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Today's date is Thursday, April 02, 2020
Events for the public
 August 2019
Thursday 15
15:00 - SEMINAR - Centre for Muslim States and Societies Seminar Series 2019 : India's Gamble in Kashmir: Implications for Stability and Militancy More Information
On 5 August 2019, in a highly controversial decision, the Indian government revoked the special status given to the Indian-administered, Muslim-majority Kashmir. This move brought an end to the internal autonomy given to this disputed region under the Indian Constitution, sparking fears of increased instability, if not confrontations, in the region. This seminar by Professor Samina Yasmeen, Director at the Centre for the Muslim States and Societies, will assess the implications of revoking special status for Kashmir for regional and global stability as well as militancy in the region.

Professor Samina Yasmeen AM is a teacher and researcher in UWA’s School of Social Sciences, and director and founder of the University’s Centre for the Muslim States and Societies. She focuses on understanding perceptions of and by Muslims and Islam around the world and seeks to make an impact on Australian and global politics. She is a specialist in political and strategic development in South Asia and the role of Islam in World Politics. She has published articles on the position of Pakistani and Middle Eastern women, the role of Muslims in Australia and India_Pakistan relations.

ENTRY: Free, but please RSVP to cmss-ss@uwa.edu.au

16:00 - SEMINAR - Archaeology Seminar Series : The future of archaeology and heritage politics in an era of Belt and Road More Information
Incorporating two thirds of the world's population and more than 70 countries, the Belt and Road Initiative has been described as the most significant and far-reaching initiative that China has ever put forward. Framed as a 'revival' of the Silk Roads for the 21st century, Belt and Road rests on a compelling, romanticised idea of pre-modern globalisation; a story of peaceful trade, of East meets West and of civilisations in harmonious dialogue. Such Silk Road themes were fashioned by explorers and scholars in Central Asia in the late 19th century, and in the aftermath of World War II and Cold War the Silk Road emerged as a platform for fostering intercultural dialogue, peace and tolerance. Today Beijing takes up such themes for its own strategic purposes and to link continents and partners by land and sea. This presentation explores how the political economy of Belt and Road connectivity is transforming long-standing ideas about culture and history, reframing and displacing discourses of archaeology and heritage rooted in national and ethnic categories with a language of routes and shared pasts. Belt and Road is creating new ways of imagining Eurasia's past, giving visibility to much neglected themes and regions; but, in doing so, it is also transforming the politics of the past, entangling academics and cultural policy institutions in new, unfamiliar forces. The talk considers such issues and the degree to which GIS, world heritage and archaeological collaborations are unwitting agents in the accumulation of new forms of state power.

Bio: Tim Winter is a Professor of Critical Heritage Studies and Australian Research Council Fellow at UWA. He is the former President of the Association of Critical Heritage STudies and has conducted research across a number of countries, primarily in Asia. Interdisciplinary in nature, his work addresses how the past comes to be mobilised in the present for political and economic purposes.

Friday 16
11:00 - SEMINAR - Construction and Infrastructure in the Philippines at the Turn of the Sixteenth Century More Information
Infrastructure and construction are the two physical aspects of village life discussed in this seminar. Roads and trails, where they existed, were located near or within towns since the lack of wheeled vehicles and the availability of waterways for easy travel by boat made these unsuited and undesirable for long distance travel. For towns to be viable, they needed supplies of fresh water for drinking and clean water for cooking. A location near natural springs or shallow sources of water for access by wells was essential. Construction required both wood and tools and those with the expertise to use them. The wood of magnificent trees supplied the material for posts and beams, and the grasses, palms and bamboo the material for cladding. Temporary structures were built in the fields or in the forest to provide shelter, and in the trees for defense, but it was the house which provided a permanent home. Discussed are the parts of the house and its construction from planning and measurement to completion. Emphasis will also be on the sources which provided the needed information, and on an explanation of the linguistic changes needed to relate terms across languages.

13:00 - PERFORMANCE - UWA Music presents: Lunchtime Concert | UWA Guitar Studio Website | More Information
Be transported from the everyday by our free lunchtime concert series, featuring the best musical talent from with the UWA Conservatorium of Music and around the country.

This week the UWA Guitar Studio will present a free concert of solo and chamber repertoire, featuring some very special works including Bill Kannengieser’s rarely performed 'Gongan' for prepared guitar quartet.

UWA's guitar students take the stage this week to present a beautiful program of solo and chamber works for the guitar.

Free entry, no bookings required.

13:00 - EVENT - Activist Writing: Balancing Risk and Safety : What risks do academics, activists and artists take in their work? NTEU Bluestocking Week panel discussion More Information
Bluestocking Week (12 - 16 August) is an initiative recognising women in the workplace. The UWA NTEU Branch will host a panel discussion on the risks academics, activists and artists take with their writing.

Panelists:

Zainab Syed (poet, producer, educator)

Dr Liana Joy Christensen (writer, editor, academic)

Dr Sally Knowles (activist, artist, academic)

with a message from Renée Pettitt-Schipp, winner of the WA Premier's Book Award for an Emerging Writer.

Facilitator: Dr Sanna Peden (NTEU UWA Branch President)

16:30 - COURSE - UWA Music presents: Accelerate! Guitars More Information
Accelerate is UWA's elite performance-training program for students in Years 10 to 12 who are looking to take their playing to the next level. Students will participate in weekly workshops, masterclasses and rehearsals culminating in a performance on 12 September.

The program runs on Friday afternoons 4.30 to 6.30 from August 16.

Further information at music.uwa.edu.au

17:00 - Masterclass - UWA Music presents: Open Percussion Masterclass by Emmanuel Séjourné More Information
French musician Emmanuel Séjourné is one of the world’s most influential percussion performers, composers and pedagogues. Head of Percussion at the Strasbourg Academy of Music/ Conservatory, he has delivered masterclasses on six continents, specialising in mallet instrument technique.

Percussionists and percussion teachers are invited to join Séjourné for an illuminating masterclass on mallet instrument pedagogy, pedalling techniques on vibraphone and sight-reading on mallet instruments.

Free entry - bookings essential

trybooking.com/BATEA
Sunday 18
15:00 - PERFORMANCE - UWA Music presents: Centre Stage | Emmanuel Séjourné and Sylvie Reynaert with Piñata Percussion More Information
Celebrated French virtuosi Emmanuel Séjourné and Sylive Reynaert (Strasbourg Conservatoire) perform with Piñata Percussion. The program will feature Séjourné's popular compositions for marimba and vibraphone alongside exciting international repertoire.

Tickets from $10

trybooking.com/BASXD
Tuesday 20
12:50 - SEMINAR - Political Science and International Relations : PhD Seminar Series 2019 More Information
Presentation 1: Title: Assembling, Deploying, and Contesting Social Impact Bonds in Australia

Speaker: Jacob Broom

Research Proposal Presentation)

Presentation 2: Title: The Political Economy of Post-Crisis Financial Stability Governance: A case study of macroprudential framework implementation in Australia

Speaker: Peter Thomsett

(Chapter Presentation)

18:00 - PUBLIC LECTURE - Launch of Big Issues for Western Australia Website | More Information
Launch of the UWA Public Policy Institute's new publication - Big Issues for Western Australia

The UWA Public Policy Institute is pleased to announce the launch of a major new publication, Big Issues for Western Australia.

We have gathered the opinions and practical suggestions of key WA figures across a wide range of issues, which have all been collated into a new publication to be officially launched on Tuesday 20 August 2019.

Big Issues for Western Australia gets opinion formers to look at concerns that are vital for the future success of the state’s economy, communities, public services and social cohesion. Contributors are focused on old and new problems, fresh ideas and approaches, and crucially, the use of evidence and expertise to set policy choices, drawing on examples of what works elsewhere that can have traction in WA.

Join us at this launch where you will have the opportunity to hear from a panel of our contributors and the UWA Public Policy Institute’s work to support evidence-based public policy in WA.

Copies of the publication will be available at the event.

Panel members:

* Ms Amanda Hunt (CEO, Uniting Care West)

* Ms Rabia Siddique (international humanitarian lawyer, keynote speaker, author)

* The Honourable Professor Stephen Smith (Chair of UWA Public Policy Institute Advisory Board)

* The Honourable Simone McGurk MLA (Minister for Child Protection; Women's Interests; Prevention of Family and Domestic Violence; Community Services)

19:30 - PERFORMANCE - UWA Music presents: Centre Stage | The Irwin Street Collective with Miriam Allan More Information
Soprano Miriam Allan's "sublime singing" (Gramophone, 2017) has been enjoyed around the world. As UWA Institute of Advance Studies Visiting Fellow she joins Sara Macliver, Cecilia Sun and Shaun Lee-Chen for a special free concert.

Free entry, bookings essential.

trybooking.com/BASXE
Thursday 22
15:00 - SEMINAR - CMSS Seminar : Family Violence and Your Visa More Information
Family violence and violence against women remain a major issue globally and in Australia. This affects migrant communities, including Muslim families, in Australia. In this presentation, Rachel Mathewson will outline the Home Affairs provisions and support provided for visa-holders affected by family violence. The information is practical and explains when and how people contact the Department and the types of information required.

Rachel Mathewson is the Assistant Director of the WA Community Engagement team with the Department of Home Affairs. She has worked in the Department since 2007 in a variety of roles from Learning and Development, Student Visas and Refugee and Humanitarian.

ENTRY: Free, but please RSVP to cmss-ss@uwa.edu.au

16:00 - SEMINAR - Past sea-level changes, environments and coastal demography. Is archaeology missing some critical factors? And if so, why? More Information
Abstract: This talk has three main sections: 1. An outline of the main sedimentary processes controlling coastal and marine archaeological sites, with a focus on Australia's NW shelf. This is relevant because it is a critical control upon much archaeological work in NW Australia, but it is poorly dealt with or, at worst, ignored. 2. A critique of the ongoing mis-use of radiocarbon dates as data in studies of past human demography. 3. An analysis of why these and other critical issues can become overlooked by some in archaeology, with a view of how it can be resolved to improve the quality of everyone's research.

Bio: In western Europe and Australia, Piers Larcombe has had 30 years of fun in sedimentary research, trying to understand how sedimentary systems work. His aim is that research and applied studies should use more information about the relevant physical systems.

18:00 - PUBLIC TALK - Women, Inequality and the Butterfly Effect : The 2019 Grace Vaughan Memorial Lecture by Antoinette Kennedy AO Website | More Information
The “butterfly effect” was coined in 1972 by Edward Lorenz in a talk titled “does the flap of a butterfly’s wings in Brazil set off a tornado in Texas?” It models how a small action can have a significant impact.

In this year’s Grace Vaughan Memorial Lecture, the Honourable Antoinette Kennedy AO, Western Australia’s first and longest serving female judge, will speak about the history of women in the law and her own history and what that has taught her about the many issues faced by women. The progressive act of taking opportunity and then using that position to speak truth for those that are voiceless is a feature of Antoinette’s life, and the essence of this year’s Grace Vaughan Memorial Lecture. Throughout her career, Antoinette’s primary interest was not what Governments could do for women - though she regards this as important - but what women could do for each other if they were properly informed and had the will. In particular, Antoinette is interested to explore what can be achieved when women support each other, have their consciousness raised, the freedom to look at issues outside of the male gaze and each woman has a power base consisting of every other woman.

Her talk will explore this concept as it applies to issues that particularly concern women and girls, in particular, family violence, the victimisation of girls through paedophilia, and how ignorance of this has left parents and the community undereducated and less able to protect girls. Finally, Antoinette will discuss the #Metoo movement as the most recent iteration of the women’s equality movement.

The Honourable Antoinette Kennedy AO was the first and longest serving female judge in Western Australia, serving for 25 years, and despite her retirement, remains the longest serving judge in the state. She was the first woman appointed as Chief Judge of the District Court (the first female head of a jurisdiction in WA and only the third in Australia) in 2004. She was made an Officer of the Order of Australia (AO) and was inducted into the WA Women’s Hall of Fame in 2012.

The annual Grace Vaughan Memorial Lecture lecture commemorates the life and achievements of Grace Vaughan, a social worker, social activist and parliamentarian, who was dedicated to the improvement of life at all levels and had a deep commitment to Australia’s participation in the Asian region and to ensuring women’s full participation in society. The lecture is presented by the Australian Association of Social Workers, the Institute of Advanced Studies at The University of Western Australia and Department of Communities Western Australia.
Friday 23
11:00 - SEMINAR - UWA Linguistics Seminar : The challenges of community- led language and country maintenance More Information
What are the realities and challenges of community-led, on-country language-revitalisation/maintenance of Martu languages in the Western Desert today?

After graduating from the ANU in 2015 with Honours in Language Studies, Duke (Garry Earl-Spurr) moved to the East Pilbara in mid-2016 to work as an applied linguist for Kanyirninpa Jukurrpa (KJ) – a Martu organisation that aims to keep country and culture strong, and to build sustainable Martu communities. Since then, KJ’s language program has been steadily gaining momentum as language increasingly becomes integrated into all facets of KJ’s work.

Duke will speak about the realities and challenges of working as an applied linguist and a part of KJ’s Martu language team on the revitalisation and maintenance of Martu languages in the Western Desert. He will discuss the integral role of language in underpinning the fundamental and amorphously intertwined Martu aspirations of strong culture, right-way land-management, and sustainable community development.

Key themes will include: Language policy & management; working and learning together in a cross-cultural setting; language and caring for country; language and cultural empowerment; language and sustainable development in the Western Desert; intergenerational transmission; decolonisation; and Western Desert Languages.

13:00 - PERFORMANCE - UWA Music presents: Lunchtime Concert | Irwin Street Collective and UWA Voice: Handel's German Arias More Information
Be transported from the everyday by our free lunchtime concert series, featuring the best musical talent from with the UWA Conservatorium of Music and around the country.

This week we welcome back the ever-popular Irwin Street Collective in conjunction with UWA's talented voice students to present Handel's German arias

Free entry, no bookings required.

14:30 - SEMINAR - Anthropology and Sociology Seminar Series : PhD Proposals More Information
Presentation 1:

In the wake of choice: Perth’s autonomous women’s engagement with the discourse of choice via post-abortion narratives presented by Dorinda ’t Hart.

Pro-abortion discourse generally presents abortion as an unproblematic event in the course of a woman’s reproductive life. However, pre-field discussions with women confirm that an abortion experience is a significant episode in an individual’s life and not easily forgotten. Further, current research tends to present some women as autonomous agents who have unobstructed access to abortion services while empirically examining barriers to access for those women who are considered less autonomous. However, this research fails to examine the intersection of women’s perceived autonomy and the internalisation of social norms that guide and inform a woman’s abortion decision. Via this research project, I aim to engage with women’s post-abortion narratives, shared through in-depth interviews throughout Perth. Through the recruitment of those women who consider themselves to be autonomous, I seek to understand each woman’s engagement with the discourse of choice and their ongoing negotiation of meaning of their abortion experience.

Dorinda ’t Hart is a PhD student in Anthropology and Sociology.

Presentation 2: Growing older overseas: How older Vietnam-born people are experiencing ageing and aged care in Australia presented by Hien Thi Nguyen.

Older Vietnam-born people (OVP) make up the sixth largest migrant community in Australia; however, they are under-researched. To help address this gap in the literature, this study will examine OVP’s experiences of ageing and aged care, using qualitative research methods, including ethnographic interviews, participant observation, social media fieldwork, video recording, and social network analysis tools guided by an interpretive phenomenological paradigm and grounded theory. The central research question is “How are Vietnam-born parent migrants and parent visitors experiencing ageing and aged care in Australia and what is the role of their local, virtual and distant support networks?”. The research will be conducted in Perth and Melbourne, cities which have a large number of older Vietnam-born residents (ABS, 2016b). The research will target two groups: (i) parent migrants and (ii) parent visitors that represent a mix of past and recent Vietnamese migration to Australia.

Hien Thi Nguyen is a PhD student in the Anthropology and Sociology Discipline. Her research interests include domestic and transnational migration, ageing and aged care, women and gender and new media.
Monday 26
18:00 - PUBLIC TALK - Why "home" matters the most for people on the move Website | More Information
A public lecture by Paolo Boccagni, Associate Professor, Sociology, University of Trento, Italy and 2019 UWA Institute of Advanced Studies Visiting Fellow.

All across social sciences and humanities, "home" has emerged as a unique research topic, despite its inherent ambiguity, as it bridges a variety of divides - public vs private, material vs immaterial, descriptive vs prescriptive, "us" vs "them". However, under conditions of displacement and large-scale migration home is no more what it used to be. From an apparently natural background to people's lives, it turns into something to be achieved, or recovered, from scratch. Struggling for an adequate and ideally better home, successfully or not, is a process that irremediably parallels migrant life trajectories. Likewise, retaining some aspects of all that used to stand for home, while adapting to the views, emotions and practices associated with home in the countries of destination, is critical to migrant and refugee integration over time. Whether for practical purposes or in a more existential sense, coping with home anew is part and parcel of the migrant condition. Parallel to that, home - as a set of emplaced relationships and emotions, not just a place - is a key analytical tool for researching migrant trajectories and the attendant social transformations. Based on an original sociological understanding of home, and on the European Research Council HOMInG project, this lecture invites you to appreciate the significance of home for displaced and migrant people, as an often unaccomplished experience and as a balancing act between past, present and future. The methodological implications and the policy relevance of research on home and migration will also be discussed, against the backdrop of “homing” as a universal and often unmet human need.

18:00 - PUBLIC LECTURE - Anthropology and Sociology Public Lecture More Information
All across social sciences and humanities, “home” has emerged as a unique research topic, despite its inherent ambiguity, as it bridges a variety of divides - public vs private, material vs immaterial, descriptive vs prescriptive, “us” vs “them”. However, under conditions of displacement and large-scale migration home is no more what it used to be. From an apparently natural background to people’s lives, it turns into something to be achieved, or recovered, from scratch. Struggling for an adequate and ideally better home, successfully or not, is a process that irremediably parallels migrant life trajectories. Likewise, retaining some aspects of all that used to stand for home, while adapting to the views, emotions and practices associated with home in the countries of destination, is critical to migrant and refugee integration over time. Whether for practical purposes or in a more existential sense, coping with home anew is part and parcel of the migrant condition. Parallel to that, home - as a set of emplaced relationships and emotions, not just a place - is a key analytical tool for researching migrant trajectories and the attendant social transformations. Based on an original sociological understanding of home, and on the European Research Council HOMInG project, this lecture invites you to appreciate the significance of home for displaced and migrant people, as an often unaccomplished experience and as a balancing act between past, present and future. The methodological implications and the policy relevance of research on home and migration will also be discussed, against the backdrop of “homing” as a universal and often unmet human need.

Paolo Boccagni’s main areas of expertise are international migration, transnationalism, social welfare, care, diversity and home. His current research is on home-making and home-feeling processes, as a critical question for the everyday negotiation of boundaries between native and foreign-born populations. As the Principal Investigator of the European Research Council Starting Grant project HOMInG and of MIUR (Ministero dell’Istruzione, dell’Università e della Ricerca) HOASI (Home and Asylum Seekers in Italy), Paolo is leading a team of seven postdoctoral researcher fellows, doing multi-sited fieldwork on the experience of home among migrants and refugees in nine different countries. Based on these large-scale collaborative projects, Paolo is elaborating on “homing” as a lifelong set of processes through which individuals and groups try to make themselves at home. In recent years he has also done fieldwork on the ways of framing and approaching immigrant and refugee clients among social workers; on the lived experience and the sense of home of international students; on the built environment, material cultures and thresholds of domesticity in refugee reception initiatives.

Please RSVP online via www.ias.uwa.edu.au/lectures/boccagni
Tuesday 27
10:00 - SEMINAR - Should we say sorry? An examination of the treatment of people of Chinese cultural heritage in Western Australia between 1820s and 1970s. More Information
People of Chinese cultural heritage has been part of the history of Western Australia since the proclamation of the Swan River Colony. They in the past were subjected to certain policies, which were legal but arguably unjust in light of contemporary societal attitude towards equality and fairness. Such policies included the poll tax (also known as the “head tax”), tonnage restrictions, exclusion from goldfields, and the dictation test. The project intends to study the period from the beginning of British settlement to the time around the abolition of the White Australia Policy. Through a cross-disciplinary approach, the project intends to examine in detail, these policies and their impact on people of Chinese cultural heritage in Western Australia during that period.

People of Chinese cultural heritage were subjected to similar policies in other countries and other Australian states around the same time. In recent decades, many of these jurisdictions including New Zealand and Victoria have issued apologies for their past policies concerning their people of Chinese cultural heritage.

During the preliminary research of this project, it is apparent that there are ample literature on the people of Chinese cultural heritage and their experiences during the 1800s and 1900s in Western Australia. There are also an abundance of literature related to the apologies which have been made in the past. However, there is little evidence of any discussion on whether the policies of the governments of Western Australia towards its people of Chinese cultural heritage should be debated. From an academic point of view, it is of significance to address that.

It is worth noting that if there is ever going to be any public debate about this, such debate should be up to all West Australians and West Australians alone.

This project aims to, through a comparative approach, combine the studies of the history concerning the people of Chinese cultural heritage in Western Australia, the apologies delivered to people of Chinese cultural heritage in other jurisdictions for similar policies, and the apologies made to other groups of Australians to analyse whether an apology should or should not be made for its policies towards its people of Chinese cultural heritage in the past. It should always be remembered that this project is about examining whether or not a state apology is appropriate, not about finding ways to justify an apology.

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