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Today's date is Saturday, March 28, 2020
Events for the public
 March 2020
Monday 09
18:00 - PUBLIC TALK - When Animals Talk Back. Perspectives on human-animal communication. Website | More Information
A public lecture by Don Kulick, Distinguished University Professor of Anthropology, Uppsala University, Sweden and 2020 UWA Institute of Advanced Studies Visiting Fellow.

The past two decades have seen a seismic shift in our understanding of what animals are, what they perceive and think, and what they are capable of. Biologists and ethologists who study animal behaviour have made vital contributions to this shift. However, a significant quantity of writing about animals comes from philosophers, humanities and social science scholars, as well as those working in professional sectors, including freelance animal trainers and behaviourists. What is behind this outpouring of interest in animals? And now that animals seem to have our collective ear, what exactly are they saying?

Don Kulick is Distinguished University Professor of Anthropology at Uppsala University, Sweden, where he directs the Engaging Vulnerability research program. He has published widely on sociolinguistics, gender and sexuality studies, disability studies, queer theory and animal studies. His most recent books are 'A Grammar and Dictionary of Tayap: the life and death of a Papuan language' (with Angela Terrill, Mouton de Gruyter), and 'A Death in the Rainforest: how a language and a way of life came to an end in Papua New Guinea' (Algonquin Books), both from last year.
Tuesday 10
7:30 - EVENT - Friends of the Library : "Why politics?" by Diana Warnock Website | More Information
Diana Warnock, a former newspaper and radio journalist, went into politics at the age of 52 when she was elected as the State member of Parliament for Perth in 1993. Before entering politics, Diana was an activist for about 30 years for women’s rights and for minorities, and always belonged to many community and voluntary groups, both locally in Perth and nationally. She grew up in the Eastern Goldfields—between Menzies and Leonora—but lived most of her adult life in the city of Perth. Her late husband Bill Warnock, an Irish-Scot, grew up in a Glasgow slum and migrated to Australia in his teens. They both graduated in arts from UWA.

Special Collections

James Hume Nisbet (1849-1923) Scottish born author and artist first visited Australia as a young man in the late 1860s. He visited Australia twice, travelling to Tasmania, New Zealand, and the South Sea Island, painting, sketching, writing poetry and stories. The Friends of the Library purchased four of Nisbet’s sketches currently on display in the foyer Special Collections 2nd Floor Reid Library until April. The display also includes many of his novels and poetry from the Peter Cowan Collection.

Special Collections will be open for Friends from 6.30pm prior to the talk to view the foyer display and objects from the collection in May, June, July, August and November 2020.

AGM The Committee invites members to nominate and join the Committee in 2020. Please contact Kathryn Maingard (email kathryn.maingard@uwa.edu.au or by phone 6488 2356) if you are interested in joining the Committee.

18:45 - FREE LECTURE - RACI Bayliss Youth Lecture 2020 : Shining a light on crime: Applications of spectroscopy to forensic science Website | More Information
Paint, cosmetics, ink. All of these can be forms of forensic evidence that can help detectives to make links between individuals, objects and locations – a critically important part of a criminal investigation. But how to get the most useful information from these types of evidence? This is where chemistry plays an essential role. Join Dr Georgina Sauzier as she explores a key tool of analytical chemistry and how it can be used for analysis of forensic evidence.

Tickets are free but you must register at https://www.eventbrite.com.au/e/raci-bayliss-lecture-2020-shining-a-light-on-crime-uwa-tickets-86459128581
Wednesday 11
18:00 - PUBLIC TALK - Interrogating an Ancient War on Terror: the persecution of the Christians reconsidered Website | More Information
A public lecture by Dr James Corke-Webster, Senior Lecturer, Roman History, King’s College London and 2020 UWA Institute of Advanced Studies Visiting Fellow.

This lecture will explore the persecution of the early Christians under the Roman Empire. This has always been remembered as a clash of ideologies – a war between the Roman state and its traditional gods on the one hand, and the new Christian cult and its upstart God on the other. But does our evidence really support that view? And if not, what might persecution look like?

This lecture looks to uncover not just how persecution was actually experienced in antiquity, but how it was (mis)remembered as well.

Dr James Corke-Webster is a Roman historian with particular interests in early Christian and late antique history and literature. He studied Classics and Theology at Oxford, Cambridge, and Manchester, before taking up a Fulbright Scholarship at Berkeley. He then held lectureships at Edinburgh and Durham before moving to Kings College in 2017. He is the author of 'Eusebius and Empire: Constructing Church and Rome in the Ecclesiastical History' (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2019).
Thursday 12
16:00 - SEMINAR - Swahili social landscapes: a case study from northern Zanzibar,1000-1400 CE More Information
Abstract

The large group of people commonly known as the Swahili occupied an expansive stretch of coastline between Somalia and Mozambique from the 6th and 7th centuries CE, with early villages being built with wattle and daub while later settlements also included stone structures such as tombs, mosques, and private houses. Increased involvement in long-distance trade, urbanisation, and religious developments led to a gradually more hierarchical social structure in many Swahili societies, which included forced labour and servitude. In this research seminar, I will present some of the results from two archaeological field seasons in Tumbatu and Mkokotoni in north-western Zanzibar (Unguja) in Tanzania, and their relationship to my larger doctoral project at Uppsala University titled: “Swahili Social Landscapes - Material expressions of slavery, labour, and non-elite identity in pre-colonial Zanzibar”. The results from surveys and household excavations at both sites reveal that the two sites were closely connected, partially relying on each other for food and trade commodities, while simultaneously operating within larger regional and international networks of trade and communication. Although long believed to be an elite stone town, the data from Tumbatu is showing a settlement highly reliant on its neighbours and questions the assumed dichotomy between elite and non-elite inhabitants.

Biographical information

Henriette Rødland is an archaeologist and PhD student at the Department of Archaeology and Ancient History at Uppsala University, Sweden, where she has also been teaching undergraduate and postgraduate classes on heritage, slavery, and urbanisation. She has also been a visiting teacher at the University of Pretoria, South Africa. She specialises in Swahili urban archaeology and the history and archaeology of slavery in East Africa, with a particular focus on the role of artefacts in reflecting, maintaining, and negotiating social identities and inequalities. Her research currently centres on northern Zanzibar, Tanzania, and two early second millennium urban sites that were well-connected to the Indian Ocean sphere of commerce. These relationships brought pottery, cloth, beads, and glass to East Africa, while timber, gold, ivory, and enslaved individuals were exported to other Indian Ocean ports. Henriette holds a BA from the University of York and an MA from the University of East Anglia (Sainsbury Research Unit), where her research focused on archaeological and historical approaches to slavery in West and East Africa.
Friday 13
11:00 - SEMINAR - Somatic Experiences of Ageing and Beauty Work Among Older Korean and Chinese Migrants More Information
Over the past decade, a growing number of sociological research has sought to understand the role of beauty work in promoting positive ageing among older people. However, majority of these studies have been conducted in the Western context, and only a limited number of studies have focused on older people of Asian ancestry. In the West, ageing has often been theorised as a negative challenge to individual’s identity and agency; however, in many East Asian countries old age has, at least up until very recently, been considered a sign of greater understanding of the world, and therefore ageing has been perceived as a process to be celebrated. This project will explore the ways in which older Korean and Chinese migrants living in Western Australia experience their ageing bodies specifically in the context of their engagement with everyday beauty work. Focusing on their lived experiences of ‘doing beauty’ and engaging with everyday beauty practices, this project will contribute to the current body of knowledge by providing a general understanding of how ageing bodies are perceived and experienced, particularly how beauty work and aesthetic care of self intersect with notions of wellbeing and positive ageing in later life in migrant contexts.

14:30 - SEMINAR - ‘Memoirs .. serve as excellent types’: C.R. Browne and the Ethnographical Survey of Ireland – Excluded Ancestor and Invisible Genealogy in the History of Anthropology More Information
Abstract

At various times in the 1890s and early 1900s the reports of Charles Robert Browne’s ethnographic studies undertaken in the West of Ireland were described as exemplary ethnography. Yet the Ethnographical Survey of Ireland on which Browne worked is largely forgotten in anthropology and if remembered, seen as only preliminary to the main business of AC Haddon’s anthropological career and a mere adjunct to the Ethnographic Survey of the United Kingdom. When it is discussed, typically only the initial work of Haddon and Browne on Aran is mentioned or the ongoing role of Haddon in the enterprise exaggerated.

In this paper I explore the anthropological career of Charles Robert Browne, the only person to list his occupation in the 1901 census of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland as ‘anthropologists’, albeit alongside his other profession: ‘general practitioner’. I argue, on the one hand, that the Ethnographical Survey of Ireland is part of an invisible genealogy in the development of modern professional anthropology, with Browne an excluded ancestor and, on the other, that the survey was part of an Imperial Science project that ultimately failed to take root in Ireland as the country moved to Independence.

Bio

Dr Edward M. McDonald is the principal of Ethnosciences (2003-present) and formerly Managing Director and principal anthropologist of McDonald, Hales and Associates (1988-2003).Dr McDonald is currently the President of the Anthropological Society of Western Australia (ASWA).

He has 44 years’ experience as an applied anthropologist. His areas of research include Aboriginal and youth homelessness and housing programs, service delivery and client processing in welfare organisations, evaluations of group foster care and day care and of work organisation in a heavy industrial setting, in addition to a major community study in Inner City Perth. Dr McDonald’s article on the ethnography of Indigenous archaeology will be published shortly in Cooney, Gilhooly, Kelly & Mallía-Guest (eds.) Cultures of Stone: An Interdisciplinary Approach to the Materiality of Stone. He has a continuing interest in the history of anthropology, with a primary focus on the ethnography of Daisy Bates and on the work Charles Robert Browne and the Ethnographic Survey of Ireland (1891-1903).
Monday 16
16:00 - CANCELLED - MASTERCLASS - UWA Conservatorium of Music presents David Kim Masterclass (Piano) More Information
Unfortunately this event has been cancelled.

In light of the recent developments around international visitors arriving in Australia, we have taken the sad decision to cancel David Kim’s activities at the Conservatorium this week.

We will continue to monitor the Department of Health alerts and provide any important updates around other events as soon as they are available.

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Masterclasses give students a unique opportunity to develop their skills and work closely with leading artists from around the world. Audiences, whether student, teacher or enthusiast are given a glimpse as to what happens before and behind the stage. Don’t miss seeing these renown artists working with emerging artists in an intimate setting.

David Kim (Piano) David Hyun-Su Kim has distinguished himself as one of the most thoughtful and distinctive musicians to emerge from the newest generation of American pianists.

Join David as he works with students from the UWA Piano Studio ahead of their Lunchtime Concert performances on Wednesday 18 March.

Free entry - no bookings required
Tuesday 17
8:00 - WORKSHOP - Static Liquefaction Workshop : This two-day workshop aims to provide a demonstration of static liquefaction triggering as it relates to tailings Website | More Information
This two-day workshop aims to provide a demonstration of static liquefaction triggering as it related to tailings, and outline the various tools available to assess the potential for this behaviour.

This will be achieved through explanation on the interpretation of the cone penetration test (CPT), laboratory techniques to refine CPT interpretation and provide inputs to other analyses, and finally analytical and numerical methods to assess static liquefaction susceptibility.

Mining and tailings consultants, operators of tailings storage facilities, as well as regulators will find this workshop of interest.

14:00 - SEMINAR - ‘Performing Bromance On and Offline: Hugh Jackman, Ryan Reynolds and Jake Gyllenhall’, Presented by Jackie Raphael More Information
ABSTRACT: Bromances in Hollywood have become an increasingly useful form of promotion. Hugh Jackman in particular has utilised this technique in the X-Men franchise and crossed over into Deadpool. His friendship with Ryan Reynolds has even intersected into the films, as well as social media and into Jackman’s theatre show. They have also taken it a step further by including Jake Gyllenhall, whom they have both worked with individually. Analysing these friendships, it is evident that they choose to perform their bromances publicly in order to promote their films and charities, but also to gain online attention and develop their individual brands further. Going viral and having the mass media speak about their social media posts, generates further publicity and strengthens their fun and engaging identities. However, it is reliant on perceived authenticity, ‘celebrity capital’ (Gunter 2014) and humour to stimulate audiences. Thus, the friendship between Jackman, Reynolds and Gyllenhall will be used as a case study to examine how viral campaigns intersect with the curation of digital persona, celebrity capital and perceived brand authenticity.

Dr Jackie Raphael has a PhD in Creative Advertising and Design from Curtin University, where she explored endorsements, branding and social media. Her current research examines media, popular culture, bromance as a promotional tool and persona. She has published several papers and books on these topics. Dr Raphael has lectured and tutored undergraduates in Design and Communication since 2010. She has coordinated a Masters course and various undergraduate units. Dr Raphael has also supervised Honours, Masters and PhD students. Her current role is Senior Learning Skills Officer in STUDYSmarter (UWA’s Academic Skills Centre) and Honorary Research Fellow in the School of Social Sciences.

17:00 - CANCELLED - PERFORMANCE - UWA Music presents: Callaway Centre Research Seminar Series : David Kim More Information
Unfortunately this event has been cancelled.

In light of the recent developments around international visitors arriving in Australia, we have taken the sad decision to cancel David Kim’s activities at the Conservatorium this week.

We will continue to monitor the Department of Health alerts and provide any important updates around other events as soon as they are available.

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The Conservatorium of Music is a vibrant centre for research in music and music education, where a thriving community of scholars is engaged in exploring the frontiers of knowledge, working on a wide range of research projects with diverse outputs.

Our free weekly seminar series showcases presenters from within UWA and from the wider community.

David Kim | Beethoven on Historical Instruments: Case Studies in Interpretation

“Historically-Informed Performance” is mostly obviously characterized by its use of historical instruments, and HIP players are instantly recognizable by their hardware: fortepianos rather than modern Steinways, gut rather than metal strings, etc. While musical hardware is inarguably central to HIP’s project, the consequences of HIP-based thinking reach far beyond instruments. Taking Beethoven’s 250th as our cue, we will use case studies from Beethoven’s compositions to illustrate that technology is inextricably interwoven with musical style and can even shed new light on familiar compositions. Perhaps more importantly, these case studies will also be used to offer freeing interpretive possibilities, and even fresh perspectives on what it means to be a musician.

Bio – David Hyun-su Kim is a concert pianist specializing in historical performance, holds degrees from Harvard, Yale, and Cornell Universities, a Doctorate from the New England Conservatory, and serves as Associate Professor of music at Whitman College.

In celebration of Beethoven’s 250th, he will be performing an all-Beethoven program on Thursday, March 19th at 7:30. Further details https://www.trybooking.comBHVTJ

Free entry - no booking required

18:00 - PUBLIC TALK - What Does Intelligent Mobility Add to Sustainability? *Cancelled* Website | More Information
The Inaugural John Taplin Memorial Lecture in Transport, by Professor David A. Hensher, PhD FASSA

Due to ongoing concerns about the development of the COVID-19 virus and the importance of reducing its spread, we have made the difficult decision to cancel this public lecture. We apologise for any disappointment, however we believe that this is the most responsible course of action at this time, as the health and wellbeing of our community take priority. We hope to reschedule this event at a later date and will be in contact with details when they are available.
Wednesday 18
13:00 - CANCELLED - PERFORMANCE - UWA Music presents: Free Lunchtime Concert | UWA Piano More Information
Unfortunately this event has been cancelled.

We understand that members of our community may be experiencing heightened concern for their health and wellbeing with the wider international spread of COVID-19.

Due to the rapidly developing COVID-19 situation and advice from the Government and Department of Health, upcoming Lunchtime Concerts have been cancelled.

The safety, health and wellbeing of our students, staff and UWA community will always remain our top priority.

For more information about COVID-19, visit health.gov.au; or for UWA-specific information, visit uwa.edu.au/coronavirus.

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Be transported from the everyday by our free lunchtime concert series, featuring the best musical talent from within the UWA Conservatorium of Music and around the country.

In this week's free Lunchtime Concert, students from the UWA Piano Studio will perform a range of works for solo piano, following their masterclass with visiting artist David Kim. The program will include works by Liszt, Chopin, Beethoven, Kapustin and Mendelssohn.

Free entry - no bookings required


14:00 - SEMINAR - A masterclass with Henriette Rødland, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Uppsala University, Sweden. More Information
Connecting three continents and spanning a vast network of coastlines, the Indian Ocean has been an arena for commerce and interaction for at least 2,000 years. An integral part of this interaction was the movement of people, both voluntary and involuntary, or something in-between. Labourers, merchants, indentured and enslaved individuals moved (or were moved) between settlements, regions, and coasts, leading to a wide dispersal of commodities, languages, and ideologies. These events have left tangible remains in the form of texts, artefacts, and architecture, as well as intangible traces embedded in religion, culture, and customs, many of which can still be observed today. This masterclass will focus on the ways in which these labour histories and their impact within the Indian Ocean can be studied through a variety of disciplines, including history, archaeology, and heritage management, and why it is important to understand the movement of people in the past. The history of slavery in the Indian Ocean is particularly interesting yet understudied, and the way in which this history is remembered varies greatly depending on specific cultural and political factors. In this masterclass, the Indian Ocean will offer a comparative lens through which we can understand these different factors. It aims to discuss and problematise the role of researchers in the history and heritage of slavery, and how it is remembered, studied, and communicated.

About the Speaker:

Henriette Rødland is an archaeologist and PhD student at the Department of Archaeology and Ancient History at Uppsala University, Sweden, where she has also been teaching undergraduate and postgraduate classes on heritage, slavery, and urbanisation. She has also been a visiting teacher at the University of Pretoria, South Africa. She specialises in Swahili urban archaeology and the history and archaeology of slavery in East Africa, with a particular focus on the role of artefacts in reflecting, maintaining, and negotiating social identities and inequalities. Her research currently centres on northern Zanzibar, Tanzania, and two early second millennium urban sites that were wellconnected to the Indian Ocean sphere of commerce. These relationships brought pottery, cloth, beads, and glass to East Africa, while timber, gold, ivory, and enslaved individuals were exported to other Indian Ocean ports. Henriette holds a BA from the University of York and an MA from the University of East Anglia (Sainsbury Research Unit), where her research focused on archaeological and historical approaches to slavery in West and East Africa.

18:00 - PUBLIC TALK - Subsurface Energy Choices: challenges and opportunities *cancelled* Website | More Information
Unfortunately due to current travel restrictions, this event has been cancelled. We hope to be able to reschedule this event at a later date.

A public lecture by Professor Derek Elsworth, Center for Geomechanics, Geofluids, and Geohazards, Pennsylvania State University and Robert and Maude Gledden Short Stay Visiting Fellow.

18:00 - CANCELLED - PUBLIC LECTURE - Migration, race and ethnicity: Reimagining Australia’s identity : With Tim Watts, federal member for Gellibrand Website | More Information
Unfortunately this event has been cancelled.

COVID-19

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How do Australians think of Australian identity? Do we see Australianness as a set of civic values and practices which, if embraced, allow all of us to be Australians equally? Or is national identity framed in terms of the once-dominant European ethnicity?

Tim Watts, federal member for Gellibrand and author of The Golden Country: Australia’s Changing Identity, will discuss the tensions and opportunities of Australia’s growing ethnic diversity. Tim will explore the relevance of once familiar Australian values; putting forth a compelling argument that we must now revisit our history “through the eyes of modern Australia”.

Tim will be joined by Professor Loretta Baldassar and Professor Benjamin Reilly who will debate some of the most vexing policy dilemmas that arise from the country’s rapidly changing ethnic landscape.
Thursday 19
8:00 - SEMINAR - Tailings Management: Responding to Emerging Challenges Seminar : This two-day seminar will address the emerging challenges in the day-to-day management of tailings storage facilities Website | More Information
This two-day seminar will address the emerging challenges in the day-to-day management of tailings storage facilities and the obligation to comply with the relevant operating standards and closure requirements. It will explore the conditions and obstacles encountered in everyday mining, and innovative solutions utilised in different mining operations and environments; and will include case studies, specialist presentations and discussion sessions.

This seminar will be run immediately following the Static Liquefaction Workshop, and you can choose to attend both events together at a discounted rate.

18:00 - PUBLIC TALK - White Australia has a Black History *event cancelled* Website | More Information
The 2020 Tom Stannage Memorial Lecture by Professor John Maynard, Chair of Aboriginal History, University of Newcastle and Director, Purai Global Indigenous History Centre.

Due to ongoing concerns about the development of the COVID-19 virus and the importance of reducing its spread, we have made the difficult decision to cancel this public lecture. We apologise for any disappointment, however we believe that this is the most responsible course of action at this time, as the health and wellbeing of our community take priority. We hope to reschedule this event at a later date.

19:00 - CANCELLED - PERFORMANCE - The Irwin Street Collective presents David Kim More Information
Unfortunately this event has been cancelled.

In light of the recent developments around international visitors arriving in Australia, we have taken the sad decision to cancel David Kim’s activities at the Conservatorium this week.

We will continue to monitor the Department of Health alerts and provide any important updates around other events as soon as they are available.

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David Hyun-Su Kim has distinguished himself as one of the most thoughtful and distinctive musicians to emerge from the newest generation of American pianists. A native of upstate New York, David holds degrees from Harvard, Yale, and Cornell universities and a doctorate from the New England Conservatory of Music in Boston. He has performed throughout the U.S., Canada, Austria, Germany, Italy, Belgium, the United Kingdom, South Korea, and Australia.

His current academic research focuses on performance practice, with particular emphasis on organology, historical recordings, performance style, improvisation, and notation.

As UWA Institute of Advanced Studies Visiting Fellow and Artist-in-Residence with the Irwin Street Collective, David will work closely with UWA Conservatorium of Music staff and students.

His visit will culminate in a lecture recital where he will perform (on Viennese fortepiano) Beethoven's Sonata in F major, Opus 10, No. 2, Sonata in F minor, Opus 2, No. 1, Andante Favori, WoO 57, Sonata in C# minor, Opus 27, No. 2 "Moonlight" plus Violin Sonata in G major, Opus 30, No. 3, with violinist Lauren Basney. Free entry | Bookings essential

https://www.trybooking.com/594707

In addition David will present a public masterclass with UWA piano students (Monday 16 March | 4pm | Callaway Auditorium | Free - no bookings required)

David will also present a session entitled 'Beethoven on Historical Instruments: Case Studies in Interpretation' as part of the Callaway Centre Research Seminar Series (Tuesday 17 March | 5pm | Eileen Joyce Studio | Free - no bookings required)
Friday 20
13:00 - PERFORMANCE - POSTPONED: PaintStorm : See Phil Doncon and experience the wonders of PaintStorm. Website | More Information
IMPORTANT UPDATE: Due to advice provided by the Australian Prime Minister and the Department of Health, this event will be cancelled until further notice.

Are you interested in attending an energetic and inspiring live paint performance? Stop by Oak Lawn on Friday, 20 March, from 1pm - 2pm, to see Phil Doncon and experience the wonders of PaintStorm.

This event is organised by the UWA CALD committee as part of a Harmony Week, a time in which we celebrate the multiculturalism of Australia and the successful integration of other cultures into our community. Australia is a multicultural country which admires the vibrancy of the oldest continuing culture of our first Australians to the new arrivals that now call Australia home.

Our cultural diversity is one of our greatest strengths and is at the heart of who we are. It makes Australia a great place to live.

Australia is one of the most successful multicultural countries in the world and we should celebrate this work to maintain it.

Harmony Week is about inclusiveness, respect and belonging for all Australians, regardless of cultural or linguistic background, united by a set of core Australian values.

PaintStorm is a live performance, which combines art, music and the occasional spurt of acrobatics all bought together in the theme of unity and diversity.

Phil Doncon is both an artist and a performer. his live painting performance is sure to entertain you through its vigorous and dynamic nature. Discussions will be held on issues relating to unity and diversity all whilst creating a painting. Thi painting will be based on the direction Phil Doncon takes during his storytelling process.

Be sure to take part in this fantastic event and experience all the wonders this performance has to offer!

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