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Today's date is Wednesday, November 25, 2020
School of Agricultural and Resource Economics
 September 2019
Wednesday 04
13:00 - EVENT - Speak Out on Climate Change : Students and staff speak out on climate change More Information
Brief talks on the climate emergency and what you can do about it. Hear from climate scientists, Extinction Rebellion and others.

 October 2019
Tuesday 08
11:44 - EVENT - Agriculture 4.0 (The Future of Agriculture) : AGRI 4.0 2020 More Information
Thursday 24
12:00 - EVENT - Friends of the Grounds Plant Sale : October 24 and 25 between 12-2PM at The University of Western Australia's Taxonomic Gardens Website | More Information
Friends of the Grounds are holding a Plant Sale on October 24 and 25 between 12-2PM at The University of Western Australia's Taxonomic Gardens (near the Botany glass houses)! Location map: https://bit.ly/2XORLsP 🌷

As usual, there will be plenty of awesome plant finds (herbs, succulents etc) ranging from $3-5 each 🌿 This sale is CASH ONLY and open to staff, students and the public. Please bring a carry bag, trolley or cardboard box to carry your new plant friends home 📦

All proceeds will go towards the maintenance of UWA's grounds!

 November 2019
Wednesday 27
13:00 - SEMINAR - Heat Therapy: An ancient practice to target modern diseases : School of Human Sciences, Seminar Series Website | More Information
Presentation Summary:Chronic heat exposure, in the form of saunas, hot water baths, and sweat lodges have been utilized in many cultures for thousands of years. While repetitive bouts of heat exposure is generally believed to be healthy, it is only recently that we are beginning to understand the full benefits of ‘heat therapy’ across the spectrum of human health. Passive heating results in a rise in body temperature and changes in cardiovascular hemodynamics, including altered shear patterns of blood flow. There is growing evidence that these responses to acute heat stress combine over repetitive sessions to provide a stress-resistant profile to counter inflammation and oxidative stress, as occurs with aging and chronic disease, as well as from acute damaging events such as ischemia-reperfusion injury. There is also growing evidence heat therapy can be used to target metabolic dysfunction in obesity and diabetes through improvements in insulin signaling in fat and muscle cells. This ancient therapy needs broader application to treat modern diseases, particularly in those not able to obtain the full benefits of exercise. Speaker Biography:Dr. Christopher Minson is the Kenneth and Kenda Singer Professor of Human Physiology. His research focuses on topics related to integrative cardiovascular physiology in humans. His lab investigates how we can use exposures to extreme environments to gain a healthy and resilient physiology. He is also involved in projects related to endocrine function in women, biomarkers of aging and the risk of cardiovascular and metabolic diseases, and finding novel ways to improve thermal comfort and safely in work environments. He also works with elite athletes in the use of environmental stressors to improve performance.

 February 2020
Saturday 01
9:30 - TUTORIAL - Read with Speed - back by popular demand : Double your reading speed and improve your comprehension Website | More Information
Learn how to quickly process the large amount of written information we all deal with daily in our business activities or academic studies. You will be provided with the skills to increase your reading speed significantly as well as improve your comprehension and memory. Students completing this course learn how the reading process works and understand how our brains process, store and retrieve information. They learn new techniques and practise these skills. The combination of knowledge, skills and practice enables students to develop into efficient readers.

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