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SEMINAR: SCHOOL OF SOCIAL SCIENCES: ANTHROPOLOGY & SOCIOLOGY SEMINAR SERIES, SEMESTER 2, 2019

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Today's date is Thursday, October 01, 2020
SCHOOL OF SOCIAL SCIENCES: ANTHROPOLOGY & SOCIOLOGY SEMINAR SERIES, SEMESTER 2, 2019 Other events...
The Indonesian Diaspora across the Celebes Sea: Citizenship, Negotiation and Identity

This research focuses on the dynamics of the Indonesian diaspora whose members have been living for generations in the southern Philippines. While previously considered as stateless, these people have been officially recognised as (new) Indonesian citizens since December 2017. This study’s importance stems from this being the first time that the Indonesian government granted citizenship to a subpopulation in its diaspora. Research will take place in Davao City, General Santos City and Balut Island in the Philippines as the main locations of the Indonesian diaspora. This study is a qualitative research project that uses in-depth interviews, participant observation, and focus group discussions (FGDs) for data collection, in addition to desktop research.

Amorisa Wiratri is a PhD candidate in Anthropology and Sociology.

Being international? –an ethnographic study of Chinese international students’ academic and social experiences in an Australian university

With the increasing number of international students seeking education abroad, student mobility has become one of the key drives toward internationalization in higher education. Accounting for one-third of total international students in Australia universities, Chinese international students play a crucial role in the economy of Australia and the financial sustainability of Australian universities. Therefore, this study will benefit universities seeking to maximize students’ experiences and governing bodies on developing policies towards international students. So far, universities are offering programs and opportunities for student support. However, the gap between international students’ needs and institutional provisions can be significant. This project intends to better understand experiences of international students and different ways international students seek support and improve self-efficacy in a foreign environment. This research will centre on the lived experiences of Chinese international students in The University of Western Australia (UWA), using qualitative research methods, including participant observation, interviews, focus group discussions, video recording, and research diary, as well as thematic analysis. I also want to question integration theory which tends to dominate popular accounts of international student life as it is viewed by universities as the most ideal and valuable model after 1970s when “pluralism” paid more attention to “ethnic maintenance” instead of “assimilation”. Mingxin Qu is a PhD student in the Anthropology and Sociology Discipline. Her research interests include student mobility, education and new media.

Following Inclusion: A study of dyslexia, schools and policy enactment

Through the lens of inclusive education, this project will examine the educational experiences of dyslexic students and their families, asking questions about the levels of inclusion and exclusion they face. In Australia, inclusive education policies (IEP) mandate that mainstream schools must support the diverse needs of all students. Although extensive research has been carried out on inclusive education, no previous Australian study has investigated dyslexic students and their parents’ experiences in light of the emergence of IEP. The study will address the following set of questions:

1) How do dyslexic students experience their education, and what do the participants’ experiences reveal about A) How IEP are enacted in schools B) The potential of IEP to enhance the inclusion of dyslexics?

2) How have inclusive education policies developed in Australia?

In this project, I will follow a select group of up to 18 students diagnosed as dyslexic and their parents/guardians through the course of the 2020 school year. Postulating that students with a Higher Education Family Tradition (HEFT) are more likely to seek and gain support in accommodating their disability, the study aims at equal distribution of HEFT and non-HEFT students. I will also consider differences between metropolitan and rural students by recruiting up to 6 students from families living outside of Greater Perth. This study design will allow me to document and analyse the experiences of a variety of students in different school settings. Through this process, I will develop a clear sense of how certain schools across the state are responding to student needs. This project aims to contribute significantly to the small body of qualitative research on dyslexia by presenting an in-depth analysis of how dyslexics and their families, in different school contexts and from different educational backgrounds, experience and respond to the promise and the enactment of inclusive education policies.

Thom Nevill is a PhD candidate in Anthropology and Sociology.
Speaker(s) Amorisa Wiratri ,Mingxin Qu &Thom Nevill
Location Social Sciences Building Room 2204
Contact Farida Fozdar <[email protected]>
Start Fri, 20 Sep 2019 14:30
End Fri, 20 Sep 2019 16:00
Submitted by Karen Eichorn <[email protected]>
Last Updated Mon, 16 Sep 2019 12:01
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