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Today's date is Saturday, December 07, 2019
Events for the public
 November 2019
Wednesday 27
13:00 - PUBLIC TALK - Heat Therapy: An ancient practice to target modern diseases Website | More Information
A public lecture by Christopher T. Minson, PhD, Kenneth and Kenda Singer Professor, and UWA Institute of Advanced Studies Visiting Fellow.

Chronic heat exposure, in the form of saunas, hot water baths, and sweat lodges have been utilized in many cultures for thousands of years. While repetitive bouts of heat exposure is generally believed to be healthy, it is only recently that we are beginning to understand the full benefits of ‘heat therapy’ across the spectrum of human health. Passive heating results in a rise in body temperature and changes in cardiovascular hemodynamics, including altered shear patterns of blood flow. There is growing evidence that these responses to acute heat stress combine over repetitive sessions to provide a stress-resistant profile to counter inflammation and oxidative stress, as occurs with aging and chronic disease, as well as from acute damaging events such as ischemia-reperfusion injury. There is also growing evidence heat therapy can be used to target metabolic dysfunction in obesity and diabetes through improvements in insulin signaling in fat and muscle cells. This ancient therapy needs broader application to treat modern diseases, particularly in those not able to obtain the full benefits of exercise.

Dr Christopher Minson is the Kenneth and Kenda Singer Professor of Human Physiology. His research focuses on topics related to integrative cardiovascular physiology in humans. His lab investigates how we can use exposures to extreme environments to gain a healthy and resilient physiology. He is also involved in projects related to endocrine function in women, biomarkers of aging and the risk of cardiovascular and metabolic diseases, and finding novel ways to improve thermal comfort and safely in work environments. He also works with elite athletes in the use of environmental stressors to improve performance.

Dr Minson is a 2019 Institute of Advanced Studies Visiting Fellow.

This public lecture is presented by the UWA School of Human Sciences (Exercise and Sport Science).

18:00 - PUBLIC TALK - Re-presenting Islam and Muslims Post 9/11: Images, Words and Refusals : Public talk by Zulfikar Hirji, Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology, York University, Toronto Website | More Information
In a Post-9/11 world of evermoving words and images, how do we respond to negative and stereotypical representations of Islam and Muslims? Zulfikar Hirji discusses the perennial challenge of decolonizing and deorientalising portrayals of Islam and Muslims by drawing upon and theories of ‘recognition’ and ‘refusal’ articulated by Indigenous scholars in North America, and by reflecting upon his journey through academia and experience of producing 'Islam: An Illustrated Journey' (2018), a book that explores the diverse histories of Islam and Muslims over more than 1400 years.

Zulfikar Hirji (DPhil, Oxford) is Associate Professor in the Department of Anthropology at York University, Toronto. Professor Hirji’s scholarly interests are on Islam and Muslims in historical and contemporary contexts and on issues of knowledge production, representation and identity, visual and material culture, and critical pedagogy. He has conducted ethnographic fieldwork and archival research in South Asia, East Africa, the Arabian Peninsula, Europe and North America.
Thursday 28
17:00 - SEMINAR - Centre for Muslim States and Societies Seminar Series 2019- Event Cancelled : Islamic Revivalism and Politics in Malaysia: Problems in Nation Building More Information
In this lecture, Dr Bob Olivier explains the Islamisation process that has unfolded in Malaysia over the last fifty years. Based on his forthcoming book published by Palgrave Macmillan, Dr Olivier will present the findings from in-depth interviews with 100 of Malaysia’s “educated classes”, or “elite”, regarding their reactions to the changes that have accompanied Islamisation in the country, and how they feel it has impacted on them. The seminar will also shed light on the impacts the change in government in May 2019 is likely to have.

The lecture will be followed by light refreshments.

Profile highlights: • 24 years PA Consulting Group, in Australia, Hong Kong and Malaysia, last position Head of South-East Asia Region. • 25 years Founder and Chairman of ASPAC Executive Search, one of Malaysia’s leading search firms. • 21 years as a Director of the British Malaysian Chamber of Commerce. • Currently a Member of the Senate of the University of Western Australia. • Currently an Adviser to the Centre for Muslim States and Societies.

FREE ENTRY BUT RSVP: cmss-ss@uwa.edu.au

All welcome to attend.

18:00 - PUBLIC TALK - Anthropology and Sociology Seminar Series : The Unseen Archive of Idi Amin More Information
Over his eight years as president of Uganda, Idi Amin was the subject of hundreds of thousands of photographs. A team of photographers under the Ministry of Information followed Amin around, taking pictures of the many occasions when he appeared before the public. For decades it was thought that the photographs taken by the men of the Ministry had been lost.

However, in 2015, Richard Vokes, working with Winston Agaba and Malachi Kabaale at the Uganda Broadcasting Corporation in Kampala, uncovered a filing cabinet with over 70,000 of their photographic negatives. In 2018, UBC in partnership with Derek Peterson of the University of Michigan, and UWA, launched a project to digitize the archive. The first major exhibition of these images is now showing at the Uganda Museum.

In this lecture, Richard Vokes will narrate the social biography of the archive, and explore what it reveals about Idi Amin the man, about the nature of his regime, and about everyday life in Amin’s Uganda. It will argue that although the archive has provided extraordinary new insights into the Amin years, so too its discovery and exhibition have raised complicated questions regarding the politics of memory in post-colonial Uganda. The lecture will describe how the project team have sought to engage with public discussions on this subject, in partnership with our many Ugandan collaborators – who include survivors of Amin’s torture chambers, and the relatives of his 300,000 victims.

About the Speaker

Richard Vokes is Associate Professor in Anthropology at UWA. His research focuses primarily on Uganda, where he has been conducting ethnographic fieldwork since 2000. He has published extensively, including on the history of photography, media and social change. His books include: Ghosts of Kanungu (2009); Routes and Traces: Anthropology, Photography and the Archive (with Marcus Banks, 2010); Photography in Africa (2012); Media and Development (2018) and; The Unseen Archive of Idi Amin (with Derek Peterson, forthcoming 2020).

Free event! RSVP: online via www.ias.uwa.edu.au/lectures/vokes

18:00 - EVENT - The Unseen Archive of Idi Amin Website | More Information
A public lecture by Richard Vokes, Associate Professor in Anthropology, The University of Western Australia.

Over his eight years as president of Uganda, Idi Amin was the subject of hundreds of thousands of photographs. A team of photographers under the Ministry of Information followed Amin around, taking pictures of the many occasions when he appeared before the public. For decades it was thought that the photographs taken by the men of the Ministry had been lost. However in 2015 Richard Vokes, working with Winston Agaba and Malachi Kabaale at the Uganda Broadcasting Corporation in Kampala, uncovered a filing cabinet with over 70,000 of their photographic negatives. In 2018, UBC in partnership with Derek Peterson of the University of Michigan, and UWA, launched a project to digitize the archive. The first major exhibition of these images is now showing at the Uganda Museum.

In this lecture, Richard Vokes will narrate the social biography of the archive, and explore what it reveals about Idi Amin the man, about the nature of his regime, and about everyday life in Amin’s Uganda. It will argue that although the archive has provided extraordinary new insights into the Amin years, so too its discovery and exhibition have raised complicated questions regarding the politics of memory in post-colonial Uganda. The lecture will describe how the project team have sought to engage with public discussions on this subject, in partnership with our many Ugandan collaborators – who include survivors of Amin’s torture chambers, and the relatives of his 300,000 victims.
Friday 29
11:00 - EVENT - Linguistics Seminar Series 2019 : Does a Mixed Language always have only two souce languages? More Information
It is conventionally thought that one of the distinguishing characteristics of a mixed language is that this type of language is derived from a combination of only two source languages. Other distinguishing features include the ways in which the source language components are distributed in the mixed language, showing significant amounts of lexicon and grammar from each source. The Australian mixed language, Light Warlpiri, shows clear evidence of contributions from three languages – Warlpiri, Kriol and English – in different areas of the grammar, thereby questioning the assumption of only two source languages. Drawing on work on the verbal auxiliary system, the reciprocal and reflexive systems and the realisation of fricatives in Light Warlpiri, I will show how each of the source languages contributes. I conclude that although Light Warlpiri is a mixed language, it combines material from three sources, in different parts of the grammar. This may drive us to revisit the definition of a mixed language, looking more at how source language material is distributed, rather than at the number of sources.

Short bio

Carmel O’Shannessy is a Senior Lecturer in the School of Literature, Languages and Linguistics at the Australian National University. Her research is in language contact and acquisition, including the emergence of Light Warlpiri, a new Australian mixed language, and children’s development of Light Warlpiri and Warlpiri. She has been involved with languages and education in remote Indigenous communities in Australia since 1996, in the areas of bilingual education and her current research.

12:00 - SEMINAR - Linguistics Seminar Series 2019 : How to Take a Complement in the Eastern Caribbeans? More Information
In early creole studies, variation in the form of the complementiser was taken as a diagnostic of a speaker’s position on the (post-)creole continuum (e.g. Bickerton 1971; Washabaugh 1977). With the exception of relative clause markers, complementisers have received little attention since then (cf. Winford 2008; Velupillai 2015), possibly because of their low salience as well as the need for large corpora of natural speech to study their patterns of variation.

This paper uses a corpus of English(-based creole) consisting of sociolinguistic interviews recorded between 2003 and 2005 in Bequia (St Vincent and the Grenadines) to analyse the choice of complementiser choice in three contexts: finite (1) and non-finite verbal complements (2) and relative clauses (3).

(1) a. I believe Ø they born here. (PF24/00:41) b. I have to believe that they say so, but I don’t know. (MP2/18:16) (2) a. You only want to see her when it is dark. (LP28/7:37) b. Yeah, who want for go there, who got money for go to them. (H11/46:01) c. Sometime I want Ø go night church. (H8/2:45) (3) a. You’ll have lots of people that still go to church. (MP103/53:45) b. If you have children who are not mature enough … (LP28/11:53) c. There’s some girls Ø still does go. (H5/27:46)

From interviews with 26 speakers from four villages of different ethnic compositions and socioeconomic histories, 9,616 complementiser tokens were exhaustively extracted and coded for a range of social and linguistic factors.

Principal components analysis of variant distribution allows us to characterize each speaker according to three underlying factors: zeroes (1a, 2c, 3c), that or wh-forms (1b, 3a, b) and for (2b). Although speakers from particular villages tend to cluster together in their use of variants, there are several outliers and some overlap between villages. We provide some preliminary analysis of the distribution of complementiser variants according to linguistic context and function. The results of these analyses suggest that complementation is a means of differentiation between villages in Bequia, but in contrast to early creole studies, speakers do not fit neatly onto a linear continuum.



References Bickerton, D. 1971. Inherent variability and variable rules. Foundations of Language 7:457-92. Velupillai, V. 2015. Pidgins, creoles & mixed languages. Amsterdam: Benjamins. Washabaugh, W. 1977. Constraining variation in decreolization. Language 53:329-52. Winford, D. 2008. Atlantic creole syntax. In S. Kouwenberg & J.V. Singler (eds.), Handbook of pidgin and creole studies. Oxford: Blackwell, 19-47.

Short bio James Walker has been Professor of Language Diversity at La Trobe University since 2017. He received a BA in Linguistics (1989) and an MA in Anthropology (1991) from the University of Toronto and an MA (1995) and PhD (2000) in Linguistics from the University of Ottawa. From 2000 to 2017 he held various positions at York University (Toronto), including Professor of Linguistics. He is an international expert in the study of sociolinguistic variation and change and has conducted studies of phonetics/phonology, morphology and syntax in varieties of English spoken in the United States, Canada and the Caribbean, as well as research on Sango (Central African Republic), Swedish and Brazilian Portuguese. He is the author of Variation in Linguistic Systems (2010, Routledge), Canadian English: A Sociolinguistic Perspective (2015, Routledge) and (with Miriam Meyerhoff) Bequia Talk (2013, Battlebridge) and the editor of Aspect in Grammatical Variation (2010, Benjamins).


 December 2019
Tuesday 03
18:00 - PUBLIC LECTURE - Bazm-e-Sarfraz Annual Public Lecture : Muslim Youth in America More Information
The Centre for Muslim States and Societies invites you to Bazm-e-Sarfraz annual event commemorating the contributions made by Begum Sarfraz Iqbal (1939-2003) towards promoting Urdu literature and championing the cause of inter-communal harmony.

At this year’s event, Dr Ghazala Hayat, daughter of Begum Sarfraz Iqbal, will speak on her experiences in the United States working with Muslim youth and on the issue of radicalisation.

The lecture will be followed by supper.

About the speaker

Professor Ghazala Hayat, daughter of Begum Sarfraz Iqbal, is Chair of Public Relations for the Islamic Foundation of Greater St. Louis and a past board president of Interfaith Partnership. She is also Professor of Neurology at the Saint Louis University School of Medicine. Among various leadership positions, she is director of the Clinical Neurophysiology fellowship and she is also director of the ALS clinic.

About Begum Sarfraz Iqbal

Born in Rohtak, India, Begum Sarfraz Iqbal migrated to Pakistan at a young age and became a patron of Urdu literature and art in Pakistan. She authored two books: Daman-e-Yusuf (Mavara Publishers, 1989) and Jo Bachay Hain Sang (Naqoosh, 2002) and wrote regular columns in Daily Ausaf (Islamabad) and Daily Pakistan. She also published numerous articles in other literary magazines including Mah-e-Nau.

Begum Sarfraz Iqbal was a philanthropist who introduced the idea of adopting schools to improve the quality of education in Pakistan and ceaselessly worked to help disadvantaged people in Pakistan. The events commemorating her contributions focus on ideas that unite people across religious and cultural divides and focus attention on ideas and philosophies of moderate Muslim thinkers.
Friday 06
18:00 - PERFORMANCE - UWA Christmas Concert for Lifeline WA Website | More Information
This is your night! Gather your family and friends and join Santa for the 2019 UWA Christmas Concert in support of Lifeline WA. The UWA Conservatorium of Music, national artists and community choirs will perform all your favourite Christmas songs.

Hosted by Nadia Mitsopoulos (ABC and Lifeline WA), this year’s concert is the biggest yet, as we move to a new location on UWA’s Riley Oval. Have your face-painted, visit the Christmas craft corner and have a chat to the one and only Santa.

So pack a picnic, don your Santa hat and bring the whole family along for a fun-filled festive musical evening!

There will be a selection of tasty snacks available from local food trucks and the University Club of WA will be open if you want to grab a pre-show drink. Please bring something to sit on (chairs only permitted in marked areas).

Time: Pre-show entertainment starts at 6pm with a special kids program at 6.30pm. Main show starts at 7pm.

Parking: Please consider using public transport as parking is limited during the Perth Festival Lotterywest Film Season at the Somerville Auditorium  (why not make a night of it and catch a movie at the after the concert)?

Bookings: FREE entry - suitable for all ages, please register online.
Tuesday 10
18:00 - PUBLIC TALK - Medical Image Computing (MIC): we are living in interesting times Website | More Information
A public lecture by Dr Ron Kikinis, Professor of Radiology, Harvard Medical School

During the last decade, results from basic research in the fields of genetics and immunology have begun to impact treatment in a variety of diseases. Checkpoint therapy, for instance has fundamentally changed the treatment and survival of some patients with melanoma. The medical workplace has transformed from an artisanal organization into an industrial enterprise environment. Workflows in the clinic are increasingly standardized. Their timing and execution are monitored through omnipresent software systems. This has resulted in an acceleration of the pace of care delivery. Imaging and image post-processing have rapidly evolved as well, enabled by ever-increasing computational power, novel sensor systems and novel mathematical approaches. Organizing the data and making it findable and accessible is an ongoing challenge and is investigated through a variety of research efforts. These topics will be reviewed and discussed during the lecture.

Dr Kikinis is the founding Director of the Surgical Planning Laboratory, Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, and a Professor of Radiology at Harvard Medical School. This laboratory was founded in 1990. Before joining Brigham & Women’s Hospital in 1988, he trained as a resident in radiology at the University Hospital in Zurich, and as a researcher in computer vision at the ETH in Zurich, Switzerland. He received his MD degree from the University of Zurich, Switzerland, in 1982. In 2004 he was appointed Professor of Radiology at Harvard Medical School. In 2009 he was the inaugural recipient of the MICCAI Society “Enduring Impact Award”.

 January 2020
Saturday 18
9:00 - COURSE - Gold Standard GAMSAT Live Courses Perth Day 1 : 8-hour Non-science Review, Strategies and PBL:Section 1 and 2 Website | More Information
Learn, review and address your weaknesses and develop your GAMSAT-level reasoning skills in Section 1 and 2.

 February 2020
Saturday 08
9:30 - WORKSHOP - Introduction to Digital Photography : Learn from the Master Photographer himself! Website | More Information
Photography is one of the world’s most popular pastimes and yet many people don’t understand how to use and maximise the creative controls of their camera. Regardless of whether you use a compact; DSLR or a mirror-less camera; this workshop will explain the many creative choices you have in setting up and using your camera with the aim of shooting some stunning images. Nick Melidonis has been one of Australia’s foremost photographers and photo educators for over two decades. A Master Photographer with five gold bars, named number two in the world in 2016 and a finalist in the National Geographic 2016 'Travel Photographer of the Year'.

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