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VISITING SPEAKER: New horizons in plant mitochondria group-II intron splicing

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New horizons in plant mitochondria group-II intron splicing : In plants, transcription of mitochondrial genes is catalyzed by single subunit phage-type RNA-polymerases in conjunction with accessory factors which aid promoter recognition. Other events...
The primary transcripts must then undergo extensive processing, including the maturation of 5í and 3í termini, RNA-editing and the splicing of many group-II-type introns (the precise number varying by species), which lie mainly within complex I subunits but also disrupt the coding-regions of several genes encoding ribosomal proteins. The splicing of these introns is therefore essential for the expression of the coding sequences they interrupt, and thus for respiratory activity. Yet, despite the importance of proteins that influence mitochondrial gene-expression, functions have been established for only a handful of such proteins in plants. In non-plant systems, the splicing of group-II introns is facilitated by proteins encoded within the introns themselves (Maturases, Matís). Yet, the plant mitochondrial introns are degenerated and also lost their intron-encoded ORF. It is thus anticipated that their splicing in the organelles requires the participation of nuclear gene products. In addition, the roles of nuclear-encoded factors in mitochondrial RNA-metabolism may provide means to link organellar gene expression and function to other cellular responses to energy state, environmental stimuli, and/or developmental cues. However, the precise functions still remain largely unknown for many of these proteins in plant mitochondria. By using biochemical and genetic approaches we established the roles of different proteins in the splicing of many of the mitochondrial introns in plants. These are diverse in origin and presumably in mechanism. Defects in interactions between this class of proteins and their RNA partners have been linked to growth and developmental defects, which include reduced germination, retarded growth phenotypes and cytoplasmic male sterility.
Speaker(s) Dr Oren Ostersetzer-Biran, Inst Plant Sciences, Agricultural Research Organization, Volcani Center, Israel
Location G.33 Lecture Theatre, Bayliss Bldg., UWA
Contact Jennifer Gillett <[email protected]> : 6488 4416
Start Thu, 21 Jun 2012 16:00
End Thu, 21 Jun 2012 16:45
RSVP RSVP is required.
Submitted by Jennifer Gillett <[email protected]>
Last Updated Mon, 11 Jun 2012 08:32
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