UWA Logo What's On at UWA
   UWA HomeProspective Students  | Current Students  | Staff  | Alumni  | Visitors  | About  |     Search UWA    for      
 

What's On at UWA

* Login to add events... *
Today's date is Tuesday, February 25, 2020
Events for the public
 July 2019
Wednesday 03
0:00 - EVENT - UWA Music presents: Marimbafest Australia Festival and Competition Website | More Information
Proudly supported by UWA Music, Marimbafest is an exciting new four-day International Marimba festival and competition run by UWA Graduate Adam Tan. Marimbafest will feature more than 20 hours of masterclasses, mentored performance opportunities, concerts and a three-stage solo Marimba competition.

International and Australian Faculty members include Dr Lynn Vartan (USA), Dr Wei-Chen Lin (Taiwan/USA), Kana Omori (Japan), Robert Oetomo (Australia) and festival director Adam Tan (Australia).

There are 3 festival concerts open to the public (free entry - no bookings required) as well as a range of workshops and masterclasses (single entry passes $30).

The Marimbafest Shop will be open on all Marimbafest days (Thursday 4th July - Sunday 7th July). Retailers include Buffalo Marimba & Drums (Taiwan), Optimum Percussion (NSW), Just Percussion (QLD), Edition Svitzer (Denmark), Mode Marimba (USA), CORAY Percussion (Hong Kong).

Industry demos will also be presented in between sessions by Therese Ng (Marimbafest Australia), Wendy Cheng (Buffalo Marimba & Drums, Taiwan), John Glowka (Mode Marimba, USA) and Gip Chan (GipPercussion, Hong Kong).

Further information and session times available at: www.marimbafest.com

17:45 - Information session - MBA and Graduate Certificate Information Evening : Find out about UWA MBA and Graduate Certificate courses on offer. Website | More Information
Are you ready to transform your career?

Join us at the next MBA and Graduate Certificate information evening.

Discover your study options and entry pathways into the UWA MBA, plus find out about the program's networking opportunities, access to industry professionals, personalised career mentorship and international study tours.

Meet our MBA Director, Allan Trench, as well as students currently in the program, alumni who've completed their course, and your future lecturers in the UWA Business School, to gain an insight of what life as an MBA candidate is really like.

5:45pm: Registrations open; 6:00pm: Presentations by current students, alumni and MBA Directors; 7:00pm: Networking, drinks and opportunity for your questions to be answered.

Registrations essential online: https://study.uwa.edu.au/events/mba-information-evening-3-july
Tuesday 09
18:00 - PUBLIC TALK - Right to Food: A reflection of the United Nations Special Rapporteur on Right to Food Website | More Information
A public lecture by Professor Hilal Elver, Global Distinguished Fellow, Resnick Program for Food Law and Policy, UCLA Law School and UN Special Rapporteur on the right to food and 2019 UWA Institute of Advanced Studies Visiting Fellow.

71 years ago, the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) established the foundation for the right to food by declaring that

"everyone has the right to a standard of living adequate for the health and well-being of himself and his family."

Article 11 of the International Covenant of the Economic Social and Cultural Rights (ICESCR), ratified in 165 countries and going into force in 1966, then established binding obligations on States to respect, protect and fulfil the right to adequate food for all. In this talk, the UN Special Rapporteur on Right to Food, Hilal Elver, will emphasize the importance of a human rights based approach to food security, the elimination of hunger and malnutrition, and reflect on the current status of the right to food worldwide. She will then discuss political, environmental and economic challenges that block successful implementation of the right to food in this time of economic globalization and climate change. She will also reflect on her unique experiences during her tenure, and suggest policy options for a sustainable and equitable future for healthy people, as well as a healthy planet.

Since 2014, Professor Hilal Elver has served as the Special Rapporteur on the right to food, who is responsible for carrying out the right to food mandate as prescribed by the United Nations Human Rights Council. Professor Elver is moreover an international law professor and a Global Distinguished Fellow at the UCLA Law School Resnick Food Law and Policy Center; and a research professor at the UC Santa Barbara, where she has been Distinguished Visiting Professor since 2002. Previously she was the UNEP Chair on Environmental Diplomacy at the Mediterranean Academy of Diplomatic Studies in Malta; and taught at the University of Ankara, Faculty of Law.

19:30 - TALK - UWA Publishing : Friends of the Library Website | More Information
Members: Free, Guests: $5 donation

University press publishing is an unusual beast these days and very different to its twentieth century model. But universities have changed, too.

Book publishing on a broader scale is a complex business. At a time when library books, public and private, are relegated to landfill, and information once locked away is available to everyone in a matter of seconds, what is the future for books and reading?

I’ll discuss UWA Publishing as part of a discussion with people who revere books and knowledge so strongly they are prepared to come out on a winter’s night to a library to hear someone talk about books.

Terri-ann White has been Director of UWA Publishing since 2006. She started her working life after tertiary studies as a bookseller, opening a highly curated bookshop, The Arcane Bookshop, at age 23 in Perth. (No books on sport, self-help, and no travel guides, but plenty of poetry, literary fiction and feminist theory.) Terri-ann has worked around books and ideas ever since.

Special Collections – special viewing for members The UWA Publishing Collection held in Special Collections contains a copy of titles published, (editions, hardback and paperback) by the UWA Press now known as UWA Publishing. Special Collections will be open on Tuesday 9th July 6.30 pm – 7.15pm for members to view a selection of publications from the UWA Publishing Collection.

Future Events 13th August Prof Peter Veth, Director Oceans Institute will discuss “The Atlantis of the North: unique records from ‘drowned landscapes’ off Northern Australia”.

“Translating a classic French novel: the problems posed by Emile Zola’s The Dream” by Dr Paul Gibbard, Lecturer European Languages and Studies is the topic for the 10th September talk.

October 8th is a special event, the presentation of the Clérambault 1710 edition from David Tunley to the Special Collections, with a performance of the work by the Conservatorium of Music Irwin Street Collective. The venue will be the Eileen Joyce Studio Conservatorium of Music.

Our final speaker for the year is Jill Benn, University Librarian and her presentation is “Library Place for Learning Space: Reflections in the Changing Nature of the Academic Library”. The Friends of the Library Christmas Party will be held on the same night as the 12th November talk.

RSVP: Kathryn Maingard – kathryn.maingard@uwa.edu.au or 08 6488 2356 https://www.eventbrite.com.au/e/uwa-publishing-by-professor-terri-ann-white-tickets-63464122900

Wednesday 10
10:00 - WORKSHOP - UWA Music presents: Discover! Percussion Website | More Information
Led by one of Perth's premier young percussionists Jackson Vickery, Discover! Percussion helps budding musicians aged 8-12 years leap into the wonderful world of percussion! This session will allow students to explore a range of tuned and untuned percussion instruments and learn new and exciting beats and rhythms! This hands on session is suitable for complete beginners, as well as those who have some prior musical experience i.e. those who have completed UWA JMS Programs or who have started percussion through their School! Discover! Percusison is presented as part of WinterARTS 2019.

Date & Time

Wednesday 10 July 2019, 10.00am - 11.30am (Ages 8-10)

Wednesday 10 July 2019, 12.30pm - 2.00pm (Ages 11-12)

https://www.trybooking.com/499505

18:30 - PUBLIC LECTURE - Plastic Free July: thinking globally, acting locally : Free AMSA Conference Public Lecture Website | More Information
Ocean plastic pollution, waste and the recycling “crisis” are hot topics. Cleaning up plastic waste and improving recycling systems are important but “turning off the tap” to reduce the problem at the source is critical. Plastic Free July is a global movement sharing ideas and solutions to help millions of people to be part of the solution to plastic pollution – so we can have cleaner streets, oceans, and beautiful communities.

From a humble office initiative in Perth to one of the world’s most widespread environmental movements the Plastic Free July has inspired 120 million participants in 170 countries. Hear the story behind this award winning behaviour change campaign and learn how you can be part of the solution.

Sponsored by UWA Oceans Institute

19:30 - FREE LECTURE - UWA Music presents: Centre Stage | Winterreise - the Phenomenon : Lecture Recital Website | More Information
In this free lecture recital, UWA Chair of Vocal Studies Andrew Foote will discuss some background to the early voice recitals and para-musical elements of Schubert's mammoth work for solo voice and piano – Winterreise.

Free entry, bookings essential (trybooking.com/BAWFV)

You can also see the entire work presented in two halves – a reconstruction performance with fortepiano, and the more usual modern presentation with pianoforte (but with a twist) on Saturday 13 July. Tickets for the full performance are $35.
Thursday 11
18:00 - PUBLIC TALK - Current Global Crises: towards a more humane global governance Website | More Information
A public lecture by Professor Richard Falk, Professor Emeritus of International Law, Princeton University; Professor, Orfalea Center of Global and International Studies, University of California Santa Barbara; and previous-UN Special Rapporteur on human rights in the Occupied Palestinian Territories (2008-2014) and 2019 UWA Institute of Advanced Studies Visiting Fellow.

We live in a time of multiple crises of varying scope and magnitude. The most serious crises in the present world situation threaten catastrophes of global scope: climate change; biodiversity; nuclear weaponry; human migration. Other contemporary crises are normative and structural: deficiencies of global leadership, as well as the decline of the United Nations, international law, and human rights. Humanitarian crises are causing massive suffering in Yemen, Syria and Republic of the Congo, Gaza and Rakhine (Myanmar). These multiple crises have produced the first bio-ethical crisis in human history, threatening the survival of civilization and even the human species. To envision a hopeful future seems utopian at this point. Yet every one of us must work to develop ideas, initiatives, and visions that move toward humane forms of global governance.

The rise of ultra-nationalism, autocratic democracies, and denialism are formidable obstacles to the achievement of this project. Two goals can guide our feelings, thoughts, and undertakings: establishing mechanisms inside or outside the UN that are dedicated to upholding the human interest; and renewing democratic vitality through the emergence of engaged citizenship as enacted by citizen pilgrims. We are in a period of history where the incrementalism of governmental policymaking and international institutions will not be responsive to the gravity of the challenges. Only the transnational mobilization of people has any credible prospect of producing the kind of transformative politics that are necessary at this point in time.

Professor Falk is one of the world’s leading scholars in the fields of International Relations and International Law. He is the author/co-author of 74 books, and hundreds of journal articles. His wealth of experience in various roles for the United Nations and non-government organisations, includes being a UN Special Rapporteur on human rights in the Occupied Palestinian Territories (2008-2014), working on initiatives such as the Independent International Commission on Kosovo, and heading up a recent project on the crisis in the Gulf.

19:00 - PERFORMANCE - UWA Music presents: Emma McPhilemy and Friends Website | More Information
Emma McPhilemy (UK) is an international soloist and performer with a highly unique and versatile style to her playing. Direct from the Melbourne Saxophone Festival, Emma will perform a solo recital before being joined on stage by some of Perth's leading saxophonists including UWA Graduate and Junior Saxophone School (JSS) Director, Erin Royer, and pianist Jonathan Bradley

TICKETS: $10 Concessions | $15 Standard

About Emma

Emma McPhilemy is an international soloist and performer with a highly unique and versatile style to her playing. She is endorsed by “Vandoren UK” and “Selmer Paris”, and performs regularly throughout the UK, Europe and China as a soloist and as leader of ‘The Abelia Saxophone Quartet and Ensemble’. She recently graduated from The Royal Northern College of Music with a First Class Honours degree, under the tuition of Rob Buckland, Andy Scott and Carl Raven.

Recent highlights include performing the UK premiere of John Mackey’s Soprano Saxophone Concerto; making her debut performance as a soloist at Wigmore Hall; leading her saxophone quartet to tour internationally whilst also having a busy schedule in the UK; touring Europe, the UK and China as the Musical Director and saxophone soloist in Bill Whelan’s production of ‘Riverdance’; winning the ‘Star Award’ from the Countess of Munster Musical Trust. Emma has managed several collaborative projects, international tours and performances with other conservatoire students around the UK and to China, Switzerland, Portugal and Strasbourg. She has also worked regularly with Opera North, and has recently been awarded a place at The Royal Northern College of Music to complete the ‘International Artist Diploma’, starting in September this year. Excitingly, this includes a concerto appearance with the BBC Philharmonic Orchestra where she will be premiering a new work written by composer, Tom Harrold.

In July 2018, Emma travelled to Switzerland to perform solo recitals and collaborative performances with various ensembles. She also plans to record a CD of new commissions with her pianist Philip Sharp in 2019 andhas commissioned composer Tom Harrold, to write a concerto for soprano saxophone and orchestra which will be premiered in June 2019 with The BBC Philharmonic Orchestra.
Friday 12
8:00 - SYMPOSIUM - Pilbara Coastal and Marine Science Symposium (PCMSS) : A multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary day-long symposium on the Pilbara Coast and nearshore marine regions Website | More Information
The Pilbara Coast, between Exmouth Gulf and the DeGrey Delta, is the most arid coast in Australia, and one of only several arid coasts around the world but the most diverse arid coast globally. Bordering a mineral-rich geological province, the Pilbara Coast has non-renewable resources, and has been utilised for industry e.g., ports for export of iron ore and other minerals, extraction and liquefaction of natural gas, and solar salt production. Additionally, in this geologically and biologically diverse region, there is a rich Indigenous history, with archaeological heritage manifest as shell middens and as rock art. Facilitated by the Geological Society of Australia and partners, brings together, for discussion and exchange of information and ideas, people from different scientific disciplines, and walks of life, bridging the extremes of the utilisation of the coast – from industrialisation, geo and bio conservation, to cultural heritage. This symposium follows the AMSA Conference, both being held in Fremantle. Registration for PCMSS can be made online https://forms.gle/rasELEKSEb2mAjRo6 or from the AMSA website http://amsa19.amsa.asn.au/ Abstracts (250 words) can be emailed to pcmss@iinet.net.au

11:00 - WORKSHOP - UWA Music presents: UWA Junior Saxophone School : Winter Bootcamp with guest international artist Emma Mcphilamy Website | More Information
An intensive two-day program designed to give saxophonists of all ages and abilities the opportunity to develop their musical skills!

Our winter bootcamp will give participants the opportunity to focus on ensemble playing, aural awareness, performance skills and general musicianship. In addition to input from some of the best saxophone tutors in Perth: Erin Royer, Jess Skye Herbert and Bridget Cleary we are very excited to welcome UK based saxophonist Emma McPhilemy to this bootcamp. Emma is a ‘Selmer Paris Artist’, ’Vandoren UK Artist', international soloist and performer with a highly unique and versatile style to her playing.

She performs regularly throughout the UK, Europe and China as a soloist and as leader of ‘The Abelia Saxophone Quartet and ensemble’.

She recently graduated from RNCM - Royal Northern College of Music with a First Class Honours degree, under the tuition of Rob Buckland, Andy Scott and Carl Raven. Cost: $100 for 2 days

We'll also be hosting a Masterclass Emma McPhilamy on Friday 12 July 2019 | 3pm https://www.trybooking.com/460507
Saturday 13
19:30 - PERFORMANCE - UWA Music presents: Centre Stage | Winterreise - the Phenomenon : Performance Website | More Information
Andrew Foote with Cecilia Sun and Mark Coughlan present Schubert's mammoth work for solo voice and piano - Winterreise.

Commencing with a lecture-recital (on Wednesday 10 July) discussing some background to the early voice recitals and para-musical elements of the work, the week concludes with the entire work presented in two halves – a reconstruction performance with fortepiano, and the more usual modern presentation with pianoforte (but with a twist).

Performance (13 July) $35

Lecture recital (10 July) Free

Bookings essential: trybooking.com/BAWFV
Monday 15
18:00 - PUBLIC LECTURE - Gendering Political Relationships in Genoese Ceremonial Entries : A public lecture by Elizabeth Reid (The University of Western Australia) Website | More Information
Gender is a valuable lens for interpreting the hierarchies at play in political performances and entry iconography. Throughout the preparation, enactment, and chronicling of ceremonial entries during the Italian Wars (1494–1559), cities and their entrants utilised gendered performance and allegory to articulate and negotiate their political relationships. The northern coastal republic of Genoa was a pivotal ally, first for Valois, and then for Hapsburg rulers, and in this capacity was the stage for both triumphant entries and entries-in-arms. Viewed collectively, the respective entries of King Louis XII of France, Holy Roman Emperor Charles V, and his son Prince Philip of Spain, demonstrate the entered city’s subjection to foreign interpretation as well as its flexibility of self-representation. Political interpreters, be they organisers tasked with staging an entry or poets tasked with shaping its cultural memory, drew upon familiar gendered scenarios to place the city in relation to the entrant. In this talk I will suggest that Genoa’s allegorical identity shifted from that of a dependent mistress, to a ruined woman under the French Valois; and then to a supportive brother, and ‘uncle’ under the Austro-Spanish Habsburgs.

This public lecture is organised by the Perth Medieval and Renaissance Group (PMRG) and the Centre for Medieval and Early Modern Studies (CMEMS) at The University of Western Australia and sponsored by the ARC Centre of Excellence for the History of Emotions.
Thursday 18
18:00 - FREE LECTURE - Sea Change: Global tracking of marine megafauna under anthrogenic footprint Website | More Information
Join us for this talk in the Anthropocene Sea Change Seminar Series at the UWA Oceans Institute with Ana Martins Sequeira.

Human impacts (e.g. overharvesting, by-catch mortality, pollution, acoustic and habitat degradation) have led to declines in abundance of many marine megafauna. Many species are threatened and with a bleak outlook for recovery due to little or no management in some cases, and a lack of international agreements on conservation of high seas biodiversity. Tracking data have led to evidence-based conservation of marine megafauna, but a disconnect remains between the many tens of 1000s of individual animals that have been tracked and the data used in conservation and management actions. I will discuss how, through the Marine Megafauna Movement Analytical Program (mmmp.wordpress.com) I am currently leading, we see that a global approach combining tracked movements of marine megafauna and human activities at-sea, and using existing and emerging technologies (e.g., artificial intelligence and big data approaches) can be applied to deliver near-real time diagnostics on existing risks and threats to mitigate global risks for marine megafauna. With technology developments over the next decade expected to catalyse the potential to survey marine animals and human activities in ever more detail and at global scales, the development of dynamic predictive tools based on near-real time tracking and environmental data will become crucial to address increasing risks.

Ana is a Marine Ecologist interested on the development of models to assist our understanding of the marine environment. Currently, her main focus is on understanding movement patterns of highly migratory marine megafauna, such as sharks, seals and whales, and on how they will fare with increasing anthropogenic pressures. To achieve this, Ana is leading the Marine Megafauna Movement Analytical Program (MMMAP; mmmap.wordpress.com), which aims to significantly improve our understanding of marine megafauna movement at a global scale to ultimately assist the conservation and management of economically important, charismatic and threatened highly migratory marine species. Ana is a DECRA Research Fellow at the University of Western Australia, funded by the Australian Research Council and supported by the Australian Institute of Marine Science.
Tuesday 23
11:00 - SEMINAR - UWA Centre for Muslim States and Societies (CMSS) Seminar : 'The Rise of Islamism in the Maldives' More Information
This presentation examines the spectacular emergence of Islamism in the twenty-first century in the island nation of the Maldives, where Islam has existed for about 800 years. It problematizes the conventional view that political Islam is the other of the modern state or an outcome of an aberrant understanding of Islam. As counterintuitive as it is, the chapter argues that the genealogy of Islamism goes back to the institutional and discursive politicisation of Islam through modern nation building since 1930s by state actors with Islamic modernist orientations. Those nation building projects transformed Islam into a modern religion in two primary ways. First, instead of jettisoning Islam from the polity, Islam was institutionalised into modern institutional forms – constitutions, codified laws and rules, centralised state authority, a bureaucratised judicial system. Second, Islam was also transformed into an extra-institutional public political discourse of collective national identity. Both forms of statist political Islam in many ways conformed to the liberal expectations and sensibilities consistent with Islamic modernist orientations. However, instead of weakening Islam in the polity, it was deeply embedded in the political domain. The paper shows that Islamism in the twenty-first century was unwittinglynourished by those forms of political Islam in the polity, as Islamism finds the right ‘language’ already in the political domain. While Islamism agrees with the modalities of the forms of political Islam that emerged through modern nation building, it deeply contests the content, as it were, of them. Oppositional Islamism wants more substantive institutionalisation of Islam and more substantive religious identity for the people, threatening even the liberal aspects of statist political Islam.

18:00 - PUBLIC TALK - Pulling Back the Big Blue Curtain: big fish and big parks Website | More Information
A public lecture by Jessica Meeuwig, Professor of Marine Science, The University of Western Australia and 2019 Australian Academy of Technology and Engineering Eminent Speaker.

Oceans are fundamental to life on planet “earth”. Over 72% of the planet’s surface is water; every 2nd breath we take is oxygen produced by the sea; and our food security depends on protein caught from the ocean. Yet humans are rapidly transforming our oceans and not in a good way. Globally, we are literally emptying the oceans of fish. Only 5% of hammerhead and thresher sharks remain relative to their numbers in 1950. Tunas are down to approximately 40% of historical numbers, and in the case of southern bluefin tuna, 95% are gone. In Australia, some estimates suggest that over 30% of large fish have been fished out, with large tiger, white and hammerheads declining by up to 92% in Queensland. In Western Australia, key species such as western rock lobster, dhufish and herring became so depleted that catch was cut in half to allow stocks to rebuild.

In the face of these challenges, marine parks, areas where marine life is protected from fishing, have been strongly advocated for by the science community as research shows that the coastal fish diversity, abundance and size increases in these protected areas. Australia has now established large marine parks in our offshore “big blue” waters and the question is: how does ocean wildlife respond to protection. We explore this question by deploying non-destructive baited video cameras in offshore waters to identify, count and measure ocean wildlife. This is a window onto our new marine parks.

This lecture is presented by the UWA Institute of Advanced Studies and the Australian Academy of Technology and Engineering.
Wednesday 24
18:00 - FREE LECTURE - Finding Rembrandt in Love and Life : A public lecture by Professor Susan Broomhall (The University of Western Australia) Website | More Information
This lecture explores how the character of Rembrandt van Rijn is interpreted through place, gender and emotions in museums and heritage sites in the Netherlands today. It focuses on the cities of Leiden and Amsterdam, Rembrandt’s homes, and particularly, the role of women in shaping interpretations of Rembrandt’s life and work. Historical women in Rembrandt’s life are increasingly employed as tools to understand the artist’s mind in creative responses such as Peter Greenaway’s 2006 film Nightwatching or the 2009 Australian opera by Andrew Ford and Sue Smith, Rembrandt’s Wife. This lecture investigates how heritage sites have likewise co-opted Rembrandt’s relationships with women, in a range of ways, in order to increase visitor engagement.

This public lecture is part of the 'Rembrandt – 350th Anniversary Lecture Series' presented by the Institute of Advanced Studies at The University of Western Australia and sponsored by the ARC Centre of Excellence for the History of Emotions.

18:00 - PUBLIC TALK - Finding Rembrandt in Love and Life Website | More Information
A public lecture by Dr Susan Broomhall, School of Humanities (History), UWA.

This lecture explores how the character of Rembrandt van Rijn is interpreted through place, gender and emotions in museums and heritage sites in the Netherlands today. It focuses on the cities of Leiden and Amsterdam, Rembrandt’s homes, and particularly, the role of women in shaping interpretations of Rembrandt’s life and work. Historical women in Rembrandt's life are increasingly employed as tools to understand the artist's mind in creative responses such as Peter Greenaway's 2006 film 'Nightwatching' or the 2009 Australian opera by Andrew Ford and Sue Smith, 'Rembrandt's Wife'. This lecture investigates how heritage sites have likewise co-opted Rembrandt's relationships with women, in a range of ways, in order to increase visitor engagement.

Rembrandt’s death took place 350 years ago this year, in 1669. Museums across the globe, from Amsterdam to the Arabian Gulf, are staging exhibitions to commemorate his artistic legacy, and a life that was far from a masterpiece. Sometimes dismissed contemptuously in his own time, the supreme genius of Rembrandt is now universally acknowledged. The Institute of Advanced Studies at The University of Western Australia is pleased to present a series of lectures offering insights into the artist’s life, his work and its reception.
Thursday 25
13:30 - FORUM - The UWA Institute of Agriculture Industry Forum : Finding Common Ground: Bringing food, fibre and ethics to the same table Website | More Information
With increasing public scrutiny of agricultural practices in food and fibre production, rebuilding trust between innovative primary producers and ethically informed consumers is becoming more important than ever before. Join us for a lively discussion on finding common ground and moving forward together.

The event program is as follows: 1.30pm Registration and refreshments, 2.00pm Event start, 5.00pm - 6.30pm Sundowner

For more details, view the flyer: http://www.ioa.uwa.edu.au/publications/industry-forum
Friday 26
14:30 - SEMINAR - Anthropology & Sociology Seminar Series : The Thermal Complex: Air conditioning Urban Asia in an era of Climate Change More Information
As cities across the world endure increase extremes of heat, indoor comfort has become a key vector in the debate about sustainability and energy consumption. Across Asia the carbon footprint of buildings continues to rise because of the widespread adoption of air conditioning. Current trends are unsustainable, and alternative, less energy intensive comfort regimes need to be maintained or cultivated.

This presentation examines such challenges as a thermal complex, an approach that seeks to move the debate beyond questions of engineering and smart-city solutions. In this informal presentation we want to outline our struggle at conceptualising a book, and the challenges of imparting socio-cultural histories and political analyses into a domain dominated by techno-scientific discourses.

Jiat Hwee Chang is Associate Professor at the School of Design and Environment, National University of Singapore, and is author of a number of books, including A Genealogy of Tropical Architecture: Colonial Networks, Nature and Technoscience. He is also co-founder of Southeast Asia Architecture Research Collaborative (SEAARC).

Tim Winter is ARC Professorial Future Fellow in the School of Sciences, UWA and was Lead CI on 2 international research collaborations on air conditioning and urban development in Southeast Asia (ARC DP) and the Middle East (QNRF).

Alternative formats: Default | XML


Top of Page
© 2001-2010  The University of Western Australia
Questions? Mail weboffice@uwa.edu.au