friday 26
13:30 - SEMINAR - Oceans Institute Seminar: DR CHRIS BARNES : Understanding earth/ocean processes: new opportunities and technologies through cabled ocean observatories such as NEPTUNE Canada More Information
Abstract: The oceans, bounded by the atmosphere, lithosphere and shore, and covering 70% of the Earth's surface remain a poorly understood component of the Earth system. The changing climate, ocean circulation and chemistry, and depletion of ocean life are increasing at an alarming rate, largely a consequence of human activities. It is imperative to improve public understanding of the changes, consequences and possible future options, and to develop responsive informed public policies. A more quantified scientific database is required not achieved from a century of investigations using buoys, battery operated instruments and ship-based investigations. Advent of the first cabled ocean observatories (e.g. in Canada (NEPTUNE Canada, VENUS), US (OOI, MARS), Japan (DONET), China, Taiwan (MACHO), and European Union (EMSO)) demonstrates challenges, benefits, opportunities and added values for ocean science and commercial applications. Introducing abundant power and high bandwidth communications into diverse ocean environments allows: discrimination between short and long-term events, interactive experiments, real-time data/imagery, and complex multidisciplinary teams interrogating vast interoperable databases over decades. Cabled observatories will transform ocean sciences, with a progressive wiring of the oceans. NEPTUNE Canada completed installation of the subsea infrastructure with over 100 instruments in 2009-10, establishing the world's first regional cabled observatory (northeast Pacific; 800km backbone cable, with five nodes on the coast, continental slope, abyssal plain, and ocean-spreading ridge (100-2660m)). Principal scientific themes are: plate tectonic processes and earthquake-tsunami dynamics; seabed fluid fluxes and gas hydrates; ocean/climate dynamics and biotic effects; deep-sea ecosystem dynamics; engineering/computational research. New knowledge, scientific interpretations, and policy applications are addressing: ocean/climate change, ocean acidification, mitigating natural hazards, non-renewable and renewable natural resources. Socio-economic benefits include: resource/hazard/environmental management, sovereignty, security, transportation, data services, and public policy.

Bio: Chris Barnes is Professor Emeritus in the School of Earth and Ocean Sciences, University of Victoria, and was Director of NEPTUNE Canada (2001-11), the world's first regional cabled ocean observatory network. For the previous decade, he served as Director of both the Centre for Earth and Ocean Research and the School of Earth and Ocean Sciences at the University of Victoria, British Columbia. He has a PhD in Geology from the University of Ottawa. He served as Chair of Earth Sciences both at the University of Waterloo, Ontario (1975-81) and at Memorial University of Newfoundland (1981-87); from 1987-89, he was the Director General of the Sedimentary and Marine Branch of the Geological Survey of Canada. He has served as President of the Geological Association of Canada, the Canadian Geoscience Council, and the Academy of Science of the Royal Society of Canada; and as a commissioner of the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission, as a member of the International Ocean Drilling Program, and on the Science Advisory Committees of EuroSITES, two Spanish ocean observatories, and Canada's Ocean Tracking Network. Fellowship has been awarded in the Royal Society of Canada and the National Academy of Sciences, Cordoba, Argentina. In 1996, he was appointed a Member of the Order of Canada.

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