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Today's date is Monday, December 16, 2019
Events for the public
 October 2019
Sunday 20
14:30 - PERFORMANCE - UWA Music presents: Chamber Music Festival | Blackwood Website | More Information
Join us for an immersive weekend celebrating the finest chamber music ever written. Brought to you by a stellar cast of musicians, including national and international artists as well as Western Australia’s finest emerging talent.

Iain Grandage’s Blackwood is a beautiful work for voice, clarinet and piano inspired by the unique landscape of Western Australia and with evocative poetry by WA poet and musician Kevin Gillam. Don’t miss your chance to hear this work performed once again by the very musicians it was written for, Sara Macliver (soprano), Allan Meyer (clarinet) and Graeme Gilling (piano).

Single Tickets: $20 Standard | $15 Concessions Festival Passes available

trybooking.com/BFQEY

Please join us for a pre-concert talk in the Tunley Lecture Theatre commencing at 2pm.

16:00 - PERFORMANCE - UWA Music presents: Chamber Music Festival | Mendelssohn's Octet Website | More Information
Join us for an immersive weekend celebrating the finest chamber music ever written. Brought to you by a stellar cast of musicians, including national and international artists as well as Western Australia’s finest emerging talent.

Composed when he was just 16, Mendelssohn’s vivacious Octet in E flat major Op 20 is a masterpiece for double string quartet. Join Irwin Street Collective Artist in Residence, Catherine Jones, plus an ensemble of UWA staff, students and graduates to experience this magnificent work.

Single Tickets: $20 Standard | $15 Concessions

Festival passes available

trybooking.com/BFQEY

17:00 - PERFORMANCE - UWA Music presents: Chamber Music Festival | Innovation Chamber More Information
Join us for an immersive weekend celebrating the finest chamber music ever written. Brought to you by a stellar cast of musicians, including national and international artists as well as Western Australia’s finest emerging talent.

UWA’s thriving community of emerging composers will work closely with celebrated composer James Ledger, to create new and imaginative works for voice, clarinet and piano. The works will use texts about the Australian landscape by WA writers selected by UWA’s Creative Writing Department. Who will win this year’s Dorothy Ellen Ransom Prize in Musical Composition, vote for your favourite new work in the People’s Choice Award and enjoy a new work by Brock Stannard-Brown.

Single tickets $5

Festival passes available

trybooking.com/BFQEY

19:00 - PERFORMANCE - UWA Music presents: Chamber Music Festival | Catherine Jones and Friends Website | More Information
Join us for an immersive weekend celebrating the finest chamber music ever written. Brought to you by a stellar cast of musicians, including national and international artists as well as Western Australia’s finest emerging talent.

UWA graduate and Baroque cellist Catherine Jones enjoys an international and varied career, performing and recording both as a soloist and with ensembles. In this concert she’ll join the Irwin Street Collective to perform works by Beethoven, Hummel and a new commission by honours student Jet Kye Chong.

FREE CONCERT - proudly supported by the UWA Institute of Advanced Studies

Bookings required: trybooking.com/BFQEY

Please join us at 6.30pm for a free pre-concert talk in the Tunley Lecture Theatre.
Tuesday 22
10:00 - EVENT - The Great Song Cycle: Mastering the art of doing everything you love, and getting away with it : Masterclass with musician and author, Joanna Wallfisch Website | More Information
Internationally acclaimed musician and author, Joanna Wallfisch, visits IAS to present a masterclass, performance and discussion on how to balance and combine the concepts of career, vocation and one’s life passions. A songwriting and vocal coach, she will offer tips of conveying story through the written word and also through music.

In 2016 Joanna released her third album on Sunnyside Records. She was living in NYC at the time, feeling jaded by the thankless hustle of a musician’s life and sorely aware of the sacrifices she’d made to live it. In a moment of inspiration she decided to recall her adventurous side and head to California to tour her new album, usurping the usual cars and buses and instead travel by bicycle. She called the tour “The Great Song Cycle”. What transpired was a concert tour turned effervescent. Not only did it alter her perception of her own strength, physical and emotional resources, but the journey inspired her to write her debut memoir, published by UWA Press, and record and release her latest record ‘Far Away From Any Place Called Home’, thus combing her passion for adventure with her career as a musician. The story and music have since taken her around the world, and she is now in Australia to tour the book and album... by bicycle, of course!

Joanna’s unique musical background shines through in her own compositional style, evoking her classical routes with her love of jazz, art-song, folk and pop, pushing boundaries of genre and stylistic expectations. She is a master in the art of live vocal looping and as a multi-instrumentalist plays baritone ukulele, piano, flute, Indian shruti box, kalimba and melodica. Her music defies genre classification as she effortlessly imbues her songs with nuances of jazz, classical, art-song, and folk, carrying her “clear-eyed poetry” (Boston Globe) and “striking vocals” (Hothouse). Her songwriting extends beyond just lyrics and melody - Joanna also arranges for ensembles including string quartets, winds, a cappella voices and more. She first studied to be a painter at Central Saint Martins, London. This led her to Paris, where she sang on the bridges of the Seine with the “Rene Miller Wedding Band”. Following this formative time she did a masters in jazz at Guildhall School of Music and Drama. In 2012 she moved to New York City where she forged an indelible musical path, appearing and collaborating with musicians including Dan Tepfer, Wynton said, “overflowed with creativity and musical resources entitled “Far Away From Any Place Called Home”.

10:00 - PUBLIC LECTURE - Eye Health and Research Lectures : Free community lectures at the Lions Eye Institute Website | More Information
The Lions Eye Institute will host 4 free public lectures about eye health and eye research: 10am Prof Bill Morgan: 'Adventures in the Pressure Space' - the optic nerve in Glaucoma and in outer space. 11.30am Dr Andrea Ang: 'Can I get rid of my glasses Doc?' - LASIK and refractive surgery 1pm Dr Hessom Razavi: 'Journey into the Eye' - looking at the eye and disease through virtual reality 2.30pm Dr Angus Turner: 'Country eyes' - how to give sight-saving treatment away from the city lights

18:00 - PUBLIC TALK - The Last Indigenous People of Europe, but for how long? Website | More Information
A public lecture by Steven G.M. Schilizzi, Professor of Environmental and Agricultural Economics, Faculty of Science, UWA.

Sápmi, or Lapland, sits at the extreme north of Scandinavia, mostly above the Arctic Circle, and straddles four countries. Its people, the Sami (formerly the Lapps), have inhabited this land for several millennia. Yet today, their future as a people is threatened. Yes, there has been a revival of their sense of identity, of their culture and their customs; but paradoxically, unlike the past, the present danger comes perhaps more from within than from without. The new “black gold rush” in the Barents Sea is creating as many threats as opportunities, while economic and environmental pressures, with government policies, are undermining the very foundations of their culture and of their social norms.

In this talk, Steven will share, with pictures and videos, his experience in Sápmi where he spent part of the winter 2019. He was lucky enough to stay with actively engaged Sami people, in their homes in Kautokeino and Karasjok, their two main townships. He learnt first-hand about their current situation; their collective and personal histories; their treatment by their respective governments (with parallels to indigenous Australians); the status of their languages; and, given the threats and opportunities created by the new “black gold rush” in the Barents Sea, the challenges facing their cultural survival in the 21st century.

Steven Schilizzi is Professor of Environmental and Agricultural Economics in the Faculty of Science at UWA. His work, both in Australia and in Europe, currently focuses on how public agencies can incentivize private landholders to supply environmental services (like biodiversity protection or reduced pollution into waterways), and on how equity concerns can be rigorously incorporated into environmental policies in trade-offs with other policy objectives. He has authored or co-authored more than 120 scientific articles, 20 book chapters and 4 books including 'Natural Resources and Environmental Justice'.

18:00 - PUBLIC TALK - The Last Indigenous People of Europe, but for how long? Website | More Information
A public lecture by Steven G.M. Schilizzi, Professor of Environmental and Agricultural Economics, Faculty of Science, UWA

Sápmi, or Lapland, sits at the extreme north of Scandinavia, mostly above the Arctic Circle, and straddles four countries. Its people, the Sami (formerly the Lapps), have inhabited this land for several millennia. Yet today, their future as a people is threatened. Yes, there has been a revival of their sense of identity, of their culture and their customs; but paradoxically, unlike the past, the present danger comes perhaps more from within than from without. The new “black gold rush” in the Barents Sea is creating as many threats as opportunities, while economic and environmental pressures, with government policies, are undermining the very foundations of their culture and of their social norms.

In this talk, Steven will share, with pictures and videos, his experience in Sápmi where he spent part of the winter 2019. He was lucky enough to stay with actively engaged Sami people, in their homes in Kautokeino and Karasjok, their two main townships. He learnt first-hand about their current situation; their collective and personal histories; their treatment by their respective governments (with parallels to indigenous Australians); the status of their languages; and, given the threats and opportunities created by the new “black gold rush” in the Barents Sea, the challenges facing their cultural survival in the 21st century.
Wednesday 23
18:00 - EVENT - Taking the pulse of Italy today: a creative presence in Europe and in Australia Website | More Information
A public lecture by H.E. Francesca Tardioli, Ambassador of Italy in Australia

This lecture is part of a year-long series that celebrates the 90th Anniversary of Italian Studies at UWA

2019 marks the 90th anniversary of the teaching of Italian language and culture at The University of Western Australia.

In 1929, Francesco Vanzetti, an idiosyncratic and popular Venetian, offered the first courses in Italian. This was the first appointment of a lecturer in Italian in any Australian university.

This lecture series, supported by the Institute of Advanced Studies and by Italian Studies in the UWA School of Humanities, celebrates aspects of Italian language and culture, past and present.

18:00 - PUBLIC TALK - The Power of Earth: the 2015 Gorkha (Nepal) earthquake and case studies Website | More Information
A public lecture by Dr Lijun Deng, Associate Professor, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Alberta and 2019 UWA Robert and Maude Gledden Senior Visiting Fellow.

Earthquakes are one of the most catastrophic natural hazards worldwide. What can happen to buildings, schools, embankments, or bridges when an earthquake strikes? How do engineers design for earthquakes? Although continental Australia is often considered earthquake “proof”, the performance of offshore facilities under seismic loading is a critical consideration for Australia’s offshore energy infrastructure.

This lecture will describe common geotechnical and structural failure mechanisms relevant for earthquake design using several case studies from the 2015 Gorkha (Nepal) earthquake. This earthquake of moment magnitude Mw 7.8 struck Nepal on April 25, 2015. Several aftershocks occurred, including an aftershock of Mw 7.3 on May 12. Tragically, the Gorkha earthquake claimed the lives of 8,600 people, making it one of the most deadly natural disasters in the past few decades. This presentation will present field reconnaissance that was undertaken in the Kathmandu Valley and regions near the main shock epicentre immediately after the main shock to survey the damage to infrastructure. The tectonic and geologic settings of Nepal will be briefly described along with case histories including landslides, road embankment settlement, bridge foundations and abutment damage, and liquefaction. Liquefaction, in particular, was identified in numerous locations within the Kathmandu Valley, leading to significant damage. A large number of the fatalities due to this event were caused by building failure, and so the patterns of damage or failure of various types of buildings will be illustrated.
Thursday 24
12:00 - EVENT - Friends of the Grounds Plant Sale : October 24 and 25 between 12-2PM at The University of Western Australia's Taxonomic Gardens Website | More Information
Friends of the Grounds are holding a Plant Sale on October 24 and 25 between 12-2PM at The University of Western Australia's Taxonomic Gardens (near the Botany glass houses)! Location map: https://bit.ly/2XORLsP 🌷

As usual, there will be plenty of awesome plant finds (herbs, succulents etc) ranging from $3-5 each 🌿 This sale is CASH ONLY and open to staff, students and the public. Please bring a carry bag, trolley or cardboard box to carry your new plant friends home 📦

All proceeds will go towards the maintenance of UWA's grounds!

12:00 - SEMINAR - Pleistocene archaeological sites in developing countries across Asia: Research and management More Information
Abstract

There are a number of challenges that face the cultural heritage management of prehistoric sites dating back to the Pleistocene. Conservation, which includes research, and protection of such sites, requires approaches that are uniquely applicable to this context. Discussion will revolve around four Pleistocene sites across Asia: the fossil hominin sites of Dmanisi, Georgia, and Sangiran, Java, Indonesia, and two further sites in the Philippines, Rizal, Kalinga Province, and Callao, Peñablanca, Cagayan Province. While each site has its own unique set of elements, all of these are located within developing countries, a key factor that has an impact on how they are managed.The archaeological research that has been generated and continues to be carried out in these four sites as well as the efforts to manage other aspects such as protection, presentation and dissemination of information, interpretation and creation of value for the public, involvement and engagement of the locals will also be examined.

Biographical information

Caroline Marie Quinto (Mylene) Lising specialises in heritage studies and applications with a focus on Southeast Asia, human origins and Palaeolithic archaeology. She is a Cultural Deputy Officer at the National Museum of the Philippines and a lecturer in Sociology and Anthropology at Ateneo de Manila University. She recently received a grant from the Gerda Henkel Foundation (Germany) to build the Rizal Town Library, Kalinga, Philippines. Mylene holds an Erasmus Mundus International Master in Quaternary Science and Prehistory from the Muséum National d’histoire Naturelle, Paris, France. She is currently a PhD student at Goethe University in Frankfurt and a guest researcher at the ROCEEH (The Role of Culture in the Expansion of Early Humans) program at the Senckenberg Research Institution.

16:00 - FREE LECTURE - Shann Lecture: The End of Normal in Politics and Economics : Shann Memorial Lecture 2019 with Jennifer Hewett (AFR) Website | More Information
The UWA Business School Economics Department is pleased to invite you to attend the annual Shann Memorial Lecture, The End of Normal in Politics and Economics on Thursday 24 October.

Polarization over Brexit, China’s military belligerence, political deterioration in Hong Kong and lack of US leadership are all contributing to increasing political dysfunction and unpredictability in the global economy. What does this mean for the Australian economy? Join Jennifer Hewett (The Australian Financial Review) for an up-to-date and insightful discussion of these major challenges facing us today.

The annual Shann Memorial Lecture was introduced to honour the memory of the Foundation Professor of Economics at UWA, Edward Owen Giblin Shann. Edward Shann has been regarded as the pioneer of the academic development of economics and traditional Australian economic history and he was a strong advocate of individual intellectual freedom and developing a sense of social responsibilities. He penned several books and essays on the economic history of Australia and was a major influence in formulating financial and fiscal policies in Australia.

16:00 - SEMINAR - Exploring Sea Country through high-resolution 3D seismic imaging of Australia’s NW Shelf: resolving early coastal landscapes and preservation of underwater cultural heritage More Information
Abstract

Almost 2 million square km of Australia’s continental shelf was flooded following the termination of the last glacial maximum, and with it the cultural heritage of the first arrival and coastal occupation of Australia beginning some 65,000 years ago. In order to prospect for this missing cultural record, we must first identify submerged coastal landscapes and landforms which likely provided favourable environments for occupation and potential settlement by aboriginal groups. However due to the sheer size of the Australian continental margin, it has proven challenging to locate and identify prospective submerged cultural sites. In order to improve the chances of success, we take a novel approach using industry 3D seismic datasets, which cover vast areas of Australia’s continental shelf, to map seafloor bathymetry at high resolution (10 to 25 m). Our study focuses on the mid/outer shelf regions proximal to Barrow Island where there is evidence of Aboriginal occupation as far back as 50,000 years BP. The 3D seismic bathymetry, which covers an area of 6,500 square km, revealed a highly complex and geomorphically mature coastal landscape preserved at depths of −70 to −75 m, including coastal barrier dunes, lagoonal systems, tidal flats and estuarine channels, each are highly productive and understood as preferred habitation sites for Aboriginal groups. Based on the seabed depth of the submerged shorelines and reconstructed sea level curves we determine that these coastal landforms likely formed during a sustained interval of stable sea level spanning Marine Isotope Stage 3 (57 to 29 ka).

Biographical information

Dr Michael O’Leary is Senior Lecturer in Climate Geoscience at the School of Earth Sciences, UWA, with research expertise in the fields of tropical coastal geomorphology, coral reef and reef-island evolution, and climate change. His research focuses on (1) sea level reconstructions during periods of known climate instability, a metric that speaks directly to the stability of the Polar ice sheets, and (2) tropical coastal response, in particular, low reef-island response to future sea level rise. He is currently undertaking investigations into the Quaternary evolution of the NW Shelf, and in particular, reconstructing the physical and cultural environments that relate to the shelf's remnant submerged landscapes.

18:00 - PUBLIC TALK - FREE PUBLIC SEMINAR: Geopolitics of Maritime Pasts: Connecting the Indian Ocean and South China Sea : Ideas about peaceful seas and civilisations in dialogue are 'strategic narratives' at a time when States seek power through structures of connectivity Website | More Information
In their recent show of friendship, why exactly did Xi Jinping and Narendra Modi exchange portraits of each other on silk and ceramic? While the Western media didn’t ponder such matters, the meaning of these gifts was debated intensely in both China and India. This presentation demonstrates why this moment forms part of a much larger, and fast changing, landscape of geocultural politics. China’s Belt and Road Initiative is driving this, transforming the geopolitics of the Indian Ocean and South China Sea through a narrative of a ‘revived’ Maritime Silk Road.

To date, analyses of maritime geopolitics in these regions have primarily gravitated around sea-lane ‘choke points’, or the construction of port infrastructure and artificial islands. What has been missed is the strategic importance countries across Asia now place on crafting and revising history for maritime diplomacy and economic development. As we will see, for Indonesia, it is the ‘spice routes’, elsewhere it might be Zheng He. The presentation demonstrates the Maritime Silk Road is not 2000 years old, but a history invented at the end of the Cold War. A series of short films will be shown to illustrate how think-tanks, academics, museums, BBC World, Russia Today, and Chinese state television uncritically repeat this ‘history’ of trade and exchange, and it will be argued that ideas about peaceful seas and civilisations in dialogue are ‘strategic narratives’ at a time when states seek power through structures of connectivity.

19:00 - EVENT - Glaucoma: what’s on the horizon? Website | More Information
The Lions Eye Institute and the UWA Institute of Advanced Studies present the 2019 Ian Constable Lecture - by Professor Keith Martin, Managing Director, Centre for Eye Research Australia.

Glaucoma remains the leading cause of irreversible blindness worldwide. The field of glaucoma is currently experiencing a renaissance, with multiple innovations in drug delivery and surgery expanding the range of options available to those who treat the disease. Personalised medicine is becoming more common in healthcare and it seems inevitable that this approach will be applied to glaucoma as we attempt to target treatments to those most likely to benefit in a world of constrained resources.

In this lecture, Professor Martin will consider some of the likely developments in glaucoma diagnosis and treatment in the near future, from genomics to continuous IOP monitoring to gene and cell therapies. In particular, studies have found gene therapy approaches to be very promising and Professor Martin will discuss a project using AAV2 vectors to deliver BDNF and its receptor, TrkB, to retinal ganglion cells that is moving rapidly towards clinical translation. Finally, the talk will outline the prospects for optic nerve regeneration – a goal that once seemed impossible that is now becoming conceivable.

19:00 - PUBLIC LECTURE - Annual Ian Constable Lecture 2019 : Speaker: Professor Keith Martin will consider some of the likely developments in glaucoma diagnosis and treatment in the near future. Website | More Information
2019 marks the 20th anniversary of this annual lecture, which is presented by the Lions Eye Institute and the UWA Institute of Advanced Studies and honours the work of Professor Ian Constable.

Professor Constable is recognised as one of the world’s leading ophthalmic surgeons. He was appointed the Lions Foundation Chair of Ophthalmology in 1975. In 1983 Professor Constable established the Lions Eye Institute (LEI) dedicated to the prevention and treatment of blindness and eye disease. Today the LEI is a not-for-profit centre of excellence that combines world class scientific research into the prevention of blindness with the highest level of eye care delivery, combining the expertise of researchers and ophthalmologists.

19:30 - PERFORMANCE - UWA Music presents: Centre Stage | Waveney Wansborough Memorial Prize More Information
In 2019, the Waveney Wansbrough Memorial Prize will be awarded to the students who present the best performance of a work for piano duo. If you love keyboard performances, this evening is for you.

Free entry, no bookings required.
Friday 25
13:00 - PERFORMANCE - UWA Music presents: Lunchtime Concert | End of year celebration More Information
Be transported from the everyday by our free lunchtime concert series, featuring the best musical talent from with the UWA Conservatorium of Music and around the country.

The Conservatorium celebrates a busy year of music-making with this special culmination concert to farewell its 2019 concert series.

Free entry, no bookings required.

14:30 - SEMINAR - Anthropology & Sociology Seminar Series 2019 More Information
Title: The Power of Shared Heritage: China’s Belt Road Initiative and the Politics of Silk Road Heritage

Presenter: Erin Linn

In 2013, China formally announced the Belt and Road Initiative (BRI), a multinational global development, infrastructure, and investment initiative involving more than 70 countries. As part of its multi-pronged strategy, China is using a number of mechanisms to realise the goals of BRI: infrastructure development, economic and business investments, diplomacy, political negotiations, culture, and cultural heritage. To gain public support for the initiative China is promoting “people-to people bonds”, one of five strategic “cooperation priorities” of the Belt and Road Initiative (NDRC, 2015). Cultural heritage is identified as a key tool by which to foster “people-to-people bonds”. To date, research has primarily focused on the political, economic, and policy implications of BRI in an attempt to understand the motivating factors behind this grand strategy. Few scholars have considered the cultural implications of BRI and how China’s explicit use of cultural heritage may impact the people living in areas most affected by Belt and Road projects. Belt and Road Initiative represents a complex web of institutions, networks of connectivity, and identities spanning vast geographic distances. Through public discourse the BRI is being framed as a revitalization of the ancient Silk Roads. China is both creating and promoting a notion of shared heritage using imagery, history, and heritage of the ancient Silk Roads. This notion of shared heritage is framed around conceptualisations of inter/intra-regional heritage rooted in ideas of an ancient trade network based on peaceful and prosperous cross-cultural exchange between nations. In creating this conception of shared heritage, the heritage of nation states, and ethnic and religious groups are circumvented, the significance of national borders lessens, and new identities are forged. This PhD seeks to understand if notions of shared heritage exist in the context of the lived experiences of communities in countries impacted by BRI, outside of official discourse. The research contributes to the emerging field of shared heritage by developing a conceptual framework of shared heritage drawing on theories of cosmopolitanism. Using this framework China’s use of trans-regional heritage is interrogated to identify how notions of shared heritage are being created and promoted. Oriented by a qualitative methodology and place-based studies, the thesis explores if and how these ideas are manifesting within institutions, policies, and local communities in Central Asia. Fieldwork in Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, and Uzbekistan will be conducted to investigate how these complex ideas of shared heritage are being received, understood, and/or affecting individuals impacted by BRI.

Bio: Erin is a PhD candidate at UWA researching China’s use of cultural heritage within the context of the Belt Road Initiative. Her work explores the emerging concept of shared heritage and how China is creating and operationalizing notions of a shared heritage of the ancient Silk Roads as a key strategy of the BRI. She is interested in understanding how these complex ideas of shared heritage are being received, understood, and/or affecting the lived experiences of individuals and communities impacted by BRI. Erin’s research is informed by 15 years of work in cultural heritage and archaeology in Southeast Asia, Jordan, Israel, Italy, Australia, the US, and the United Kingdom. She holds an MA in Archaeology from the University College London and an MA in Cultural Heritage from Deakin University and is the founder and director of the non-profit organization, Integrated Heritage Project.

Title: Spark-ling New Social Relations. Social Network Analysis and Design-Based Research in practice

Presenter: Lukasz Krzyzowski

Technological innovation in health care can have a positive impact on seniors’ independence at home, enhance their wellbeing, and maintain social networks. While in many cases end-users’ perspectives are included in the process of technology development, this presentation provides a case study for a relation-centred approach combined with the Living Lab model. The Spark Living Lab was a creative environment where project partners and end-users were actively involved in co-designing, prototyping, and testing a mobile application through participation in social network research, a series of design thinking workshops, usability tests, and use of the app ‘in practice’ in the community, enabling the project’s outcomes to be measured and scaled up.

Bio: Dr Lukasz Krzyzowski is Manager of the UWA Social Care and Social Ageing Living Lab (UWA School of Social Sciences) and Assistant Professor at AGH University of Science and Technology in Krakow. Lukasz is a certified project evaluator, Design Thinking facilitator, user-centred service and product designer with aged care, and community engagement expertise. Lukasz previously worked on European Commission funded projects including “ICT for Ageing Well”, and recently on “Smartcare: Social Rechnology, Aged Care, and Transnational Connections”. Lukasz currently collaborates with Befriend Inc. to co-design digital services for people with disability in WA.

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