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Today's date is Tuesday, July 07, 2020
Faculty of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences
 July 2012
Wednesday 25
12:00 - Competition - Three Minute Thesis Final : 10 PhD students will explain their research and its significance in just 3 minutes each. Website | More Information
The 3MT competition challenges research students to give a dynamic and engaging presentation about their research and its significance in a way that can be understood by everybody. The audience will select the "People's Choice" winner.

18:15 - EVENT - UWA Historical Society Annual Lecture 2012 : Mathematics and Women - 36 years at The University of Western Australia Website | More Information
The Annual Lecture is the highlight of the year for the UWA Historical Society and Convocation and we are delighted to welcome Winthrop Professor Cheryl Praeger to the podium to reflect upon her years on Campus and subsequent experiences and achievements.

Mathematician Cheryl Praeger has served the University of Western Australia as Lecturer, Senior Lecturer, and Professor since 1976. She leads a flourishing research group in pure mathematics and is in the top one per cent of highly cited mathematicians in the world.

Attendance is free.

19:30 - CONCERT - Festival Baroque Australia Presents: Nine German Arias Website | More Information
Nine German Arias - Hymns to Nature by George Frideric Handel

Sung by Sara Macliver, Soprano

Accompanied by Paul Wright, violin; Noeleen Wright, cello; Andrew Tait, violone; Stewart Smith, harpsichord and chamber organ. Wednesday 25 July 7.30pm Government House Ballroom Tickets: $60/$50 conc/$20 student To Book: UWA extension / 08 6488 2243 / https://tiny.cc/NineGermanArias
Thursday 26
16:30 - SEMINAR - UWA Religion and Globalisation Seminar - Economics and Theology : An Overview of the new Interdisciplinary Field and its Significance Website | More Information
Professor Paul Oslington will present dimensions of the renewed engagement between economics and theology. He will trace the theological influences and origins of economics, discuss religious economics as well as religion and development. The seminar will cover Adam Smith’s invisible hand, Islamic economics and the World Bank’s engagement with world faiths as well as the future of the dialogue at the boundaries between theology and economics.
Tuesday 31
16:00 - PUBLIC LECTURE - Visiting CMSS Fellow “The Bureaucracy and the Politics of Identity” : A lecture by Bambang Purwoko on a Study on the Influence of Ethnicity In The Bureaucratic Restructuring Process In Sorong Selatan Regency, West Papua, Indonesia. More Information
Visiting CMSS Fellow, Mr. Bambang Purwoko, will complete his ground-breaking study examining the impact of ethnicity and political identity on the bureaucracy in the Sorong-Selatan Regency of the Indonesian province of West Papua. This study was born of a longstanding desire to understand and address the fundamental reasons underlying the chronically poor performance of the bureaucracy in local governments in West Papua

 August 2012
Thursday 02
13:10 - PERFORMANCE - Free Lunchtime Concert : Visiting Artist - West Australian Opera Website | More Information
Friday 03
19:30 - PERFORMANCE - School of Music and Institute of Advanced Studies presents: Chamber! Three: Julianne Baird Website | More Information
American soprano Julianne Baird returns to The University of Western Australia as IAS Professor-at-Large to perform in this special event. Baird is renowned as an early music specialist and possesses a magnificent voice. She will be joined in recital by Paul Wright (violin) and other outstanding performers in an evening of chamber bliss.
Thursday 09
13:10 - PERFORMANCE - Free Lunchtime Concert : The Winthrop Singers Website | More Information
Friday 10
13:00 - SEMINAR - Ireland: Church, State and Society, 1800-1870 : Seminar Series More Information
"The Irish Catholic Community and the State in the 19th Century: Setting the Scene"

Professor Oliver Rafferty SJ, the 2012 St Thomas More College Chair of Jesuit Studies, will present the first in a series of six lectures on nineteenth century Irish history.

The Chair of Jesuit Studies is jointly recognised by the the University of Western Australia and the University of Notre Dame Australia, and aims to bring a leading academic from the worldwide Jesuit community to Perth each year.

Professor Rafferty is visiting from Heythrop College, University of London, where he specialises in Irish and Ecclesiastical history. He will present the remaining five seminars in the same locations, and at the same time, on Fridays 17th and 24th August, and Fridays 7th, 14th, and 21st September.

15:00 - PUBLIC TALK - The Futures of the Biologically Designable : Public talk with Orkan Telhan Website | More Information
Glowing plants, drug-delivering artificial cells, smell-changing bacteria, propelling mouse tissues… Today, new kinds of biological designs are increasingly gaining public awareness and shifting biological imagination towards new horizons. Next to scientists and engineers, do-it-yourself biologists are claiming crucial roles as the hackers, artists, designers, cultural theorists, and entrepreneurs of the biophilic era. As Synthetic Biology is becoming the go-to-discipline to those who are interested in the biochemical design space, engineering principles become the driving force behind designed biologies.

But what do we mean by “design” when we talk about biological design?

In this two-part talk, Orkan Telhan will trace the long history of biological design rather quickly through a series of designed and commercialized biological artifacts and offer a more discursive view on the evolution of the biologically designable beyond specific disciplinary agendas. Secondly, Telhan will reflect on the outcomes of his research residency at SymbioticA and briefly discuss his current project on “Biosynthesis and the Futures of Sandalwood.”

Current SymbioticA resident Orkan Telhan is an interdisciplinary artist, designer and researcher whose investigations focus on the design of interrogative objects, interfaces, and media, engaging with critical issues in social, cultural, and environmental responsibility. Telhan is Assistant Professor of Fine Arts - Emerging Design Practices at University of Pennsylvania, School of Design. Telhan is working towards his PhD in Design and Computation at MIT School of Architecture and Planning. He was part of the Sociable Media Group at the MIT Media Laboratory. He studied Media Arts at the State University of New York at Buffalo and theories of media and representation, visual studies and graphic design at Bilkent University, Ankara. Telhan's individual and collaborative work has been exhibited in a number of venues including Ars Electronica, ISEA, LABoral, Archilab, Architectural Association, Architectural League/ NYC, and the MIT Museum.
Sunday 12
10:00 - EVENT - 2012 Open Day : Experience what's on offer at UWA Website | More Information
UWA opens up the whole campus to the public.

Come and find out about the courses on offer, career options, scholarship opportunities, our valuable research, community programs and facilities.

There's also residential college tours, hands-on activities, live music and entertainment, and plenty of fun activities for the whole family.
Tuesday 14
13:00 - PUBLIC TALK - Blue Stockings in the Cultural Precinct : Panel Discussion More Information
For Blue Stockings Week this year (13-17 August), the Berndt Museum is presenting a panel discussion on the important role of women within the UWA Cultural Precinct. Blue Stockings Week is a commemoration of the Blue Stockings Society, an 18th century club for 'clever ladies and their gentlemen friends'. The club encouraged women to discuss intellectual topics over a cup of tea, thereby bucking the trend of succumbing to the frivolous topics and endeavours expected of women during that time. The name emerged from the habit of dressing down during the club's meetings, whereby the women wore blue woolen legwear, as opposed to the silk stockings traditional to evening meetings.

The panel will consist of Emeritus Professor Margaret Seares AO, Professor Sandy Toussaint and Curator Lee Kinsella.

15:00 - EVENT - Australia-China Tea & Talk : Join us for free tea and practice your Mandarin or English! More Information
Come down to room G25 in Asian Studies every Tuesday between 3-5pm to meet some new friends, practice your language skills and enjoy some free Chinese tea! It's not a class so feel free to come and go as you wish!

18:30 - EVENT - The Shakespeare Songbook Website | More Information
A public lecture and performance by Julianne Baird, Distinguished Professor, Rutgers University and Internationally Acclaimed Early Music Scholar-Performer.

What can we learn from Shakespeare’s use of music and from musical references in his plays? In this lecture-performance, renowned soprano Julianne Baird will discuss and perform music from Elizabethan and Jacobean times conceived for performance in the plays of the great Bard. William Shakespeare alludes to or includes the texts of well over 160 songs in his plays.

Music in Shakespeare’s time ran the gamut of lute songs by the famous contrapuntalist, John Dowland, madrigals and fa la’s (ballets) by Morely and, of course, the great polyphonies and verse anthems by William Byrd. But extant Elizabethan and Jacobean theatre music is much more simple and vivid, often almost ballad-like in style and the playwright seems to have had a genuine fondness for honest English popular and traditional songs. The poignancy of having Desdemona sing the Willow Song in her fatal hour shows his full commitment to music’s emotional power.

The audience of Shakespeare’s time would have expected each drama to have included at least one song per play, (with the exception of tragedies which usually contained only the heraldic and militaristic sounds of trumpets and drums.)

Not only are the musical references far more numerous, but Shakespeare defied this orthodoxy and wrote poetry for the tragedies which movingly uses musical reference as dramatic device.

Among the Elizabethan pieces performed at the lecture-recital will be “The Willow Song”, “Farewell Dear Heart” “O Mistriss Mine”, and “Ah Robyn, Gentil Robyn.” A number of pieces written for the Jacobean revivals of Shakespeare’s plays composers John Wilson and Robert Johnson will also be discussed and performed.

Cost: free, however RSVP is essential to [email protected] or 6488 1340.
Thursday 16
13:10 - CANCELLED - PERFORMANCE - Free Lunchtime Concert: : UWA Clarinet Quartet Website | More Information
Unfortunately this event has been cancelled.



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Friday 17
9:00 - CONFERENCE - CMEMS/PMRG Annual Conference: 'Receptions: Medieval and Early Modern Cultural Appropriations' : Conference of UWA Centre for Medieval and Early Modern Studies / Perth Medieval and Renaissance Group Website | More Information
The conference explores cultural appropriations in, by and of the medieval and early modern world, across a range of disciplines. The three main sub-themes are: 1. the appropriation of earlier cultures by the medieval or early modern world; 2. cultural exchanges and frontier encounters within the medieval and early modern world; and 3. the reception or appropriation of the medieval or early modern by later periods. Those interested can register online at https://www.pmrg.arts.uwa.edu.au/2012_conference or pay at the door.

13:00 - SEMINAR - Ireland: Church, State and Society, 1800-1870 : Seminar Series More Information
"The Catholic Church and the Union"

Professor Oliver Rafferty SJ, the 2012 St Thomas More College Chair of Jesuit Studies, will present the second in a series of six lectures on nineteenth century Irish history.

The Chair of Jesuit Studies is jointly recognised by the the University of Western Australia and the University of Notre Dame Australia, and aims to bring a leading academic from the worldwide Jesuit community to Perth each year.

Professor Rafferty is visiting from Heythrop College, University of London, where he specialises in Irish and Ecclesiastical history. He will present the remaining four seminars in the same locations, and at the same time, on Friday 24th August, and Fridays 7th, 14th, and 21st September.
Sunday 19
15:00 - PERFORMANCE - Keyed Up! Three : Geoffrey Lancaster (piano) Website | More Information
For the past 30 years, Geoffrey Lancaster has been at the forefront of the historically informed performance practice movement. Associate Professor Lancaster has appeared as conductor or soloist with all the Symphony Australia orchestras and the Australian Chamber Orchestra.
Tuesday 21
17:00 - CANCELLED - LECTURE - Distinguished International Guest Lecture Series : Dr Penelope Woods Website | More Information
Unfortunately this event has been cancelled.

Lecture not longer taking place

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Dr Penelope Woods, ARC Centre of Excellence for History of Emotions, The University of Western Australia. Musical Emotions on the Shakespearean Stage.

18:00 - PUBLIC LECTURE - Beauty, Love, and Art: The Legacy of Ancient Greece Website | More Information
A public lecture by David Konstan, Professor of Classics, New York University and visiting UWA Institute of Advanced Studies Professor-at-Large.

There is a deep problem with beauty. Beauty is commonly equated with sexual attractiveness. Yet there is also the beauty of art, which arouses an aesthetic response of disinterested contemplation.

As Roger Scruton writes in his recent book, Beauty (2009): “In the realm of art beauty is an object of contemplation, not desire.”

Are there, then, two kinds of beauty? By looking back the classical Greek conception of beauty, we may see how it gave rise to the modern dilemma, and some possible ways of resolving it.

This lecture is presented by the Institute of Advanced Studies at UWA and the ARC Centre of Excellence for the History of Emotions.

Cost: Free. RSVP to [email protected]

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