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EVENT: The objectified self(ie) – young women’s use of Facebook and The orientation dependence of a motion streak aftereffect reveals reciprocal gain interactions between orientation and motion neurons

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Today's date is Friday, October 23, 2020
The objectified self(ie) – young women’s use of Facebook and The orientation dependence of a motion streak aftereffect reveals reciprocal gain interactions between orientation and motion neurons Other events...
Two talks will be presented that have recently been given at the Society of Australasian Social Psychologists and the Australasian Society for Experimental Psychology conferences respectively.

Abstract 1: Recent years have seen the ‘selfie’ become ubiquitous. The act of taking a photo of oneself and uploading to a social media platform, such as Facebook, is an act that can now be considered commonplace. This research examines the selfie phenomenon amongst young women through the lens of objectification theory. Objectification theory posits that social and cultural influences are internalised by the individual and then reproduced within one’s self-identity via self-objectification. The production of a Facebook profile, and the composition of a selfie, could be suggested to represent the process of reproducing social and cultural influences. Hypotheses include that the posting of selfies on Facebook will be associated with self-esteem, body esteem, the internalisation of socio-cultural ideals, drive for thinness, and the acceptance of sex role stereotypes. The results from this research confirm these hypotheses. Possible conclusions and future directions for research are discussed.

Abstract 2: The extended integration time of neurons leads to fast-moving objects leaving neural cues to pattern orientation along the axis of motion. The current model argues these ‘motion streak’ orientation cues are multiplicatively combined in V1 with directionally ambiguous motion signals, to increase the precision of the motion direction. We used a combination of psychophysical aftereffects and computational modelling to estimate the tuning of the motion streak mechanism. We surprisingly found that tuning was more than double that for static orientation, suggesting motion streaks are not treated exactly like orientation information. Furthermore, the direction that motion is altered by adaptation is spatial frequency dependent, unlike static orientation, which is selective for spatial frequency. We provide a new model showing motion streaks are detected by orientation-selective neurons in V1 that exert gain onto motion-selective neurons in V5. The involvement of V5 results in the observed broad tuning and dependence on spatial frequency.
Speaker(s) Regan S Housley and Matthew F. Tang
Location The University of Western Australia, Bayliss Lecture Theatre, Chemistry, G33
Contact David Badcock <[email protected]> : 64883267
Start Tue, 20 May 2014 13:00
End Tue, 20 May 2014 13:45
Submitted by Admin Psy <[email protected]>
Last Updated Tue, 10 Feb 2015 15:42
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