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Today's date is Saturday, April 04, 2020
Events for the public
 August 2019
Monday 12
8:15 - CONFERENCE - WA Indo-Pacific Defence Conference 2019 : The WA Indo-Pacific Defence conference is the flagship defence industry and defence issues conference Website | More Information
The WA Indo-Pacific Defence conference will attract 500 delegates to a full-day event hosted at Crown Towers, Perth. This year's conference will feature expanded opportunities for exhibitors, sponsors, and visitors. This flagship conference will examine: * Partnership roles played by Indonesia, Japan, India, United Kingdom, France and the United States * Industry support for the changing operational environment * New frontiers in Defence including the evolvin grole of technology and WA's STEM agenda * Defence industry applications for WA's battery minerals and resources expertise * Key strategies outlined in the Western Australian Defence and Defence Industry Strategic Plan Ticket includes morning and afternoon tea, lunch, networking reception (5-6pm), conference program and access to exhibition space.

19:00 - PERFORMANCE - UWA Music presents: Jose Franch-Ballester in Recital More Information
The multiple award-winning Spanish clarinetist Jose Franch-Ballester has been hailed for his “technical wizardry and tireless enthusiasm” (The New York Times), his “rich, resonant tone” (Birmingham News), and his “subtle and consummate artistry” (Santa Barbara Independent). Recipient of an Avery Fisher Career Grant in 2008, and winner of both the Young Concert Artists and Astral Artists auditions, he is a solo artist and chamber musician in great demand.

UWA Music and Backun Musical Services invite you to enjoy a free recital with Jose and guest artist Gladys Chua (piano)

Program: BASSI Rigoletto Fantasy | KOVACS Shalem Alekhem v. Feidman | POULENC Sonata for Clarinet and Piano

Free entry - no bookings required

Additional free activities during Jose's visit include:

Monday 12 August

Backun Showroom – 2pm - 6pm | Tunley Lecture Theatre

Tuesday 13 August

Backun Showroom – 10am-1pm and 2pm-4pm | Tunley Lecture Theatre

Free Masterclass – 4pm – 6pm | Eileen Joyce Studio

Backun Showroom – 6-7pm | G12 | All welcome
Tuesday 13
7:30 - TALK - “The Atlantis of the North: unique records from ‘drowned landscapes’ off northern Australia” : Friends of the Library Talk Website | More Information
One of the defining attributes of modern humans is their ability to cross, navigate and systematically exploit maritime landscapes and resources. Some of the earliest indirect evidence for the maritime capabilities of people comes from the settling of the Wallacean Islands and Sahul (Australia, PNG, Tasmania). Direct evidence includes early dated occupation sites in northern Australia, fishing technologies and marine dietary assemblages from Timor Leste and Borneo, and midden and shell artefacts from North West Australia dated from 50,000 years ago. In this lecture Peter will profile research that he and his colleagues have carried out on the North West Shelf and the islands and interior of northern Australia.

Professor Peter Veth has carried out multi-decadal research on the archaeology of Aboriginal societies and their evolving land and seascapes. He has held academic positions at JCU, the ANU and UWA and been on the Executive Leadership team at AIATSIS. He has recently finished as the inaugural Chair of Kimberley Rock Art and is now the Director of the UWA Oceans Institute.

Special Collections – special viewing for members

Special Collections will be open on Tuesday 13th August 6.30pm – 7.15pm for members to view a selection of maps of the Indian and Pacific oceans held in Special Collections before the start of the talk by Peter Veth.

Future Events

“Translating a classic French novel: the problems posed by Emile Zola’s The Dream” by Dr Paul Gibbard, Lecturer European Languages and Studies is the topic for the 10th September talk.

October 8th is a special event, the presentation of the Clérambault 1710 edition from David Tunley to the Special Collections, with a performance of the work by the Conservatorium of Music Irwin Street Collective. The venue will be the Eileen Joyce Studio Conservatorium of Music.

Our final speaker for the year is Jill Benn, University Librarian and her presentation is “Library Place for Learning Space: Reflections in the Changing Nature of the Academic Library. Drinks and nibbles will be provided by the Friends of the Library after the 12th November talk.

Friends of the Grounds

Friends of the Library may be interested in events organised by the Friends of the Grounds. The film “The Making of Gardens by the Bay” on Sunday 28th July, see details below and the Annual Seddon Lecture on Thursday 1 August in the Ross Lecture Theatre, Physics Building from 6 pm to 7 pm. Tickets are free at Eventbrite or contact UWA Institute of Advanced Studies, ias@uwa.edu.au. A small donation for wine and cheese after for those attending.

13:00 - SEMINAR - Political Science and International Relations Seminar Series 2019 : Changing approaches to development aid in Africa More Information
This presentation will consider some of the emerging challenges for official development assistance (ODA) in Africa. After a brief overview of three bilateral donor programs (Australia, Denmark and UK), the new frameworks for supporting economic development will be presented. These frameworks present new challenges to donors, development partners and recipient countries, which will be discussed.

Simon White obtained his PhD from the UWA School of Political Science and International Relations in 2005. For the last 30 years he has worked as an independent consultant in economic and business development in Australia and throughout Africa and Asia.


17:00 - SEMINAR - UWA Music presents: Callaway Centre Research Seminar Series - Margaret Seares : Funding the Arts in Australia: the theory and the practice More Information
The Conservatorium of Music is a vibrant centre for research in music and music education. A thriving community of scholars is engaged in exploring the frontiers of knowledge, working on a wide range of research projects with diverse outputs.

This week, Margaret Seares discusses 'Funding the Arts in Australia: the theory and the practice'

Abstract: In 1996 American academic Mark J Schuster published an article entitled ‘Questions to Ask of a Cultural Policy: Who Should Pay? Who Should Decide?’ in the journal Culture and Policy.

This is a perennial discussion, not only in Australia, and the conclusions he reached in 1996 have changed in relevance over time. This talk will look at Schuster’s original discussion, and the realities of cultural policy and decisions over arts funding as they exist in Australia today.

This is an issue that, in one way or another, is likely to confront almost all music graduates and can also provide insights into how research funding is managed in Australia.

Bio: Emeritus Professor Margaret Seares is a former Head of the (then) School of Music, CEO of the (then) Western Australian Department for the Arts, and Chair of the Australia Council for the Arts. She has also served on the Advisory Board of the Australian Research Council and the Education Investment Fund.

Free entry - no bookings required

18:00 - PUBLIC TALK - Italy and the Invention of Luxury Website | More Information
A public lecture by Dr Catherine Kovesi, History, University of Melbourne.

That Italy and Luxury go hand in hand seems hardly noteworthy. It is a pairing at once both obvious and nebulously evocative. However Luxury has a long history, one with a rather sordid past, from which it has never entirely freed itself. And Italy is there, at the heart of the concept – from its fifteenth-century definition and first articulations, to its broader manifestations into present-day luxury brands and the untrammelled consumption of our globalized age. This lecture positions Luxury as one of the key words of our time; but a concept with paradoxes at its core and a chequered history and origins.

This lecture is part of the lecture series celebrating the 90th Anniversary of Italian Studies at UWA.

2019 marks the 90th anniversary of the teaching of Italian language and culture at The University of Western Australia. In 1929, Francesco Vanzetti, an idiosyncratic and popular Venetian, offered the first courses in Italian. This was the first appointment of a lecturer in Italian in any Australian university.

This lecture series, supported by the Institute of Advanced Studies and by Italian Studies in the UWA School of Humanities, celebrates aspects of Italian language and culture, past and present.
Thursday 15
15:00 - SEMINAR - Centre for Muslim States and Societies Seminar Series 2019 : India's Gamble in Kashmir: Implications for Stability and Militancy More Information
On 5 August 2019, in a highly controversial decision, the Indian government revoked the special status given to the Indian-administered, Muslim-majority Kashmir. This move brought an end to the internal autonomy given to this disputed region under the Indian Constitution, sparking fears of increased instability, if not confrontations, in the region. This seminar by Professor Samina Yasmeen, Director at the Centre for the Muslim States and Societies, will assess the implications of revoking special status for Kashmir for regional and global stability as well as militancy in the region.

Professor Samina Yasmeen AM is a teacher and researcher in UWA’s School of Social Sciences, and director and founder of the University’s Centre for the Muslim States and Societies. She focuses on understanding perceptions of and by Muslims and Islam around the world and seeks to make an impact on Australian and global politics. She is a specialist in political and strategic development in South Asia and the role of Islam in World Politics. She has published articles on the position of Pakistani and Middle Eastern women, the role of Muslims in Australia and India_Pakistan relations.

ENTRY: Free, but please RSVP to cmss-ss@uwa.edu.au

16:00 - SEMINAR - Archaeology Seminar Series : The future of archaeology and heritage politics in an era of Belt and Road More Information
Incorporating two thirds of the world's population and more than 70 countries, the Belt and Road Initiative has been described as the most significant and far-reaching initiative that China has ever put forward. Framed as a 'revival' of the Silk Roads for the 21st century, Belt and Road rests on a compelling, romanticised idea of pre-modern globalisation; a story of peaceful trade, of East meets West and of civilisations in harmonious dialogue. Such Silk Road themes were fashioned by explorers and scholars in Central Asia in the late 19th century, and in the aftermath of World War II and Cold War the Silk Road emerged as a platform for fostering intercultural dialogue, peace and tolerance. Today Beijing takes up such themes for its own strategic purposes and to link continents and partners by land and sea. This presentation explores how the political economy of Belt and Road connectivity is transforming long-standing ideas about culture and history, reframing and displacing discourses of archaeology and heritage rooted in national and ethnic categories with a language of routes and shared pasts. Belt and Road is creating new ways of imagining Eurasia's past, giving visibility to much neglected themes and regions; but, in doing so, it is also transforming the politics of the past, entangling academics and cultural policy institutions in new, unfamiliar forces. The talk considers such issues and the degree to which GIS, world heritage and archaeological collaborations are unwitting agents in the accumulation of new forms of state power.

Bio: Tim Winter is a Professor of Critical Heritage Studies and Australian Research Council Fellow at UWA. He is the former President of the Association of Critical Heritage STudies and has conducted research across a number of countries, primarily in Asia. Interdisciplinary in nature, his work addresses how the past comes to be mobilised in the present for political and economic purposes.

Friday 16
11:00 - SEMINAR - Construction and Infrastructure in the Philippines at the Turn of the Sixteenth Century More Information
Infrastructure and construction are the two physical aspects of village life discussed in this seminar. Roads and trails, where they existed, were located near or within towns since the lack of wheeled vehicles and the availability of waterways for easy travel by boat made these unsuited and undesirable for long distance travel. For towns to be viable, they needed supplies of fresh water for drinking and clean water for cooking. A location near natural springs or shallow sources of water for access by wells was essential. Construction required both wood and tools and those with the expertise to use them. The wood of magnificent trees supplied the material for posts and beams, and the grasses, palms and bamboo the material for cladding. Temporary structures were built in the fields or in the forest to provide shelter, and in the trees for defense, but it was the house which provided a permanent home. Discussed are the parts of the house and its construction from planning and measurement to completion. Emphasis will also be on the sources which provided the needed information, and on an explanation of the linguistic changes needed to relate terms across languages.

13:00 - PERFORMANCE - UWA Music presents: Lunchtime Concert | UWA Guitar Studio Website | More Information
Be transported from the everyday by our free lunchtime concert series, featuring the best musical talent from with the UWA Conservatorium of Music and around the country.

This week the UWA Guitar Studio will present a free concert of solo and chamber repertoire, featuring some very special works including Bill Kannengieser’s rarely performed 'Gongan' for prepared guitar quartet.

UWA's guitar students take the stage this week to present a beautiful program of solo and chamber works for the guitar.

Free entry, no bookings required.

13:00 - EVENT - Activist Writing: Balancing Risk and Safety : What risks do academics, activists and artists take in their work? NTEU Bluestocking Week panel discussion More Information
Bluestocking Week (12 - 16 August) is an initiative recognising women in the workplace. The UWA NTEU Branch will host a panel discussion on the risks academics, activists and artists take with their writing.

Panelists:

Zainab Syed (poet, producer, educator)

Dr Liana Joy Christensen (writer, editor, academic)

Dr Sally Knowles (activist, artist, academic)

with a message from Renée Pettitt-Schipp, winner of the WA Premier's Book Award for an Emerging Writer.

Facilitator: Dr Sanna Peden (NTEU UWA Branch President)

16:30 - COURSE - UWA Music presents: Accelerate! Guitars More Information
Accelerate is UWA's elite performance-training program for students in Years 10 to 12 who are looking to take their playing to the next level. Students will participate in weekly workshops, masterclasses and rehearsals culminating in a performance on 12 September.

The program runs on Friday afternoons 4.30 to 6.30 from August 16.

Further information at music.uwa.edu.au

17:00 - Masterclass - UWA Music presents: Open Percussion Masterclass by Emmanuel Séjourné More Information
French musician Emmanuel Séjourné is one of the world’s most influential percussion performers, composers and pedagogues. Head of Percussion at the Strasbourg Academy of Music/ Conservatory, he has delivered masterclasses on six continents, specialising in mallet instrument technique.

Percussionists and percussion teachers are invited to join Séjourné for an illuminating masterclass on mallet instrument pedagogy, pedalling techniques on vibraphone and sight-reading on mallet instruments.

Free entry - bookings essential

trybooking.com/BATEA
Sunday 18
15:00 - PERFORMANCE - UWA Music presents: Centre Stage | Emmanuel Séjourné and Sylvie Reynaert with Piñata Percussion More Information
Celebrated French virtuosi Emmanuel Séjourné and Sylive Reynaert (Strasbourg Conservatoire) perform with Piñata Percussion. The program will feature Séjourné's popular compositions for marimba and vibraphone alongside exciting international repertoire.

Tickets from $10

trybooking.com/BASXD
Tuesday 20
12:50 - SEMINAR - Political Science and International Relations : PhD Seminar Series 2019 More Information
Presentation 1: Title: Assembling, Deploying, and Contesting Social Impact Bonds in Australia

Speaker: Jacob Broom

Research Proposal Presentation)

Presentation 2: Title: The Political Economy of Post-Crisis Financial Stability Governance: A case study of macroprudential framework implementation in Australia

Speaker: Peter Thomsett

(Chapter Presentation)

18:00 - PUBLIC LECTURE - Launch of Big Issues for Western Australia Website | More Information
Launch of the UWA Public Policy Institute's new publication - Big Issues for Western Australia

The UWA Public Policy Institute is pleased to announce the launch of a major new publication, Big Issues for Western Australia.

We have gathered the opinions and practical suggestions of key WA figures across a wide range of issues, which have all been collated into a new publication to be officially launched on Tuesday 20 August 2019.

Big Issues for Western Australia gets opinion formers to look at concerns that are vital for the future success of the state’s economy, communities, public services and social cohesion. Contributors are focused on old and new problems, fresh ideas and approaches, and crucially, the use of evidence and expertise to set policy choices, drawing on examples of what works elsewhere that can have traction in WA.

Join us at this launch where you will have the opportunity to hear from a panel of our contributors and the UWA Public Policy Institute’s work to support evidence-based public policy in WA.

Copies of the publication will be available at the event.

Panel members:

* Ms Amanda Hunt (CEO, Uniting Care West)

* Ms Rabia Siddique (international humanitarian lawyer, keynote speaker, author)

* The Honourable Professor Stephen Smith (Chair of UWA Public Policy Institute Advisory Board)

* The Honourable Simone McGurk MLA (Minister for Child Protection; Women's Interests; Prevention of Family and Domestic Violence; Community Services)

19:30 - PERFORMANCE - UWA Music presents: Centre Stage | The Irwin Street Collective with Miriam Allan More Information
Soprano Miriam Allan's "sublime singing" (Gramophone, 2017) has been enjoyed around the world. As UWA Institute of Advance Studies Visiting Fellow she joins Sara Macliver, Cecilia Sun and Shaun Lee-Chen for a special free concert.

Free entry, bookings essential.

trybooking.com/BASXE
Thursday 22
15:00 - SEMINAR - CMSS Seminar : Family Violence and Your Visa More Information
Family violence and violence against women remain a major issue globally and in Australia. This affects migrant communities, including Muslim families, in Australia. In this presentation, Rachel Mathewson will outline the Home Affairs provisions and support provided for visa-holders affected by family violence. The information is practical and explains when and how people contact the Department and the types of information required.

Rachel Mathewson is the Assistant Director of the WA Community Engagement team with the Department of Home Affairs. She has worked in the Department since 2007 in a variety of roles from Learning and Development, Student Visas and Refugee and Humanitarian.

ENTRY: Free, but please RSVP to cmss-ss@uwa.edu.au

16:00 - SEMINAR - Past sea-level changes, environments and coastal demography. Is archaeology missing some critical factors? And if so, why? More Information
Abstract: This talk has three main sections: 1. An outline of the main sedimentary processes controlling coastal and marine archaeological sites, with a focus on Australia's NW shelf. This is relevant because it is a critical control upon much archaeological work in NW Australia, but it is poorly dealt with or, at worst, ignored. 2. A critique of the ongoing mis-use of radiocarbon dates as data in studies of past human demography. 3. An analysis of why these and other critical issues can become overlooked by some in archaeology, with a view of how it can be resolved to improve the quality of everyone's research.

Bio: In western Europe and Australia, Piers Larcombe has had 30 years of fun in sedimentary research, trying to understand how sedimentary systems work. His aim is that research and applied studies should use more information about the relevant physical systems.

18:00 - PUBLIC TALK - Women, Inequality and the Butterfly Effect : The 2019 Grace Vaughan Memorial Lecture by Antoinette Kennedy AO Website | More Information
The “butterfly effect” was coined in 1972 by Edward Lorenz in a talk titled “does the flap of a butterfly’s wings in Brazil set off a tornado in Texas?” It models how a small action can have a significant impact.

In this year’s Grace Vaughan Memorial Lecture, the Honourable Antoinette Kennedy AO, Western Australia’s first and longest serving female judge, will speak about the history of women in the law and her own history and what that has taught her about the many issues faced by women. The progressive act of taking opportunity and then using that position to speak truth for those that are voiceless is a feature of Antoinette’s life, and the essence of this year’s Grace Vaughan Memorial Lecture. Throughout her career, Antoinette’s primary interest was not what Governments could do for women - though she regards this as important - but what women could do for each other if they were properly informed and had the will. In particular, Antoinette is interested to explore what can be achieved when women support each other, have their consciousness raised, the freedom to look at issues outside of the male gaze and each woman has a power base consisting of every other woman.

Her talk will explore this concept as it applies to issues that particularly concern women and girls, in particular, family violence, the victimisation of girls through paedophilia, and how ignorance of this has left parents and the community undereducated and less able to protect girls. Finally, Antoinette will discuss the #Metoo movement as the most recent iteration of the women’s equality movement.

The Honourable Antoinette Kennedy AO was the first and longest serving female judge in Western Australia, serving for 25 years, and despite her retirement, remains the longest serving judge in the state. She was the first woman appointed as Chief Judge of the District Court (the first female head of a jurisdiction in WA and only the third in Australia) in 2004. She was made an Officer of the Order of Australia (AO) and was inducted into the WA Women’s Hall of Fame in 2012.

The annual Grace Vaughan Memorial Lecture lecture commemorates the life and achievements of Grace Vaughan, a social worker, social activist and parliamentarian, who was dedicated to the improvement of life at all levels and had a deep commitment to Australia’s participation in the Asian region and to ensuring women’s full participation in society. The lecture is presented by the Australian Association of Social Workers, the Institute of Advanced Studies at The University of Western Australia and Department of Communities Western Australia.

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