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Today's date is Friday, November 27, 2020
Analytical Chemistry Postgraduate Program
 August 2012
Sunday 12
10:00 - EVENT - 2012 Open Day : Experience what's on offer at UWA Website | More Information
UWA opens up the whole campus to the public.

Come and find out about the courses on offer, career options, scholarship opportunities, our valuable research, community programs and facilities.

There's also residential college tours, hands-on activities, live music and entertainment, and plenty of fun activities for the whole family.

 September 2012
Wednesday 26
12:00 - SEMINAR - School of Chemistry and Biochemistry Seminar : When nano meets bio: Interdisciplinary applications of electron microscopy More Information
As leader of the electron microscopy capability in the Centre for Microscopy, Characterisation and Analysis (CMCA), my core role is to support those wanting to apply advanced electron microscopy techniques in their research. With a background in Physics and an interest in the development of microscopy techniques, I have traditionally collaborated with researchers in the physical sciences. The interdisciplinary nature of the CMCA has, however, encouraged collaborations that bridge the physical and biological sciences where my knowledge of electron microscopy complements the discipline-specific expertise within the research groups.

One area where the benefit of this fusion of technique and discipline-specific expertise is readily apparent is when the field of nanomaterials and nanotechnology meets the discipline of biology. From understanding nature’s ability to form minerals at the nanoscale to the interaction of man-made nanomaterials with biological systems, an interdisciplinary combination of physical and biological scientists with experts in characterisation techniques creates distinct advantages. I hope to demonstrate this by presenting data from several ongoing collaborations such as studies of biomineralisation processes in marine molluscs, magnetic nanomaterials for biomedical applications and drug delivery capsules.

The common theme of this research is the application of transmission electron microscopy techniques such as electron diffraction, high resolution imaging, energy-filtered TEM, and electron spectroscopy to extract structural and compositional information down to the nm or atomic scales.


 January 2013
Tuesday 15
13:00 - SEMINAR - Natural compounds as inhibitors of the 10 hallmarks of cancer : School of Anatomy, Physiology & Human Biology Raine Lecture More Information
Marc Diederich was awarded his PhD in molecular pharmacology in 1994 by the University Henri Poincaré Nancy 1, France. After training at the University of Cincinnati, USA, he focused his research on cancer and leukemia cell signaling pathways and gene expression mechanisms triggered by natural compounds with epigenetic-, anti-inflammatory- and cell death-inducing potential. Professor Diederich directs the Laboratory for molecular and cellular biology of cancer (LBMCC) at Kirchberg Hospital in Luxemburg. In 2012 he was appointed Associate Professor of Biochemistry at the College of Pharmacy of Seoul National University. Since 1998, he has been the organizer of the “Signal Transduction” meetings in Luxembourg. Professor Diederich’s research focuses on the development of novel anti-cancer drugs,for example, natural marine compounds which represent an interesting source of novel leads with potent chemotherapeutic or chemo-preventive activities. In the last decades, structure-activity-relationship studies have led to the development of naturally-derived or semi-synthetic analogues with improved bioactivity, a simplified synthetic target or less toxicity. Professor Diederich and his collaborators investigated for example chalcones that are aromatic ketones, known to exhibit anti-microbial, anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer activities. Organic sulfur compounds (OSCs) derived from plants, fungi or bacteria can also serve as chemopreventive and/or chemotherapeutic agents and attracted Professor Diederich’s interest as a promising source for novel anti-cancer agents.

 February 2013
Tuesday 05
17:00 - SEMINAR - WA Flow Group - Inaugural Meeting More Information
Inaugural Meeting of the WA Flow Group. Presentations by: Dr Senta Walton (Pathology & Laboratory Medicine UWA) "CD4+ T cells during MCMV infections'; Fiona Robins (Pathwest, Haematology) "CS&T application settings in diagnostic flow"; Dr Matt Linden (CMCA, UWA) "Flourish for panel design" Please RSVP for catering purposes.
Monday 18
9:00 - COURSE - Introductory Statistics : A short course using SPSS Website | More Information
The aim of this course is to introduce you to basic statistics. It will cover descriptive statistics (means and standard deviations); data exploration; basic categorical data analysis; simple linear regression and basic analysis of variance (ANOVA).

Subsidised rates are available for UWA Graduate Research Students.

Please register online.

 August 2013
Sunday 11
10:00 - OPEN DAY - 2013 Open Day : Join us for our Centenary Open Day and experience all that UWA has to offer Website | More Information
Come and find out about our undergraduate and postgraduate courses, career options, scholarship opportunities, our valuable research, community programs and facilities.

There's also residential college tours, hands-on activities, live music, entertainment, and plenty of fun activities for the whole family as we celebrate our 100th birthday.

 September 2013
Friday 27
16:00 - SEMINAR - A Beckman Coulter Discovery Science Award Lecture Prof. Glenn King (UQ, Institute for Molecular Bioscience, Division of Chemistry & Structural Biology) "Natural insecticides from spider venom for the control of crop pests and disease vectors" More Information
Part of The Bayliss Seminar Series https://www.chembiochem.uwa.edu.au/research/seminars

 October 2013
Wednesday 09
16:00 - SEMINAR - First-Principles Computational Thermochemistry: Theory and Applications More Information
During the past decade, computational chemistry has had an increasingly important impact on almost all branches of chemistry as a new approach for solving chemical problems at the molecular level and in obtaining information that is not accessible by experiment (e.g. in investigations involving transient, reactive, toxic, rare, or hypothetical species).

Theoretical methods have now been refined to the point where, for medium-sized systems with up to ~50 non-hydrogen atoms, they can determine very accurate molecular structures, reaction energies, barrier heights, spectroscopic constants and electrical properties.

First-principles thermochemical methods, such as Wn theories,1 combine large-scale electronic structure calculations with sophisticated extrapolation techniques to achieve unprecedented accuracies in thermochemical predictions. I will briefly review the Wn theories and show that they can reproduce the most accurate experimental thermochemical data with a 2σ uncertainty of under 1 kJ mol–1.1 For spectroscopic constants, Wn methods afford predictions with near-spectroscopic accuracy (i.e. 2σ uncertainty of ~1 cm–1).2 I will also present recent theoretical advances that extend the applicability of these theories to larger systems.3 Finally, some illustrative applications to water clusters,4 water-catalyzed proton-transfers,5 DNA bases,3 amino acids,6 tetrapeptides,7 corannulene8 and C60 will be given.

 November 2013
Monday 04
16:00 - SEMINAR - CMCA Seminar: Multimodal imaging for research More Information
Dr Gary Cowin was awarded a BSc (HONS), majoring in synthetic organic chemistry, from the University of New England followed by a PhD investigating renal metabolism from the University of Queensland. Dr Gary Cowin is the Facility Fellow for the Queensland Node of the National Imaging Facility (NIF) as part of the National Collaborative Research Infrastructure Scheme (NCRIS), based at the Centre for Advanced Imaging, University of Queensland. He is an MR physicist undertaking development and implementation of research programs on a range of research (Bruker) and clinical (Siemens) MRI systems and multimodality imaging, MRI/PET/CT, for plant, animal and human research. Specific areas of research include prostate, liver, spinal cord and development of simultaneous MRI/PET imaging. The MRI/PET system is the World's first commercial prototype that enables simultaneous acquisition of MRI and PET images for preclinical research. This MRI/PET system is a flagship instrument of the National Imaging Facility.
Tuesday 12
15:00 - VISITING SPEAKER - Variable parasites - variable defences? More Information
A world recognised specialist in the field of ecology and evolution of host-parasite interactions, Paul’s research interests focus on the coevolution and ecology of host-parasite interactions.

As head of the Experimental Ecology research group at ETH, his pioneering works on host-parasite interactions paved the way for innovative research worldwide.

The trypanosome Crithidia bombi infects several species of Bombus (bumblebees); here, we focus on B. terrestris. The parasite is spread by contacts on flowers and evidence shows that the infecting populations in the hosts are very prevalent and highly variable. At the same time, the presumably relevant genetic complements of the hosts are highly conserved. One alternative defence strategy is by variable gene expression and the synergistic actions of effector molecules. The concept and evidence for such a process are discussed.

 December 2013
Thursday 05
10:00 - SEMINAR - Analysing Biodiversity via Organelle Genomes : CHANGE OF DATE !!!!!!! Pls note: was Fri 6, now Thu 5 Dec! More Information
A Joint Seminar with speakers from ARC CoE Plant Energy Biology (UWA) and Kings Park Botanic Gardens & Parks Authority labs.

 March 2014
Thursday 20
15:30 - SEMINAR - CMCA Seminar Series: ZEISS Xradia 3D X-ray Microscopes More Information
The ZEISS Xradia Versa family and ZEISS Xradia Ultra lab platforms offer a multi-lengthscale solution. State of the art X-ray computed tomography (CT) scanning technology combined with highly specialized, proprietary X-ray optics deliver the highest performance lab-based 3D X-ray microscopes, providing a range of imaging modes from ~30 micron resolution all the way down to 50nm spatial resolution. The Xradia Versa uses patented X-ray detectors and a microscope turret of magnifying objective detectors for easy zooming. Scan mode from 30 micron resolution all the way down to 700 nm spatial resolution. The Xradia Ultra nanoscale X-ray microscope is the only commercially available X-ray microscope that utilizes synchrotron quality X-ray optics and provides true spatial resolution down to <50nm

ZEISS Xradia 520 Versa: The flagship product of the award-winning Xradia Versa family provides the most advanced and highest performing non-destructive, 3D imaging and analysis capabilities. Xradia 520 Versa extends the boundaries of non-destructive 3D imaging with advanced contrast tuning capabilities, extensive filtering options, and enhancements delivering greater accuracy and workflow. Xradia 520 Versa frees researchers to push the boundaries of lab-based imaging. With prominent facilities worldwide using non-destructive X-ray microscopy (XRM) to extend the use of valuable samples, the ZEISS Xradia Versa family proves a powerful component of a correlative microscopy solution. Xradia 520 Versa adds a host of innovations to ZEISS Xradia's industry-leading resolution, contrast and powerful advantages for conducting in situ studies under native or controlled conditions. The instrument delivers compositional contrast for better discernment between materials appearing nearly identical, faster time-to-results for time-sensitive applications, and superior ease-of-use for multi-user environments. Xradia Versa solutions are ideal for highly skilled users as well as busy imaging labs with diverse user needs and skillsets. Breakthrough applications for Xradia 520 Versa include compositional contrast in materials science, high aspect ratio tomography for semiconductor failure analysis and 4D studies of material evolution over time. Highlights include advanced contrast tuning capabilities, extensive filtering options, and faster time to results with higher throughput.

 April 2014
Wednesday 09
15:30 - SEMINAR - CMCA Seminar Series: 3D Raman imaging meets AFM, SNOM and profilometry More Information
Knowledge about the morphology and chemical composition of heterogeneous materials on a sub-micrometer scale is crucial for the development of new material properties for highly specified applications. However, each analytical measuring technique has limitations, which may be overcome by their combination. Confocal microscopy has been used to reconstruct three-dimensional images of micro-objects by using a spatial pinhole to eliminate out-of focus light in specimens thicker than the focal plane. Raman spectroscopy on the other hand is able to determine the chemical compositions of materials. The confocal Raman microscope combines Raman spectroscopy with high resolution confocal microscopy. The discrimination of out of focus information used in confocal microscopy is particularly beneficial for confocal Raman imaging since it reduces the volume from which the Raman spectrum is collected. Due to the confocal principle, depth information from transparent materials can be easily obtained, leading to full three dimensional chemical reconstructions of the material’s composition. The combination of confocal Raman microscopy with SPM and true surface microscopy permits characterization of materials at submicron resolution, as well as on mm-rough surfaces across large areas. Examples from various fields of applications will be presented.
Monday 14
13:00 - SEMINAR - Infrared spectroscopy for clinical chemistry: from laboratory assays to continuous minimal-invasive and non-invasive patient blood glucose monitoring More Information
Infrared spectroscopic assays for body fluid analysis are of great interest, because these are reagentless and allow the simultaneous analysis of several analytes. Different measurement techniques have been routinely utilized for blood and derived fluids such as plasma, serum and dialysates. Samples can be fluids or dry-films prepared by water evaporation, and high-throughput applications have been reported recently by us for cancer screening applications.

Continuous measurement technology for patient monitoring has been realized in combination with micro-dialysis. The performance of our infrared spectrometer-based system was tested in several clinical measurement campaigns, using the sensor also in combination with a programmed insulin pump for testing our «artificial pancreas system« for type 1 diabetic subjects and critically ill patients. For safeguarding the spectroscopic multivariate calibration models, the influence of various drugs, when administered in amounts to reach therapeutic concentration levels, has been investigated for glucose cross-sensitivities.

Another promising spectroscopic application is non-invasive blood glucose assay technology based on either near-infrared spectroscopy using the diffuse reflection technique or mid-infrared photoacoustic spectroscopy. An outlook will be given, whether novel photonic technology based on quantum cascade lasers can replace currently favoured electrochemical enzymatic biosensors for continuous metabolite monitoring.

 May 2014
Tuesday 13
13:00 - SEMINAR - Ticking off developmental checkpoints: the importance of circadian rhythms during pregnancy : School of Anatomy, Physiology & Human Biology Seminar Series More Information
The Speaker: Peter Mark completed a PhD in the Department of Pharmacology at The University of Western Australia in breast cancer research. He investigated the component structure of the estrogen receptor complex in the absence of hormone and determined how this altered the receptor’s response to estrogen. He is currently an Assistant Professor in the School of Anatomy, Physiology & Human Biology at UWA, where he is actively involved in teaching and research in reproductive biology. He is particularly interested in placental factors that act as drivers of fetal growth and development.

The Seminar: Insults during pregnancy, including maternal under/overnutrition, excess fetal glucocorticoid exposure and altered circadian rhythms can result in small for gestational age babies through placental dysfunction. These insults drive physiological and anatomical adaptations in the placenta and fetus, to allow for immediate survival, but predispose the offspring to adult-onset diseases such as hypertension, diabetes and obesity. Our recent research has focussed on circadian rhythms in placental function and how these may impact on nutrient transfer to the developing fetus. Disturbances in maternal circadian rhythms can alter fetal growth trajectories and program offspring for adverse health outcomes, but whether disruption of placental rhythms contributes to these effects is unknown. The presentation will provide evidence for placental circadian rhythms and discuss potential circadian treatments to improve neonatal outcomes for premature babies.

 June 2014
Wednesday 11
16:00 - SEMINAR - How a hijacked protein became a gateway to studying the evolution of proteins : This seminar is part of the Centre for Water Research seminar series. Website | More Information
A few years ago we stumbled upon an interesting peptide biosynthesis in sunflower seeds. A small peptide was buried inside another protein and the peptide emerged from its hiding place by hijacking the protein processing machinery of the 'host' protein. This system has become a lead-in to studying the evolution of proteins.

It recently allowed us to trace the biochemical steps that we think led to the 'birth' or de novo evolution of a protein. With it for example, we can also ask how easily new proteins might be created and how they manage to mimic other proteins. We recently found the processing machinery that was hijacked has evolved a dual functionality. I will discuss the biosynthesis and what it's teaching us, but I promise not to get too detailed!

Bio

Assoc. Prof. Mylne (PhD, Botany) worked at the John Innes Centre in the UK (2001-2005), using molecular genetics to study proteins that accelerate flowering in response to prolonged cold (vernalization). In 2006 he moved to the Division of Chemistry & Structural Biology at The Institute for Molecular Bioscience (IMB, UQ) where he held a QEII Fellowship (2008-2012) and was the inaugural John S. Mattick Fellow (2010-2012).

In 2013 he joined the faculty at The University of Western Australia and took up an ARC Future Fellowship in the School of Chemistry & Biochemistry and The ARC Centre of Excellence in Plant Energy Biology. His research interests are protein evolution and the molecular mechanisms underlying the biosynthesis of bioactive peptides.

www.uwa.edu.au/people/joshua.mylne

PS* This seminar is free and open to the public & no RSVP required.

****All Welcome****




 August 2014
Sunday 10
10:00 - OPEN DAY - 2014 Open Day : Join us for our Open Day and experience all that UWA has to offer Website | More Information
Come and find out about UWA’s undergraduate and postgraduate courses, scholarship opportunities, outstanding career options and explore our community programs and facilities.

This year there will be campus tram tours, hands-on activities, live music and entertainment, as well as plenty of fun activities for the whole family to enjoy.

Join us for Open Day 2014 from 10.00am to 4.00pm on Sunday 10 August.
Tuesday 12
16:00 - STUDENT EVENT - Student Information Sundowner for potential PhD and honours : Harry Perkins Institute of Medical Research, Tuesday 12 August 4pm to 6pm Website | More Information
Talk to our internationally renowned medical researchers individually. All available Honours and PhD student projects outlined at this casual sundowner in the stunning foyer of the new Perkins building within QEII. Park in the visitors carpark off Verdun street.
Thursday 14
16:00 - TALK - The new X-ray Surface Analysis Facility at Curtin More Information
Surface science underpins all modern technology from Gore-Tex to the iPhone. We need to think about surfaces for catalysis, corrosion, coatings, growth of thin films, chemical/biological functionalization and nanotechnology just to name a few. Over the last few months Curtin has established a surface analysis facility based around a brand new x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) system. Using XPS one can determine the elemental and chemical composition of the first few nanometres of a sample surface. The XPS can also take images for chemical mapping and has a number of other electron, ion and photon-based techniques for surface analysis. The lab was established in partnership with UWA and can be accessed by all UWA researchers.

This talk will introduce the techniques available with a focus on XPS, and give some examples of how they can be used for materials science. The surface analysis facility is now available for users and a brief explanation will be given on how people can get training and access.
Saturday 16
15:00 - EVENT - More Than Honey - The Movie - Free Event : Fifty years ago, Einstein had already insisted on the symbiotic relationship binding these pollen gatherers to mankind: “If bees were to disappear from the globe,” he predicted, “mankind would only have four years left to live.” Website | More Information
More Than Honey is a film on the relationship between mankind and honeybees, about nature and about our future.

This documentary by the Swiss filmmaker Marcus Imhoof and narrated by John Hurt is looking into the fascinating world of bees, showing small family beekeepers (including the beekeeper of ERSTE Foundation beehive, Heidrun Singer) and industrialized honey farms.

More Than Honey is a film on the relationship between mankind and honeybees, about nature and about our future. Honeybees show us that stability is just as unhealthy as unlimited growth, that crises and disasters are triggering evolution and that salvation sometimes comes from a completely unexpected direction.

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