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Today's date is Monday, November 30, 2020
Faculty of Architecture, Landscape and Visual Arts
 May 2019
Tuesday 14
18:00 - PUBLIC TALK - Venice and the Ottomans: a visual artistic journey between the Serenissima and Istanbul : Celebrating the 90th Anniversary of Italian Studies at UWA Website | More Information
A public talk by Dr Stefano Carboni, Director, Art Gallery of Western Australia.

The celebrated Venetian painter Gentile Bellini was sent by the Serenissima Republic to spend two years at the court of Mehmet II the Conqueror in Istanbul in 1479. This important moment in the cultural and artistic relationship between Venice and the Ottomans ushered in an Orientalist phase in Venetian painting and also inspired Turkish artists to portray Ottoman courtly figures in the “European” manner. No other city or European power from the Medieval and Renaissance periods can claim the complex and mutual closeness to the Islamic world that Venice enjoyed for many centuries. Progressively losing control over the Mediterranean waters that were to become the “Ottoman lake” and becoming sidelined by the new profitable transoceanic trade routes, Venice eventually became more closely aligned with the other European powers, losing her unique connection with the southern and eastern Mediterranean countries. The 15th and 16th centuries, therefore, represent a true “moment of vision” in the fecund relationship between two distant cultures.

2019 marks the 90th anniversary of the teaching of Italian language and culture at The University of Western Australia. In 1929, Francesco Vanzetti, an idiosyncratic and popular Venetian, offered the first courses in Italian. This was the first appointment of a lecturer in Italian in any Australian university. This lecture series, supported by the Institute of Advanced Studies and by Italian Studies in the UWA School of Humanities, celebrates aspects of Italian language and culture, past and present.
Wednesday 22
18:00 - PUBLIC TALK - Great Impressions – Rembrandt and the History of Printmaking More Information
A public lecture by Dr Susanne Meurer, School of Design (History of Art), UWA.

Rembrandt features amongst a select group of artists whose work proved influential across various media. He was never “just” a great painter, but also a prolific and innovative printmaker. Over four decades, he produced almost 300 etchings, many of which pushed the technical and expressive boundaries of printmaking. Above all, this lecture will argue, Rembrandt lent a new level of intimacy to the medium. By treating the printing plate like a sketch book, Rembrandt granted unparalleled insights into his working processes. The resulting prints defied their status as multiples and left a lasting impression not only on collectors, but also on generations of artists.

Rembrandt – 350th Anniversary Lecture Series

Rembrandt’s death took place 350 years ago this year, in 1669. Museums across the globe, from Amsterdam to the Arabian Gulf, are staging exhibitions to commemorate his artistic legacy, and a life that was far from a masterpiece. Sometimes dismissed contemptuously in his own time, the supreme genius of Rembrandt is now universally acknowledged. The Institute of Advanced Studies at The University of Western Australia is pleased to present a series of lectures offering insights into the artist’s life, his work and its reception.

 June 2019
Tuesday 18
18:00 - PUBLIC TALK - Missing Magnificence: tracing Catherine de Medici’s hidden cultural legacy : Celebrating the 90th Anniversary of Italian Studies at UWA Website | More Information
A public talk by Professor Susan Broomhall, History, UWA.

2019 is also the 500th anniversary of the birth of Catherine de Medici. As queen consort, regent and queen mother, Catherine dominated sixteenth-century French political life. Embracing her Medici heritage, her cultural projects, from palaces and artworks, to ceramics and exotica, were widely reported (and critiqued) in her lifetime. But where can we see it today? This lecture explores Catherine's extensive cultural patronage and its legacy in Europe today, often hiding in plain sight.

2019 marks the 90th anniversary of the teaching of Italian language and culture at The University of Western Australia. In 1929, Francesco Vanzetti, an idiosyncratic and popular Venetian, offered the first courses in Italian. This was the first appointment of a lecturer in Italian in any Australian university. This lecture series, supported by the Institute of Advanced Studies and by Italian Studies in the UWA School of Humanities, celebrates aspects of Italian language and culture, past and present.
Wednesday 19
18:00 - PUBLIC TALK - The Global Rembrandt Website | More Information
A public lecture by Arvi Wattel, School of Design (History of Art), UWA.

A recurring image of Rembrandt is that of the solitary painter, retreating ever further into the privacy of his studio over the course of his career. Yet, the opposite could be said as well: Rembrandt was thoroughly connected to the social world of his time through patronage and his role as a teacher. There is one aspect of his social world, however, that remains under-emphasised – the artist’s engagement with global cultures. In the seventeenth century, Amsterdam - the city in which Rembrandt lived and worked - became increasingly more global: products from all over the world were available in shops and the population of the city changed significantly. This lecture explores Rembrandt's response to the ever-changing world around him.

Rembrandt’s death took place 350 years ago this year, in 1669. Museums across the globe, from Amsterdam to the Arabian Gulf, are staging exhibitions to commemorate his artistic legacy, and a life that was far from a masterpiece.

Sometimes dismissed contemptuously in his own time, the supreme genius of Rembrandt is now universally acknowledged. The Institute of Advanced Studies at The University of Western Australia is pleased to present a series of lectures offering insights into the artist’s life, his work and its reception.

 July 2019
Wednesday 24
18:00 - PUBLIC TALK - Finding Rembrandt in Love and Life Website | More Information
A public lecture by Dr Susan Broomhall, School of Humanities (History), UWA.

This lecture explores how the character of Rembrandt van Rijn is interpreted through place, gender and emotions in museums and heritage sites in the Netherlands today. It focuses on the cities of Leiden and Amsterdam, Rembrandt’s homes, and particularly, the role of women in shaping interpretations of Rembrandt’s life and work. Historical women in Rembrandt's life are increasingly employed as tools to understand the artist's mind in creative responses such as Peter Greenaway's 2006 film 'Nightwatching' or the 2009 Australian opera by Andrew Ford and Sue Smith, 'Rembrandt's Wife'. This lecture investigates how heritage sites have likewise co-opted Rembrandt's relationships with women, in a range of ways, in order to increase visitor engagement.

Rembrandt’s death took place 350 years ago this year, in 1669. Museums across the globe, from Amsterdam to the Arabian Gulf, are staging exhibitions to commemorate his artistic legacy, and a life that was far from a masterpiece. Sometimes dismissed contemptuously in his own time, the supreme genius of Rembrandt is now universally acknowledged. The Institute of Advanced Studies at The University of Western Australia is pleased to present a series of lectures offering insights into the artist’s life, his work and its reception.

 August 2019
Wednesday 28
18:00 - PUBLIC TALK - Critical Care. Architecture and Urbanism for a Broken Planet Website | More Information
A public lecture by Elke Krasny, Professor for Art and Education, Academy of Fine Arts Vienna.

In medical terms critical care, also known as intensive care, is a specialized branch of medicine dedicated to diagnosing and treating life-threatening conditions. For this lecture, this term is borrowed to address the planet’s life-threatening condition. Throughout the twenty-first century the condition of the planet has made headlines. The news is not good. The diagnosis is bleak. We have come to understand that the Anthropocene-Capitalocene is straining the planet to its breaking point. The planet we live on and we live with is exhausted, drained, depleted, damaged, broken. Therefore, the planet is urgently in need of critical care to repair livability and inhabitability and to restore its condition for its continued existence in the future.

Architecture and urbanism are at the heart of the modern project of capitalism. Modernist aspirations in architecture were based on the powerful promise of building a better future. Today, we live in the ruins of this promise. This lecture asks in what ways architecture and urbanism starting from the given interdependence of economy, ecology, and labor, can contribute to such critical care taking, acknowledging that there is no promise of a better future, but much rather a process of permanent repair. Following Joan Tronto’s political notion of care as everything we do to maintain and repair ourselves and our environment, the chosen examples in architecture and urbanism provide evidence that through a perspective of care social and environmental justice are not mutually exclusive.

Elke Krasny is Professor for Art and Education at the Academy of Fine Arts Vienna. She is a cultural theorist, urban researcher, and curator. Her scholarship and her curatorial work focus on critical practices in architecture, urbanism, and contemporary art addressing the interconnectedness of ecology, economy, labor, memory, and feminisms.

 November 2019
Friday 22
13:00 - TALK - Friday Talk: Stilling Life - The Self-Portrait as a Vase with Flowers Website | More Information
How do artists negotiate objectivity and subjectivity when representing the self? Join art historian Emily Brink for this talk examining the connection between self-portraiture and still-life, with an emphasis on the work of artist A.M.E. Bale (1875-1955). Emily Brink is an Assistant Professor in the History of Art at the University of Western Australia. Her research focuses on eighteenth and nineteenth-century art, with an emphasis on identity, globalization, and cross-cultural exchange. UWA Campus Partner: School of Design
Saturday 23
9:30 - EVENT - Creative Travel Photography : Learn from Master Photographer and National Geographic finalist Website | More Information
Everybody who travels wants to return with stunning memories of the people and places they have experienced. Learn how to capture great travel images with one of Australia’s top travel and photo tours photographers, Nick Melidonis and ensure the time you spend on travel is reflected in high impact photography. This inspiring and fun course is for those wanting to record their personal journeys and capturing powerful images of people and landscapes to share with friends and family or for books, prints and exhibitions. Nick Melidonis is one of Australia’s foremost photographers and photo educators for over two decades. A Master Photographer with five gold bars; he was named number two in the world in 2016 in ‘Nature’ (landscape and wildlife) in the prestigious World Photographic Cup winning a silver medal. He was also a finalist in the National Geographic 2016 'Travel Photographer of the Year'. Nick is one of only three photographers to have won the 8’AIPP Australian Landscape Photographer of the Year' three times.

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