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Today's date is Tuesday, October 20, 2020
School of Animal Biology
 August 2012
Friday 03
15:00 - PUBLIC TALK - Tsunami Debris and Synthetic Habitats in Pelagic Waters : Public talk with Paul Sharp (Founder of Two Hands project) Website | More Information
Paul Sharp is founder of Two Hands Project and works on issues of plastic pollution, particularly in the marine environment. Two Hands Project is a collaborative approach to dealing with plastic pollution: take 30 Minutes and Two Hands to clean up yOUR world anytime, anywhere.

Two Hands embodies the spirit of the huge national/international clean up days but asks what you can do with your two hands in 30 minutes, at a location near you, on any day of the year. We are taking it all back to grass roots, looking at what you can do to care for the place(s) that are near to you or important to you, anytime that you want. Whether you’re doing this to improve the health of our oceans, reduce the risk to wildlife or to simply clean up unsightly trash in one of your favorite parks or beaches, what you can do with your own Two Hands is easy.

Sharp will be talking about his recent experiences in the North Pacific, where he was part of the 5 Gyres/Algalita Marine Research Foundation Tsunami Debris Expedition.

twohandsproject.org

16:00 - SEMINAR - PaLM Seminar Series (RPH) 2012 - Doctor Zak Hughes Seminar presentation More Information
All welcome to attend the School of Pathology & Laboratory Medicine 2012 Seminar Series (RPH). On a weekly basis we have local/guest speakers presenting to a wide audience typically in the fields of immunology, molecular biology and cancer related research. This week we are privileged to have a local speaker. Doctor Zak Hughes from the Nanochemistry Research Institute, Curtin University presenting on "Using Molecular Simulation to Determine the Effect of Cryosolvents on Phospholipid Bilayers". The event is sponsored by Life Technologies and light refreshments are provided. For further inquiries please contact using the provided email. Look forward to seeing you there!
Tuesday 07
13:00 - SEMINAR - Prenatal glucocorticoids, placental development and neurological function : School of Anatomy, Physiology and Human Biology Seminar Series More Information
The Seminar: Fetal glucocorticoid exposure is a key mechanism proposed to underlie prenatal "programming" of adult cardiometabolic and neuropsychiatric disorders. Regulation of fetal glucocorticoid exposure is achieved by the placental and fetal glucocorticoid "barrier," which involves glucocorticoid inactivation by 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 2 (11beta-HSD2). Mice null for 11beta-HSD2 exhibit altered placental development and function, decreased birth weight, delayed neurodevelopment and increased anxiety and depressive-like behaviour as adults. This raises the question as to whether it is placental or fetal brain 11b-HSD2 that underpins programmed outcomes? Preliminary data suggest that fetal brain 11beta-HSD2 impacts specifically on depressive-like behaviours, but that broader anxiety-related and neurodevelopmental effects are likely to relate to indirect effects of 11-HSD2 in the placenta.

The Speaker: Caitlin completed her PhD at UWA under the supervision of Prof Brendan Waddell and Dr Peter Mark, where she focused on developmental programming and the significance of omega-3 intake in attenuating adverse health outcomes. Caitlin moved to Edinburgh in 2006 to take up a postdoctoral position at The Queen's Medical Research Institute. Here she continued her research interest in developmental programming in the lab of Prof Jonathan Seckl and Prof Megan Holmes. Caitlin then returned to Perth in late 2011 to commence an Assistant Professor position at The School of Anatomy , Phsiology and Human Biology at UWA.
Sunday 12
10:00 - EVENT - 2012 Open Day : Experience what's on offer at UWA Website | More Information
UWA opens up the whole campus to the public.

Come and find out about the courses on offer, career options, scholarship opportunities, our valuable research, community programs and facilities.

There's also residential college tours, hands-on activities, live music and entertainment, and plenty of fun activities for the whole family.
Tuesday 14
13:00 - EVENT - UWA Careers Centre-Public Sector Commission : Considering a career in the public service? Graduating soon and still searching for a job? Website | More Information
Come along to the Working in WA State Government information session. The session is open to students from all years and all disciplines. You will be surprised at the opportunities available in the public service.

Bookings on CareerHub – https://uwa.careerhub.com.au
Wednesday 15
12:00 - SEMINAR - Choosing science comes more from the heart than from the brain (or the pocket) : A retrospective study of why scientists chose to study science Website | More Information
The ‘science pipeline’ in Australia is under threat because not enough budding scientists are moving through from school to university to science-based jobs. The aim of this research was to retrospectively survey current Australian and New Zealand scientists to ascertain why they chose to study science. The quantitative data from 722 respondents showed that, unsurprisingly, the main reasons were that they were interested in science and they were good at science. Secondary school science classes and one particular science teacher also were found to be important factors. Of more interest are their anecdotes about the challenges of becoming a scientist, some of which will be shared in this presentation.
Thursday 16
16:00 - VISITING SPEAKER - RNA editing and DYW-type PPR proteins as specificity factors in mitochondria of the moss Physcomitrella patens and the protist Naegleria gruberi : Numerous cytidines are converted into uridines by site-specific RNA editing of mitochondrial and chloroplast transcripts, which corrects genetic information in land plants. More Information
In flowering plants, mitochondrial transcriptomes contain some 300–500 RNA editing sites and chloroplast transcriptomes approximately 30 editing sites. In lycophytes, RNA editing is particularly abundant with more than 2100 editing sites in mitochondrial mRNAs and rRNAs of the spikemoss Selaginella moellendorffii. In contrast, only 11 sites are identified in mitochondria of the model plant Physcomitrella patens, making this moss an attractive model for functional studies. Pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) proteins with unique carboxyterminal extensions (E/DYW) encoded by extended nuclear gene families in plants have previously been characterized as specificity factors recognizing editing sites. PPR proteins with the DYW domain in particular were shown to perfectly correlate with the presence of RNA editing in evolution. Our DYW-PPR gene knockout studies in Physcomitrella will contribute to identify the full set of nuclear specificity factors addressing all editing sites in a plant mitochondrial transcriptome. Most surprisingly, we recently also identified DYW-type PPR proteins in the heterolobosean protist Naegleria gruberi. Interestingly, we were now able to identify C-to-U editing in the mitochondrial transcriptome of this protist, which is phylogenetically separated from the plant lineage by more than 1 billion years of evolution.
Friday 17
16:00 - SEMINAR - PaLM Seminar Series (RPH) 2012 - Associate Professor Vincent Williams Seminar presentation More Information
All welcome to attend the School of Pathology & Laboratory Medicine 2012 Seminar Series (RPH). On a weekly basis we have local/guest speakers presenting to a wide audience typically in the fields of immunology, molecular biology and cancer related research. This week we are privileged to have a local speaker. Associate Professor Vincent Williams from the School of Biomedical Sciences, Curtin University presenting on "Optimising the diagnosis of anal disease in high risk sexual health clinic patients". The event is sponsored by Life Technologies and light refreshments are provided. For further inquiries please contact using the provided email. Look forward to seeing you there!
Tuesday 21
13:00 - SEMINAR - Stroke and cerebral ischaemia: exploring potential neuroprotective strategies : School of Anatomy, Physiology & Human Biology Seminar Series More Information
The Seminar: We have previously reported that treatment with magnesium following global and focal cerebral ischaemia does not reduce brain damage in normothermic rats (1, 2). However we have shown that mild hypothermia (35°C) combined with magnesium is more effective than either treatment used alone following global and focal ischaemia (3). Treatment is effective when commenced 2 hours post global ischaemia and when commenced 2 or 4, but not 6 hours post-permanent focal ischaemia (4). We are currently further defining therapeutic windows following global ischaemia and transient focal ischaemia.

The Speaker: Bruno Meloni obtained his Bachelor of Science degree at Curtin University in 1985 and his PhD degree at Murdoch University in 1993. In 1996, he started a second Postdoctoral position with the newly formed Stroke Research Group, situated at the ANRI and headed by Clinical Professor Neville Knuckey. A/Prof Meloni was responsible for setting up the molecular biology, in vitro cultivation and animal surgery laboratories and has played a major role in overseeing its direction over the last 15 years. A/Prof Meloni's research has focussed on identifying neuroprotective proteins for the development of potential treatments for ischaemic brain injury and assessing the effectiveness of mild hypothermia and magnesium as a neuroprotective therapy following cerebral ischaemia. To this end, his talk will focus on experimental work performed by the Stroke Research Group over the last several years characterising the efficacy of mild hypothermia and magnesium in stroke and global cerebral ischaemia rat models.
Thursday 23
17:00 - WELCOME - NEW ACADEMIC STAFF MEMBER! "By Way of Introduction" : Dr Mylne is soon to join UWA as an ARC Future Fellow. More Information
Currently at University of Queensland, Dr Mylne will speak about his past, current and future plans for his Fellowship at UWA. Welcome Dr Mylne! "At UWA I intend to focus on three areas; 1) study the various genetic ‘innovations’ that create these ultra-stable peptides, 2) hone in on the in vivo biochemical process that produce such biomedically relevant peptides; and 3) develop a new biological system to discover the elusive biochemical targets of important anti-malarials drugs." DETAILED CV AVAILABLE !!! email [email protected]
Friday 24
8:30 - CONFERENCE - Combined Biological Sciences Meeting 2012 : Full day meeting for all members of the life sciences community Website | More Information
CBSM aims to promote biological science in Western Australia by encouraging the interaction of scientists, students and industry representatives from all aspects of life science.

The meeting is designed to provide a platform for the exchange of ideas and expertise to keep the life sciences in WA at the cutting edge. This annual meeting includes plenary presentations by national and international scientists and in 2012 will incorporate concurrent specialist symposia each with its own keynote speaker and session of local senior scientists.

CBSM is also geared toward students and the development of students among their peers. Several sessions are set aside for student presentations and for many it represents their first chance to present their work in a conference setting. These honours and post-graduate students work in universities, research institutes, and industry around Western Australia. In this way CBSM offers a unique “snapshot” of what is happening in local biological science and now attracts 250-300 delegates every year, with nearly 40 oral presentations, over 70 scientific posters and 30 trade booths. Check out the program at www.cbsmwa.org.au/program.

So where will you be on Friday the 24th of August? Join us at the University Club, The University of Western Australia for CBSM 2012!

www.cbsmwa.org.au - [email protected]
Monday 27
10:00 - WORKSHOP - Flow Cytometry Data Analysis More Information
This workshop is recommended to anyone who is currently using or is thinking of using FlowJo for flow cytometry data analysis. The sessions will be very informative and you will pick up some new tricks! Sessions include: 10.00 am Basic Functionality, Groups Layouts, Tables, Batching, and 11.00am Compensation, Transforms, Advanced Analysis Platforms
Tuesday 28
13:00 - SEMINAR - The biomechanical environment modulates airway smooth muscle phenotype and function in vitro: implications for studying asthma : School of Anatomy, Physiology & Human Biology Seminar Series More Information
The Seminar: The cellular and molecular biology of airway smooth muscle (ASM) is typically studied with single-cell cultures grown on solid, thus extremely stiff, 2D substrates. However cells in vivo exist as part of complex 3D structures and experience a much softer mechanical environment. It is well established in other cell types that altering substrate stiffness or growing cells in 3D exerts potent effects on phenotype and function. These factors may be especially relevant to the study of ASM function in asthma, a disease characterized by structural remodeling of the airway wall and a stiffer microenvironment experienced by ASM.

In this seminar, two key research projects will be presented to demonstrate the importance of the mechanical environment on in vitro ASM function: 1) use of a polyacrylamide hydrogel model used to alter substrate stiffness, and 2) the development and characterisation of a physiologically relevant 3D ‘microtissue’ culture model that allows for in vitro contractile force measurement, and shows great promise to simulate the biomechanical changes associated with asthma.

The Speaker: Adrian West’s scientific career was born and raised at the University of Western Australia. He undertook his BSc, Honours and PhD in the Department of Physiology where he studied the molecular mechanisms of intestinal haem iron absorption under Dr Phillip Oates. A lucky opportunity allowed Adrian to switch fields for his first postdoc to work in Prof Howard Mitchell’s respiratory physiology laboratory. During this time, he studied the effects of dynamic mechanical strain on acute regulation of airway smooth muscle (ASM) force and developed an interest in bridging the gap between whole-organ and cell-level mechanical properties.

Realising that engineers get to play with the coolest toys, Adrian moved to Dalhousie University in Canada for his second postdoc to work with an upcoming biomedical engineer, Dr Geoffrey Maksym. In this current position he is using novel cell culture and tissue engineering techniques to study how chronic changes in the biomechanical environment regulate ASM dysfunction, and how this may contribute to the pathogenesis of asthma.

13:00 - EVENT - SIFE Information Session : Find out more about SIFE UWA and our latest projects Website | More Information
SIFE is a global network of university teams competing in over 40 countries, creating change in the lives of others through the positive power of business.

Being the 2012 National Australian Champions, SIFE UWA will be travelling to Washington D.C in September to represent Australia at the SIFE World Cup. SIFE UWA has projects in areas including financial literacy, environmental sustainability and economic development whilst simultaneously impacting communities across Australia and beyond.

Want to help make a difference and gain invaluable business experience?? SIFE UWA is looking for talented, switched-on students from a range of disciplines to help us make a difference.

If you are interested in getting involved, we would like to invite you to the SIFE UWA Information Session WHEN: 1pm, Tuesday 28th of August, 2012 WHERE: Law Lecture Room 1, G.31

For more information – please contact [email protected]
Thursday 30
16:00 - SEMINAR - CMCA Seminar Series: Tools to better understand soil phosphorus - a finite and scarce resource. More Information
Phosphorus - a non-renewable resource - is a key element in food production and maintaining sustainable ecosystems. Predictions suggest global P fertiliser production may peak around 2030’s and will be one third of that peak level by the end of the 21st century. This will have a major impact on agriculture, especially heavily fertilised low P sandy soils of Western Australia.

 September 2012
Tuesday 04
9:30 - WORKSHOP - Using Photoshop to Prepare Images for Theses or Publication More Information
This workshop is a “hands-on” computing exercise and is scheduled to be conducted in the Pharmacology Computing Laboratory (room G17, M block QEII). Class size is strictly limited to 40 participants. Until 5 pm Monday 27th August, priority will be given to those with a current CMCA registration after which participation will be open to all on a “first in” basis. The workshop is free to attend but registration is essential. Please contact CMCA admin ([email protected]) to register. Also note, if you register and then fail to attend the workshop, a $50 non-attendance fee may be levied.

13:30 - EVENT - Using Image J for Image Analysis of Microscope Images - An Introduction More Information
This workshop is a “hands-on” computing exercise and is scheduled to be conducted in the Pharmacology Computing Laboratory (room G17, M block QEII). Class size is strictly limited to 40 participants. Until 5 pm Monday 27th August, priority will be given to those with a current CMCA registration after which participation will be open to all on a “first in” basis. The workshop is free to attend but registration is essential. Please contact CMCA admin ([email protected]) to register. Also note, if you register and then fail to attend the workshop, a $50 non-attendance fee may be levied.
Wednesday 05
16:00 - SEMINAR - Epigenetic Basis of the Pathogenesis of Neonatal Chronic Lung Disease : School of Anatomy, Physiology & Human Biology Seminar Series More Information
The Speaker: Dr Albertine graduated magna cum laude in biology from Lawrence University, Appleton, Wisconsin, in 1975. He graduated with a doctoral degree in human anatomy from Loyola University of Chicago, Stritch School of Medicine, in 1979. He received postdoctoral training at the Cardiovascular Research Institute, University of California, San Francisco (1980-83).

He held faculty appointments at the University of South Florida, the University of Pennsylvania, and Thomas Jefferson University before joining the faculty at the University of Utah, in 1993. The same year he established the Pediatric Fellowship Core Curriculum and continues to lead this training program for all first-year fellows in pediatrics.

Dr Albertine’s research topic is acute and chronic lung disease, with emphasis on neonatal chronic lung disease. His research group created the preterm lamb model of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). BPD is the second most prominent pediatric disease in the United States, eclipsed only by pediatric asthma. His large-animal, physiological model is the only such model of BPD. His laboratory has been supported by NIH grants for over 30 years.

He has authored almost 150 peer-reviewed papers and nearly 100 non-peer-reviewed papers, editorials, chapters, and textbooks. He is a reviewer for more than two dozen basic science or clinical journals and is Editor-in-Chief of The Anatomical Record, the flagship journal of the American Association of Anatomists.

Dr Albertine also participates in the Federation of Pediatric Organizations (FOPO), as a member of the Child Health Working Group. The charge of this group is to provide national guidance on approaches to attract physicians-in-training to become academic pediatricians (pediatric scientists).
Tuesday 11
13:00 - SEMINAR - In vivo strategies for tissue engineering, from a beating heart to a beating drum : School of Anatomy, Physiology & Human Biology Seminar Series More Information
The Seminar: The field of tissue engineering has seen significant advances in materials and cell biology research over the last twenty years, but most development has been through ‘in vitro’ technologies. Translation of these methods to the clinic will require ‘in vivo’ methods to be advanced and this talk will consider recent progress in two applications: engineering beating heart muscle from stem cells and tissue engineering for rapid repair of tympanic membrane perforations.

The Speaker: Rod Dilley is Head of Molecular and Cellular Otolaryngology at Ear Science Institute Australia and Adjunct Associate Professor in School of Surgery at UWA. In 1986 he completed his PhD in Department of Anatomy and Human Biology at UWA on vascular biology of vein graft arterialisation, with John McGeachie as supervisor. Rod did postdoctoral research training at University of Washington in Seattle USA then at Baker Institute in Melbourne, working on cardiovascular growth in hypertension, diabetes and atherosclerosis. Since then his research on cardiovascular disease has come to include tissue engineering and applications for adult stem cells. At Melbourne University since 2004 he was Head of the Cardiac Tissue Engineering group at O’Brien Institute and Principal Scientist for the biotechnology company Australian Tissue Engineering Centre. In 2011 he returned to Perth where his new position also takes in regeneration and tissue engineering in the ear.
Wednesday 12
13:00 - SEMINAR - Research IHC tips, tricks and pitfalls : CELLCentral Seminar (School of Anatomy, Physiology & Human Biology) More Information
Research tissue poses a number of issues when it comes to immunohistochemistry. The tissue may be human or non-human in origin, but either way care needs to be taken to obtain robust and reproducible IHC results. During this seminar Jane will try to give you some of the information that you need to make your life easier when you’re dealing with research samples and also some of the tricks that she has learnt during her time as a lab manager of a multi-user research histology lab.

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