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Today's date is Thursday, April 02, 2020
School of Molecular Sciences
 July 2019
Thursday 25
12:00 - SEMINAR - Bayliss Seminar Series More Information
Microbes and transition metals: insights into manganese and gold biogeochemical cycling

12:00 - SEMINAR - Bayliss Seminar Series : Microbes and transition metals: insights into manganese and gold biogeochemical cycling More Information
Tuesday 30
12:00 - SEMINAR - Multimodal Preclinical Imaging- High Frequency Ultrasound and Photoacoustic Imaging : Applications of High Frequency Ultrasound and Photoacoustic Imaging- Now available at the Centre for Microscopy, Characterisation and Analysis More Information
Applications of High Frequency Ultrasound and Photoacoustic Imaging in small animals- Cardiovascular Imaging & Analysis, Cancer Imaging, Kidney, Liver & Other Abdominal Organs, Reproductive, Embryo & Neonate Imaging, Ophthalmic Imaging, Image-Guided Needle Injections, Microvascular Perfusion with Contrast Agents,Molecular Imaging Techniques.

 August 2019
Friday 02
12:00 - SEMINAR - Bayliss Seminar Series : Mechanism and Application of Microbial Extracellular Electron Uptake Process More Information
Mechanism and Application of Microbial Extracellular Electron Uptake Process
Thursday 08
12:00 - SEMINAR - Bayliss Seminar Series More Information
X-ray diffraction and scattering at Curtin University: Big stuff, small stuff, hot stuff, cold stuff
Thursday 15
12:00 - CANCELLED - SEMINAR - Bayliss Seminar Series More Information
Unfortunately this event has been cancelled.

THIS SEMINAR HAS BEEN CANCELLED

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Molecular Phenotyping in Precision and Preventive Medicine
Friday 16
14:00 - SEMINAR - Bayliss Seminar Series : Dr Alastair Stewart, Laboratory Head, The Victor Chang Cardiac Research Institute, Sydney More Information
“Cryo-EM studies of E. coli F1Fo ATP synthase”
Monday 19
14:00 - SEMINAR - Bayliss Seminar Series : Prof. Dr Albrecht Berkessel More Information
Catalytic synthesis with titanium and Carbenes
Thursday 22
12:00 - SEMINAR - Bayliss Seminar Series : Tracey McClurg - APR Intern business development manager More Information
APR Intern connects Australia’s biggest problem solvers from a range of disciplines, enhancing the PhD experience of students by giving them the opportunity to apply their research skills within an industry context.

Friday 23
12:00 - SEMINAR - Bayliss Seminar Series : Dr. Helen Maynard-Casely - Senior Instrument Scientist, Australian Centre for Neutron Scattering More Information
Exploring the materials of the solar system with Australia’s central facilities
Wednesday 28
11:00 - SEMINAR - Bayliss Seminar Series : Latest advances in nanoscale IR spectroscopy and imaging More Information
Latest advances in nanoscale IR spectroscopy and imaging
Friday 30
12:00 - SEMINAR - Bayliss Seminar Series : A/Prof Jialing Bao - Southwest University/WESTA College - China More Information
Association of ideas about Cellular Biochemistry, Inflammation and Microsporidia

 September 2019
Tuesday 03
13:00 - SEMINAR - School of Human Sciences Seminar Series : Age-related pathway signatures – relevance for treating ageing disorders Website | More Information
Abstract: Ageing occurs in a regulated manner and the associated gene expression changes could contribute to the onset of many diseases, either by creating a permissive environment for pathology, or by directly inducing these conditions. We identified an Age-related Gene Expression Signature (AGES) in rats, by studying a time course of gene expression throughout the lifespan of the animal. Examining multiple tissues in rats aged 6, 9, 12, 18, 21, 24 and 27 months, we demonstrated tissue-specific and common gene pathway changes. Since AGES were shared by multiple tissues, it is plausible that perturbation of a discrete cell signalling pathway can extend life span and delay age-related diseases. We next asked, what is the impact of clinically-relevant low doses of rapalog on age-related pathway changes? Rapamycin or rapalogs (e.g. RAD001) that are inhibitors of mTORC1 (mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1), have been shown to increase lifespan and forestall age-related phenotypes in multiple species, including humans. Interestingly, the effect of RAD001 on age-related gene pathways was more pronounced in kidneys compared with other examined tissues (liver, skeletal muscle and hippocampus). The majority of the age-related pathways in the kidney were counter-regulated by a low dose of RAD001, and this was accompanied by reduction of age-related renal histopathology. We also examined the impact of RAD001 on molecular pathways implicated in skeletal muscle ageing (sarcopenia). This partial inhibition of the mTORC1 pathway counteracted age-related changes in expression of several genes related to senescence, muscle atrophy and deterioration of neuromuscular junctions, plus prevented loss of muscle mass for select muscles. These studies emphasise the potential benefit of drugs that target global signalling pathways as a successful strategy to reduce the adverse consequences of ageing.
Wednesday 04
14:00 - SEMINAR - School of Human Sciences Seminar Series : Cancer associated fibroblast mediated remodelling of the extracellular matrix as a driver of tumour progression and metastasis Website | More Information
Abstract: Homeostasis of the extracellular matrix (ECM) is critical for correct organ and tissue function. It plays a critical role in normal tissue homeostasis and pathological disease progression. Both the biochemical and biomechanical properties of the ECM contribute to modulating the behaviour of resident cells and are more than just passive bystanders. In tissue diseases such as cancer, the ECM undergoes significant change. These changes, driven by both tumour and stromal cells, feed into the progression of the disease. As such, changes in the ECM mark significant transition events in disease progression. Understanding how the changing ECM facilitates tumour progression and metastasis is an important step in the development of new therapeutic approaches for the treatment of cancer.
Friday 20
12:00 - SEMINAR - Bayliss Seminar Series : Dr. Philipp Bayer - Eukaryotic pangenomics – where we’ve been, where we’re going. More Information
Dr. Philipp Bayer - Eukaryotic pangenomics – where we’ve been, where we’re going.
Tuesday 24
13:00 - FREE LECTURE - Special Guest Lectures and Panel Discussion : Inactivity, Exercise and Cardiovascular System Website | More Information
"Vascular effects of physical (in)activity and insulin resistance: Mechanisms and implications" - Dr. Jaume Padilla is currently an Associate Professor in the Department of Nutrition and Exercise Physiology and investigator at the Dalton Cardiovascular Research Center at the University of Missouri. His laboratory focuses on understanding the physiological and molecular mechanisms by which inactivity, obesity, and type 2 diabetes lead to an increased risk for vascular dysfunction and disease. Dr. Padilla’s research is integrative and incorporates in vitro cell and tissue culture models and studies in mice, pigs, and human patients, thus highlighting the translational nature of his work. His seminar will summarize some of his recent work related to mechanisms contributing to vascular insulin resistance and dysfunction in obesity and type 2 diabetes as well as describe the deleterious vascular consequences of excess inactivity and sitting.

"Training your arteries, vascular function with exercise training in healthy and clinical populations" - Maureen J MacDonald received her Honours BSc in Chemistry from Acadia University, Canada, in 1991 and her MSc (1993) and PhD (1998) in Kinesiology from the University of Waterloo, Canada. After post-doctoral research fellowships at the University of British Columbia and the University of Western Ontario she started her academic career as a faculty member at Wilfrid Laurier University. Since 2000 she has been a faculty member in the Department of Kinesiology at McMaster University, Hamilton, Canada, where she is a full professor and is the Dean of Science. Dr. MacDonald the director of the Vascular Dynamics Laboratory and is an active member of the Exercise Metabolism Research Group in the Department of Kinesiology at McMaster. Her research interests are in the area of exercise physiology with specialization in the application of ultrasound techniques to the assessment of the peripheral blood vessels. Most recently, together with her research team, she has been examining the impact of high intensity interval training on the blood vessels and heart in individuals with coronary artery disease and the use of heat therapy as an alternative to exercise training. She has directly supervised over 100 undergraduate and graduate students since her appointment in 2000 and was recently awarded the Canadian Society for Exercise Physiology Mentorship award in October 2018. Dr. MacDonald has been continually funded by The Natural Sciences and Engineering Council of Canada since 2001, and currently is also funded by Canadian Institutes for Health Research and the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada. Dr. MacDonald is a member of the Canadian Society for Exercise Physiology, the American College of Sports Medicine, the American Physiological Society and the European College of Sports Science and. Two research leaves at Stanford University (July 2006-June 2007) and Loughborough University (July 2013-June 2014) provided Dr. MacDonald with international academic exposure and fostered lasting international research collaborations. She teaches a weekly high intensity interval training spinning class in the McMaster Fitness Facility and spends most of her free time at the arena watching her boys play hockey.

Panel Discussion 2:00-2:30 with Professor David Dunstan PhD David is Head of the Physical Activity laboratory at the Baker Heart and Diabetes Institute in Melbourne and is an NHMRC Senior Research Fellow and Baker Fellow. He also holds the position of Professor within the Behaviour, Environment and Cognition Research Program at the Mary MacKillop Institute for Health Research, Australian Catholic University. His research program encompasses the interdisciplinary cross-talk and integration of observational, experimental, mechanistic and intervention evidence on the role of sedentary behaviour and physical activity in the prevention and management of chronic diseases. He has published over 260 peer reviewed papers and in 2018 was included in the Clarivate list of the 1% of the most highly cited researchers globally. Over the past 15 years David has had extensive media interest in his research including interviews with National Public Radio, Wall Street Journal, CNN, The Economist, New Scientist, the New York Times and the LA Times.
Wednesday 25
13:00 - SEMINAR - Using genes to assess social structure in the Boodies of Barrow Island : School of Human Sciences Seminar Series Website | More Information
The Boodie or Burrowing Bettong (Bettongia lesueur) is the only macropod that shelters underground in warrens. It is limited naturally to three islands off the west Australian coast, but just 200 years ago it had the widest distribution of any macropod, occupying about 50% of the continent. The seminar will describe what can be eked out of a genetic analysis of the population on Barrow Island, which is at the geographic centre of Australia's largest resource project. Inevitably, it will be short. However, that masks the huge effort required to undertake work of this kind. It was largely undertaken by others, and Felicity Donaldson and Celeste Wale deserve special mention in this regard.
Thursday 26
12:00 - SEMINAR - Bayliss Seminar Series : Dr Susanne Gebhard - Flux-sensing by transporter/kinase pairs - need-based activation of antibiotic resistance More Information
Friday 27
12:00 - SEMINAR - Bayliss Seminar Series : Associate Professor David Huang More Information
High-throughput screening of porous functional materials

 October 2019
Friday 04
11:00 - SEMINAR - Bayliss Seminar Series : James Walshe - Structural Characterisation of an ANTAR Domain Anti-Terminator Protein Bound to RNA More Information

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