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Today's date is Tuesday, December 10, 2019
Events for the public
 October 2019
Wednesday 16
18:00 - PUBLIC TALK - Margaret Cavendish’s Life of Newcastle (1667), a Wifely Intervention in the Making of History Website | More Information
A public lecture by Dr Diana Barnes, Lecturer in English Literary Studies, University of New England and 2019 UWA Institute of Advanced Studies Visiting Fellow.

By 1667 when Margaret Cavendish’s biography of her husband, Life of the Thrice Noble, High and Puissant Prince William Cavendish, Duke, Marquess, and Earl of Newcastle; Earl of Ogle; Viscount Mansfield; and Baron of Bolsover, of Ogle, Bothal and Hepple … was published, she was already an established print author with a staggering number of titles to her name. Those works ranged across a variety of genres and modes from poetry and prose fiction, to plays, oratory, letters and philosophy. Her reputation as a print author rested upon them, in particular the elaborate and defensive paratexts written mostly by herself and her husband (Newcastle) addressing the public debate about her authorship. A lot has been written about the desire for fame that drove Cavendish’s presentation of herself as a print author, royalist and wife. In this public lecture, Dr Barnes will discuss how Life of Newcastle makes a pointed intervention in the historical account of the English civil war being promoted in publications of the 1650s and 1660s.

Dr Diana Barnes is Lecturer in English Literary Studies at the University of New England. She was previously a Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of Queensland (2013-2017). From 2010 to 2013, she was a Chief Investigator on the ARC Discovery project, ‘Continuities and Changes in the History of European Women’s Letter Writing.’ Dr Barnes is the recipient of a wide range of international scholarships, including, most recently, the James M. Osborne Fellowship in English and History, Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library, Yale University (2014); S. Ernest Sprott Fellowship, University of Melbourne 2012-13); and an Australian Academy of the Humanities Travelling Fellowship (2009). Dr Barnes is the author of a well-received monograph, Epistolary Community in Print, 1580-1664 (Ashgate, 2013), and a range of book chapters and peer-reviewed articles related to her interests in gender, community, emotion in early modern English literature. She is currently working on two major book projects, ‘‘The Politics of Civility: Historicising Early Modern Genres of Community’ and ‘Gender and Stoicism in Early Modern Literature’.

18:00 - PUBLIC TALK - Staying in touch across distance: 100 years of Italian-Australian migration Website | More Information
A public lecture by Professor Loretta Baldassar, Anthropology and Sociology, UWA.

Loretta Baldassar's research and teaching areas include migration, transnational families and Australian society. Loretta initiated migration studies in Anthropology when she became a staff member in 1995. Since then she has contributed to the development of this research and teaching into a core area of expertise at UWA through several initiatives. These include co-founding the Migration, Mobilities and Belonging MoB Network and the WA Migration Research Network (MRN), as well as the funding and appointment of a Cassamarca Lectureship in Italian migration studies, an ARC Linkage Postdoctoral Fellowship on Italian migration in WA and an EU Marie Curie Postdoctoral Fellowship on Transnational Families. Loretta has supervised a steady stream of postgraduate research students working on migration related topics. She is currently working on two ARC Discovery projects: Ageing and New Media and Mobile Transitions.

This lecture is part of a year-long series that celebrates the 90th Anniversary of Italian Studies at UWA

2019 marks the 90th anniversary of the teaching of Italian language and culture at The University of Western Australia.

In 1929, Francesco Vanzetti, an idiosyncratic and popular Venetian, offered the first courses in Italian. This was the first appointment of a lecturer in Italian in any Australian university.

This lecture series, supported by the Institute of Advanced Studies and by Italian Studies in the UWA School of Humanities, celebrates aspects of Italian language and culture, past and present.
Thursday 17
19:30 - PERFORMANCE - UWA Music presents: Main Stage | Culmination More Information
The outstanding ability of our emerging artists is celebrated as three young performers compete in the finals of the prestigious VOSE Concerto Competition. The evening's program is completed with Lili Boulanger's powerful lament Du fond de l'abîme.

BARBER Violin Concerto No. 1 (Mvt 1), soloist Olivia Bartlett

DORMAN Piccolo Concerto, soloist Chelsea Davis

KOPPEL Toccata for Marimba, Vibraphone and Orchestra, soloists Carissa Soares and Jet Kye Chong

INTERVAL

BERLIOZ Roman Carnival Overture, Op. 9

LILI BOULANGER Psalm 130: Du fond de l'abîme (WA Premiere)

Tickets from $18

tickets.perthconcerthall.com.au
Friday 18
13:00 - PERFORMANCE - UWA Music presents: Lunchtime Concert | Music Student's Society Takeover: Furniture Movers More Information
Be transported from the everyday by our free lunchtime concert series, featuring the best musical talent from with the UWA Conservatorium of Music and around the country.

In a concert not to be missed, the UWA Music Student's Society takes over this week's lunchtime concert to present the Furniture Movers, a collective of WA's most talented tertiary percussion students performing music from around the world.

Free entry, no bookings required.
Saturday 19
9:00 - CONFERENCE - Mental Health in the Medieval and Early Modern World : Perth Medieval and Renaissance Group/UWA Centre for Medieval and Early Modern Studies Annual Conference Website | More Information
Modern stereotypes abound regarding how mental health was perceived during the medieval and early modern period ranging from mental illness being caused by sin to the idea that the attainment of mental well-being could only be achieved through the balancing of the bodily humours. But mental health was a more complex and expansive subject of discourse throughout the period that was widely explored in medical treatises, religious tracts and sermons, and prominent in art and literature, which speaks to a more subtle understanding of the human mental state.

This conference aims to look at both the changing and continuing perceptions of mental health throughout the medieval and early modern period.

10:00 - EVENT - Art Upmarket - Sat 19th Oct 2019 : Connecting art lovers with WA's best artists Website | More Information
Art Upmarket is all about connecting art lovers with Perth’s best artists. Meet the artists and purchase art directly from them on the day. Fill your home with local art. The market will showcase a curated selection of more than 55 of Perth’s most talented artists in Winthrop Hall.

Saturday 19th October 2019 – 10am-4pm

Free entry and parking. Venue is easily accessible.

Venue: The University of Western Australia’s Winthrop Hall and Undercroft, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley 6009

For more information please visit: www.perthupmarket.com.au www.instagram.com/artupmarket #artupmarket https://www.facebook.com/events/1814055352028211/

10:00 - CONFERENCE - TEDxUWA 2019: New Frontiers : TEDxUWA is back with an exciting event dedicated to ideas worth spreading! Website | More Information
Immerse yourself in the innovative ideas and one-of-a-kind stories that are important to the community at the University of Western Australia - and beyond!

At this year’s annual conference, TEDxUWA has brought together a line-up of brilliant speakers that will push the frontiers between what we know and understand.

TEDxUWA 2019: New Frontiers is a chance to take an active part in important discussions that matter to students, alumni, educators, and anyone with a curious mind. Whether you’re interested in finding your identity or minimising waste for the future of our environment, these talks showcase fascinating ideas that will challenge and inspire you.

10:00 - WORKSHOP - Become a WA frog scientist : Join us for a free workshop to help conserve frogs in Australian cities. Website | More Information
Love frogs? Keen to observe WA’s very own motorbike frog and contribute to meaningful science?

We’re looking for citizen scientists to join us for a series of free workshops that will help conserve frogs in Australian cities.

During the workshops you’ll learn how to conduct field surveys using the CAUL Urban Wildlife app. We’ll then visit nearby sites where you will put your newfound skills to the test during a practice frog survey.

The CAUL Urban Wildlife app is available on Android and iPhone, so simply attend one of our three workshops, bring your device and jump to it! If possible, please download the app in advance of the workshop: https://nespurban.edu.au/platforms/caul-urban-wildlife-app/.

Workshop times and locations

Saturday, October 19: 10am–12pm at UWA Crawley campus, Woolnough Lecture Theatre, Geology and Geography Building.

12pm–2pm at UWA Crawley campus, Woolnough Lecture Theatre, Geology and Geography Building.

Sunday, October 20: 10am–12pm at ECU Joondalup Campus, Building 7, room 103.

14:00 - PERFORMANCE - UWA Music presents: Chamber Music Festival | Emerging Artists Concerts More Information
Join us for an immersive weekend celebrating the finest chamber music ever written. Brought to you by a stellar cast of musicians, including national and international artists as well as Western Australia’s finest emerging talent.

Come enjoy performances of emerging artists from the UWA Conservatorium of Music as they present a delightful smorgasbord of Chamber delights!

Concert 1 Sat 19 Oct | 2pm | Eileen Joyce Studio

Concert 2 Sat 19 Oct | 4.30pm | Eileen Joyce Studio

Concert 3 Sun 20 Oct | 12.30pm | Eileen Joyce Studio

Single tickets $5

Festival passes available

trybooking.com/BFQEY

15:00 - PERFORMANCE - UWA Music presents: Chamber Music Festival | Intercurrent Presents New Waves Website | More Information
Join us for an immersive weekend celebrating the finest chamber music ever written. Brought to you by a stellar cast of musicians, including national and international artists as well as Western Australia’s finest emerging talent.

In this concert UWA Ensemble in Residence, Intercurrent, presents a selection of works by Olivia Davies, Hannah Lash and Lachlan Skipworth including the World Premiere of a new work by UWA Composition Graduate Nate Wood.

Single tickets: $20 Standard | $15 Concessions

Festival passes available

trybooking.com/BFQEY

19:00 - PERFORMANCE - UWA Music presents: Chamber Music Festival | Smalley & Reich Website | More Information
Join us for an immersive weekend celebrating the finest chamber music ever written. Brought to you by a stellar cast of musicians, including national and international artists as well as Western Australia’s finest emerging talent.

In this performance an exceptional ensemble of musicians led by pianist Adam Pinto come together to perform Monody and Movement for Flute by Roger Smalley and Steve Reich's virtuosic Quartet for two pianos and two percussion.

Featuring Emily Clements, Emily Green-Armytage, Adam Tan and Paul Tanner.

Single tickets: $20 Standard | $15 Concessions Festival passes available

trybooking.com/BFQEY

Please join us for a free pre-concert talk in the Tunley Lecture Theatre commencing at 6.30pm.
Sunday 20
14:30 - PERFORMANCE - UWA Music presents: Chamber Music Festival | Blackwood Website | More Information
Join us for an immersive weekend celebrating the finest chamber music ever written. Brought to you by a stellar cast of musicians, including national and international artists as well as Western Australia’s finest emerging talent.

Iain Grandage’s Blackwood is a beautiful work for voice, clarinet and piano inspired by the unique landscape of Western Australia and with evocative poetry by WA poet and musician Kevin Gillam. Don’t miss your chance to hear this work performed once again by the very musicians it was written for, Sara Macliver (soprano), Allan Meyer (clarinet) and Graeme Gilling (piano).

Single Tickets: $20 Standard | $15 Concessions Festival Passes available

trybooking.com/BFQEY

Please join us for a pre-concert talk in the Tunley Lecture Theatre commencing at 2pm.

16:00 - PERFORMANCE - UWA Music presents: Chamber Music Festival | Mendelssohn's Octet Website | More Information
Join us for an immersive weekend celebrating the finest chamber music ever written. Brought to you by a stellar cast of musicians, including national and international artists as well as Western Australia’s finest emerging talent.

Composed when he was just 16, Mendelssohn’s vivacious Octet in E flat major Op 20 is a masterpiece for double string quartet. Join Irwin Street Collective Artist in Residence, Catherine Jones, plus an ensemble of UWA staff, students and graduates to experience this magnificent work.

Single Tickets: $20 Standard | $15 Concessions

Festival passes available

trybooking.com/BFQEY

17:00 - PERFORMANCE - UWA Music presents: Chamber Music Festival | Innovation Chamber More Information
Join us for an immersive weekend celebrating the finest chamber music ever written. Brought to you by a stellar cast of musicians, including national and international artists as well as Western Australia’s finest emerging talent.

UWA’s thriving community of emerging composers will work closely with celebrated composer James Ledger, to create new and imaginative works for voice, clarinet and piano. The works will use texts about the Australian landscape by WA writers selected by UWA’s Creative Writing Department. Who will win this year’s Dorothy Ellen Ransom Prize in Musical Composition, vote for your favourite new work in the People’s Choice Award and enjoy a new work by Brock Stannard-Brown.

Single tickets $5

Festival passes available

trybooking.com/BFQEY

19:00 - PERFORMANCE - UWA Music presents: Chamber Music Festival | Catherine Jones and Friends Website | More Information
Join us for an immersive weekend celebrating the finest chamber music ever written. Brought to you by a stellar cast of musicians, including national and international artists as well as Western Australia’s finest emerging talent.

UWA graduate and Baroque cellist Catherine Jones enjoys an international and varied career, performing and recording both as a soloist and with ensembles. In this concert she’ll join the Irwin Street Collective to perform works by Beethoven, Hummel and a new commission by honours student Jet Kye Chong.

FREE CONCERT - proudly supported by the UWA Institute of Advanced Studies

Bookings required: trybooking.com/BFQEY

Please join us at 6.30pm for a free pre-concert talk in the Tunley Lecture Theatre.
Tuesday 22
10:00 - PUBLIC LECTURE - Eye Health and Research Lectures : Free community lectures at the Lions Eye Institute Website | More Information
The Lions Eye Institute will host 4 free public lectures about eye health and eye research: 10am Prof Bill Morgan: 'Adventures in the Pressure Space' - the optic nerve in Glaucoma and in outer space. 11.30am Dr Andrea Ang: 'Can I get rid of my glasses Doc?' - LASIK and refractive surgery 1pm Dr Hessom Razavi: 'Journey into the Eye' - looking at the eye and disease through virtual reality 2.30pm Dr Angus Turner: 'Country eyes' - how to give sight-saving treatment away from the city lights

10:00 - EVENT - The Great Song Cycle: Mastering the art of doing everything you love, and getting away with it : Masterclass with musician and author, Joanna Wallfisch Website | More Information
Internationally acclaimed musician and author, Joanna Wallfisch, visits IAS to present a masterclass, performance and discussion on how to balance and combine the concepts of career, vocation and one’s life passions. A songwriting and vocal coach, she will offer tips of conveying story through the written word and also through music.

In 2016 Joanna released her third album on Sunnyside Records. She was living in NYC at the time, feeling jaded by the thankless hustle of a musician’s life and sorely aware of the sacrifices she’d made to live it. In a moment of inspiration she decided to recall her adventurous side and head to California to tour her new album, usurping the usual cars and buses and instead travel by bicycle. She called the tour “The Great Song Cycle”. What transpired was a concert tour turned effervescent. Not only did it alter her perception of her own strength, physical and emotional resources, but the journey inspired her to write her debut memoir, published by UWA Press, and record and release her latest record ‘Far Away From Any Place Called Home’, thus combing her passion for adventure with her career as a musician. The story and music have since taken her around the world, and she is now in Australia to tour the book and album... by bicycle, of course!

Joanna’s unique musical background shines through in her own compositional style, evoking her classical routes with her love of jazz, art-song, folk and pop, pushing boundaries of genre and stylistic expectations. She is a master in the art of live vocal looping and as a multi-instrumentalist plays baritone ukulele, piano, flute, Indian shruti box, kalimba and melodica. Her music defies genre classification as she effortlessly imbues her songs with nuances of jazz, classical, art-song, and folk, carrying her “clear-eyed poetry” (Boston Globe) and “striking vocals” (Hothouse). Her songwriting extends beyond just lyrics and melody - Joanna also arranges for ensembles including string quartets, winds, a cappella voices and more. She first studied to be a painter at Central Saint Martins, London. This led her to Paris, where she sang on the bridges of the Seine with the “Rene Miller Wedding Band”. Following this formative time she did a masters in jazz at Guildhall School of Music and Drama. In 2012 she moved to New York City where she forged an indelible musical path, appearing and collaborating with musicians including Dan Tepfer, Wynton said, “overflowed with creativity and musical resources entitled “Far Away From Any Place Called Home”.

18:00 - PUBLIC TALK - The Last Indigenous People of Europe, but for how long? Website | More Information
A public lecture by Steven G.M. Schilizzi, Professor of Environmental and Agricultural Economics, Faculty of Science, UWA.

Sápmi, or Lapland, sits at the extreme north of Scandinavia, mostly above the Arctic Circle, and straddles four countries. Its people, the Sami (formerly the Lapps), have inhabited this land for several millennia. Yet today, their future as a people is threatened. Yes, there has been a revival of their sense of identity, of their culture and their customs; but paradoxically, unlike the past, the present danger comes perhaps more from within than from without. The new “black gold rush” in the Barents Sea is creating as many threats as opportunities, while economic and environmental pressures, with government policies, are undermining the very foundations of their culture and of their social norms.

In this talk, Steven will share, with pictures and videos, his experience in Sápmi where he spent part of the winter 2019. He was lucky enough to stay with actively engaged Sami people, in their homes in Kautokeino and Karasjok, their two main townships. He learnt first-hand about their current situation; their collective and personal histories; their treatment by their respective governments (with parallels to indigenous Australians); the status of their languages; and, given the threats and opportunities created by the new “black gold rush” in the Barents Sea, the challenges facing their cultural survival in the 21st century.

Steven Schilizzi is Professor of Environmental and Agricultural Economics in the Faculty of Science at UWA. His work, both in Australia and in Europe, currently focuses on how public agencies can incentivize private landholders to supply environmental services (like biodiversity protection or reduced pollution into waterways), and on how equity concerns can be rigorously incorporated into environmental policies in trade-offs with other policy objectives. He has authored or co-authored more than 120 scientific articles, 20 book chapters and 4 books including 'Natural Resources and Environmental Justice'.

18:00 - PUBLIC TALK - The Last Indigenous People of Europe, but for how long? Website | More Information
A public lecture by Steven G.M. Schilizzi, Professor of Environmental and Agricultural Economics, Faculty of Science, UWA

Sápmi, or Lapland, sits at the extreme north of Scandinavia, mostly above the Arctic Circle, and straddles four countries. Its people, the Sami (formerly the Lapps), have inhabited this land for several millennia. Yet today, their future as a people is threatened. Yes, there has been a revival of their sense of identity, of their culture and their customs; but paradoxically, unlike the past, the present danger comes perhaps more from within than from without. The new “black gold rush” in the Barents Sea is creating as many threats as opportunities, while economic and environmental pressures, with government policies, are undermining the very foundations of their culture and of their social norms.

In this talk, Steven will share, with pictures and videos, his experience in Sápmi where he spent part of the winter 2019. He was lucky enough to stay with actively engaged Sami people, in their homes in Kautokeino and Karasjok, their two main townships. He learnt first-hand about their current situation; their collective and personal histories; their treatment by their respective governments (with parallels to indigenous Australians); the status of their languages; and, given the threats and opportunities created by the new “black gold rush” in the Barents Sea, the challenges facing their cultural survival in the 21st century.
Wednesday 23
18:00 - EVENT - Taking the pulse of Italy today: a creative presence in Europe and in Australia Website | More Information
A public lecture by H.E. Francesca Tardioli, Ambassador of Italy in Australia

This lecture is part of a year-long series that celebrates the 90th Anniversary of Italian Studies at UWA

2019 marks the 90th anniversary of the teaching of Italian language and culture at The University of Western Australia.

In 1929, Francesco Vanzetti, an idiosyncratic and popular Venetian, offered the first courses in Italian. This was the first appointment of a lecturer in Italian in any Australian university.

This lecture series, supported by the Institute of Advanced Studies and by Italian Studies in the UWA School of Humanities, celebrates aspects of Italian language and culture, past and present.

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