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Today's date is Friday, October 19, 2018
Events for the public
 August 2018
Wednesday 15
18:00 - EVENT - Going International: The International Student on Campus : Panel presentation covering the international student experience from the 60's & 80's and today Website | More Information
This panel presentation provides insight into the experiences of 3 UWA overseas students. The first panelist was a Colombo Plan student from Malaysia in the 1960s. The second was from Romania and studied at UWA in the 1980s. The third panelist is a New Columbo Plan Scholar and has recently returned from China.
Thursday 16
16:00 - SEMINAR - Archaeology Seminar : Collecting the West: The Captain Matthew McVicker-Smyth Collection More Information
‘Collecting the West’ is an ARC funded research project that looks at what’s been collected from Western Australia with a particular focus on collecting practices. This focus enables exploration of the role of collections in identity formation, place making and the production of knowledge. The project’s time span, which reaches as far back as the 1600s and as recently as the present, also locates these collecting practices with the contexts of imperialism, colonialism and the development of State based identities as well as across disciplinary divides. In this paper, we will talk about the discovery of five photographs in 2018 in the State Library of Western Australia which led to the discovery of a forgotten private museum housing the collection of Captain Matthew McVicker-Smyth in early 20th century Perth. Captain Smyth was responsible for the selling of Nobel explosives used by agriculture and the mining industry. The museum contained mineral specimens in cases alongside extensive, aesthetically organised displays of Australian Aboriginal artifacts, amidst a wide variety of ornaments and decorative paintings. The museum reflects a moment in the history of colonialism that reminds us today of forms of dispossession, of how Aboriginal people were categorised in Australia by Western worldviews, and the ways that collectors operated. The research brings back into existence a significant Western Australian museum and opens up a new discussion of how such private collections came into existence and what their legacy might be today.

18:00 - PUBLIC TALK - Water for Chocolate - becoming a food and water literate consumer Website | More Information
An 'All at Sea' public lecture by Professor Anas Ghadouani, Head, Aquatic Ecology and Ecosystems Studies and Programme Chair, Environmental Engineering, The University of Western Australia.

Do you think you’re water literate? More than 80% of Australians know little about the most important thing keeping them alive. Where do you think you use the most water? Washing? Flushing? Watering the garden? Wrong – and Professor Anas Ghadouani, a passionate and self-confessed water geek, has some surprising news for you. But if you love chocolate he has some not-so-great news too… Anas is passionate about all aspects of water engineering and management. With more than 20 years of experience, which took has taken him all over the world while researching water in a wide and diverse range of environments, Anas has developed a unique, integrated and solution-focused approach for the study of water issues. In this public lecture Anas will discuss ways to reduce your water footprint and close the loop on the water cycle at a local level.

All at Sea: Restoration and Recovery Series- Our oceans and coasts provide us with food, energy, livelihoods, cultural and recreational opportunities, yet they are coming under increasing pressure.

This UWA Institute of Advanced Studies - UWA Oceans Institute Lecture Series explores the wonders of our seas, the challenges they face and how research at UWA- in a diverse range of fields including marine science, ocean engineering, health, humanities and social sciences- are contributing to ensure sustainability.

18:00 - EVENT - The ‘Civitas Pia’ of Pope Pius IV (1561-1565) Website | More Information
Permittitur tamen - It’s Ok to Grow Artichokes There. The ‘Civitas Pia’ of Pope Pius IV (1561-1565)

A public lecture by Roger Vella Bonavita, Honorary Senior Research Fellow, The University of Western Australia

The Medici Pope Pius IV (1559-1565) built the suburb now called Borgo Pio (originally named Civitas Pia) and the third enceinte of Castel S. Angelo, also completing the enceinte around the Vatican (unfinished since 1532). He also planned to replace Aurelian’s ancient walls (18 kilometres long) around Rome with gunpowder fortifications.

Capitano Francesco Laparelli da Cortona, a brilliant but obscure Tuscan engineer, was put in charge of these projects by his patron and friend Gabrio Serbelloni; a nephew of Pius IV, governor of Rome, and superintendent of the fortifications in the papal states who was himself a distinguished soldier and military engineer. The role of the pope himself, even in technical discussions, is important too. These projects must be seen in the context of the crying need for up to date defences to enable the papacy to maintain its independence against pressures from Spain (and France).

This illustrated public lecture will highlight the fascinating story of the preparation of the new urban area: which involved levelling the site, demolishing the ninth century church of S. Maria Traspontina and its adjacent Carmelite monastery besides laying out the streets, sewers, water supply and civic buildings and finally the building regulations promulgated by Pius IV for his Civitas Pia in the Bull Romanorum decet Pontificem (August 1565), which for very good reasons specifically permitted the cultivation of artichokes outside the walls of the new city.

Pius sent Laparelli to Malta in November 1565 to assist the Order of St John after it survived a four month siege by the Ottoman Turks. There he designed and built a new fortified capital called Valletta.

19:00 - PERFORMANCE - UWA Music presents: Keyed Up! Alex Raineri Website | More Information
“As a voyager of the keys, Raineri is courageous. He doesn’t shy away from risk in his drive towards dramatic moments.” Limelight Magazine, 2018

Pianist Alex Raineri is a sought-after recitalist, concerto soloist and chamber musician. He joins us at UWA as a Royal Over-Seas League Artist in Residence for a week of workshops, masterclasses and performances.

In this his solo recital, he presents a program of challenging and varied works for piano including a new work by UWA faculty member James Ledger.

Program

Johann Sebastian Bach / Sergei Rachmaninoff - Prelude in E from Violin | Partita #3, BWV 1006 | Chris Dench - flex for AR (2017) | Ludwig van Beethoven - Sonata No. 8 in C minor, Op. 13 ‘Pathetique’ | Maurice Ravel - Pavane Pour Une Infante Defunte | James Ledger - Intended Inventions (2017)

Tickets: Standard $25 | Concessions $20 | Friends of UWA Music $18 | School students attend for FREE (email concerts@uwa.edu.au)
Friday 17
11:00 - SEMINAR - Asian Studies Seminar : Kishi Nobusuke, Moral Re-armament, and Asian Regionalism, 1945-1962 More Information
The origins of political conservatism in Japan are mired in Occupation history, with scholars emphasizing its emergence as a postwar development determined by the alliance between Washington and Japanese elites. This paper re-examines Japanese conservatism as a transwar and transnational project. It focuses on the involvement of Prime Minister Kishi Nobusuke (1896-1987) in the Moral Re- Armament movement (MRA), an international religious organization that caught the attention of politicians, industrialists, and union leaders around the world in the 1940s and 1950s. It shows that MRA helped Japanese elites such as Kishi to reformulate prewar notions of Asian regionalism into Cold War internationalism— what I call the conservative imaginary. In so doing, the paper sheds new light on the negotiated transition from prewar fascism and imperialism to postwar democracy, and helps to explain the political culture of important sections of the Japanese ruling classes up to the present.

11:00 - SEMINAR - Linguistics Seminar : Working with communities on language revitalisation: Some Australian experiences More Information
In this seminar I will discuss issues and challenges around the concepts of language reclamation and language revitalization, especially their relationship to language documentation and description. Discussion will draw on current work with the Dieri Aboriginal Corporation (South Australia) and Yinggarda and Bayungu communities in Carnarvon (Western Australia).

13:00 - PERFORMANCE - UWA Music presents: Free Lunchtime Concert: Alex Raineri & UWA Woodwinds More Information
Be transported from the everyday by our free lunchtime concert series, featuring the best musical talent from within the UWA Conservatorium of Music and around the country.

This week we welcome pianist Alex Raineri, a sought-after recitalist, concerto soloist and chamber musician. He joins us at UWA as Royal Over-Sea League Visiting Artist and has spent the week working closely with UWA Wind Students culminating in this free lunchtime perfromance.

Entry is free - no bookings required

14:30 - SEMINAR - Anthropology and Sociology Seminar : Extraplanetary Effect : Humans, Technologies and Environments beyond Earth More Information
The momentum of technological progress has been steadily reaching outside the planet. Grounded in media infrastructure and practices, our conquest of outer space has been absorbing its inhuman expanses into human mores, entangling them into the circuits of capital, knowledge, ideas and affects and rendering them into a site in which our ‘earthly’ processes of production and consumption, extraction and destruction can propagate and multiply. This paper explores the ways in which the presence and operations of media apparatus beyond the globe forge new relationships between humans, technologies and their environments, reconfiguring the material and social ambits of the arena of life. I consider some of the key trajectories of these ‘extraplanetary’ effects, suggesting that their inflection upon the human media condition tempers the unfolding of our world-making affinities on and off the earth.

15:00 - EVENT - Save the Children UWA Book Sale : Join us in Winthrop Hall for the University Branch 2018 Book Sale, raising money for Save the Children. Website | More Information
A huge number of quality donated books in popular and specialist categories; plus CDs, DVDs, LPs and sheet music all at bargain prices!

Friday 17 August 3-9pm / Saturday 18 August 8-5pm / Sunday 19 August 9-6pm / Monday 20 August 9-6pm / Tuesday 21 August 9-7pm / Wednesday 22 August 9-3pm
Saturday 18
17:00 - PERFORMANCE - UWA Music presents: The Irwin Street Collective | Brandenburg 5 More Information
BPhil (Hons) student Jonty Coy (Baroque flute) joins Conservatorium staff Shaun Lee-Chen (violin) and Cecilia Sun (harpsichord), plus friends, to present an all Bach program including his Sonata in E minor for Flute and Continuo, Chaconne from Partita No. 2 for Violin, and Brandenburg Concerto No. 5 in D Major.

Entry is free but bookings are essential - RSVP to concerts@uwa.edu.au
Tuesday 21
13:00 - FREE LECTURE - FREE Gamsat Essay Writing Workshop : This workshop will help you get a head start on acing Section 2 of the GAMSAT® Exam Website | More Information
This workshop will help you get a head start on acing Section 2 of the GAMSAT® Exam. Essay writing skills generally take time to develop, which means starting your preparation early is key to success. The workshop facilitator, Robert Callan, has had extensive experience in teaching GAMSAT® Exam essay writing.

Robert will teach you how to “find the theme”, which will allow you to respond to the stimuli effectively. To combat the immense time pressure of the GAMSAT® Exam, you will also be taught how to plan an essay structure in a short time-frame. Robert will then cover the 4 steps to writing a good essay. To cap it off, you will be shown a few tips on how to utilize your existing knowledge to generate engaging and targeted essay content.

Be sure to save your spot through our EventBrite page:

https://www.eventbrite.com.au/e/free-gamsat-essay-writing-workshop-uwa-gradready-tickets-48945705924
Wednesday 22
18:00 - PUBLIC LECTURE - Sir Wallace Kyle Oration 2018 Website | More Information
The McCusker Centre for Citizenship at UWA, in partnership with the Rotary Club of Perth, invite you to the 2018 Sir Wallace Kyle Oration.

The late Air Chief Marshall, Sir Wallace Kyle, was an Honorary Doctor of Laws at The University of Western Australia and Governor of Western Australia from 1975-1980.

The Sir Wallace Kyle Oration is given by distinguished speakers of international standing and outstanding leadership. The theme of the Oration is "Service Above Self", the motto of Rotary.

Professor Stanley's oration will highlight the leadership and contribution individual citizens can make to build a more equal and just world, with reference to her distinguished career.

This is a free public event but registration is required.

18:00 - PUBLIC TALK - How to Make a Revolutionary Object: the drawings of Gustavs Klucis Website | More Information
A public lecture by Professor Maria Gough, Joseph Pulitzer, Jr. Professor of Modern Art, Harvard University.

This talk focuses on a corpus of presentation drawings for new media-driven structures for the revolutionary street: radio-orators, projection screens, advertising stands, slogan signs, and newspaper kiosks. Executed in the early 1920s by Gustavs Klucis (Gustav Klutsis), a Latvian immigrant to Moscow who would later enjoy renown as the leading Soviet photomonteur of the interwar period, these striking drawings have long captivated artists, architects, and designers due to their optical dynamism and graphic presence, explicit intertwining of radical aesthetics and agitational politics, and perspicacious concatenation of media and small-form architecture for revolutionary purposes.

Professor Gough is in Australia as a Visiting Professor at Edith Cowan University and this guest lecture is sponsored by the Edith Cowan Centre for Global Issues.
Thursday 23
12:00 - EVENT - Archaeology Honours Info Session : Experimenting with Archaeology More Information
Archaeology Honours Info Session

Thursday 23rd August 12-1 pm Social Sciences 1.93 (the ‘FishBowl’) All welcome! Brownies and muffins will be served!

Come hear from Staff, current and past Honours students about exciting research projects, skills training, career pathways, practical info, funding and prizes. Contact: sven.0uzman@uwa.edu.au : http://handbooks.uwa.edu.au/undergraduate/honoursdetails?vdir=bh001_arcgy


14:00 - SEMINAR - Archaeology Seminar : Aerial Archaeology in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia More Information
Abstract n July 2017, King Salman bin Abdulaziz of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia established the Royal Commission for Al-Ula, a broad ranging directive designed to help develop the region around the desert oasis Al-Ula and to document and preserve its rich archaeology. One aspect of this commission is the ‘Identification and Documentation of Immovable Heritage Assets (IDIHA)’: an international team of archaeologists that utilise ground survey, remote sensing and aerial archaeology to record the archaeological sites surrounding the oasis of Al-Ula and its hinterland. Under the directorship of Professor David Kennedy, the University of Western Australia team utilises remote sensing data and helicopters to survey inaccessible archaeological sites in the desolate but dramatic landscapes surrounding the town. This survey will provide in many instances the first archaeological documentation of these sites. Furthermore, Structure from Motion techniques like photogrammetry, along with ad-hoc ground survey, have been performed to allow a more intensive analysis of the archaeology, with preliminary analysis of the ceramic and lithic data suggesting many may date to the Neolithic and Bronze Age. This seminar will focus on the methodology utilised by the team for the discovery, identification, and recording of these archaeological sites, the preliminary results of the first field season and a discussion of the future of the project.

18:00 - PUBLIC TALK - The Idea of Peace Parks in Africa Website | More Information
A public lecture by Professor Maano Ramutsindela, Department of Environmental and Geographical Science, University of Cape Town and 2018 UWA Institute of Advanced Studies Visiting Fellow.

Peace parks are not unique to Africa but have a salient character in the continent as a result of Africa’s socio-political, economic and environmental conditions. This talk will analyse how the idea of peace parks was developed, and how it took root on various sites in twenty-first century Africa. It will argue that the idea of peace parks gained legitimacy by assembling together environmental issues, archaeological findings, segments of colonial histories, post-independence development challenges, and local and global aspirations into a meta-discourse of peace and development. This discourse also chimed with pan-Africanism and decolonial thinking. The creation of peace parks in Africa raises questions about how African landscapes are re-imagined by various actors ranging from African governments, business, and donor agencies. Peace parks not only reignite historical images of Africa but also present a contested vision for the future of the continent and its people.
Friday 24
11:00 - SEMINAR - Public Seminar: Women’s representation in Asian parliaments More Information
Women’s representation in Asian parliaments

The presentation will examine the relationship between socioeconomic development, corruption, the level of democracy, and women’s parliamentary representation in contemporary Asia. Previous studies have argued that economic development offers women new opportunities and resources to participate in politics. Despite some notable gains in gender equality through this process, prosperous Asian nations continue to perform poorly compared to other world regions in terms of women’s parliamentary representation. The presentation will show that the level of women’s presence in legislatures throughout Asia is a result of multiple configurations of conditions beyond simply one or two explanations, including economic development or religion.

About the speaker:

Ella S Prihatini is a political science and international relations researcher at the University of Western Australia (UWA), Perth. She holds a BA in International Relations (University of Gadjah Mada/UGM, Yogyakarta) and Master of Development Practice (Adv) (University of Queensland/UQ, Brisbane).

Her research interests focus on women's political participation, gender studies of Asia, young voters, and electoral politics in Indonesia. Ella is affiliated with the UWA Centre for the Muslim States and Societies (CMSS). Her study at UWA is fully supported by the Endeavour Postgraduate Scholarship program (2015-2019).

13:00 - PERFORMANCE - UWA Music presents: Free Lunchtime Concert | UWA Guitar Studio More Information
Be transported from the everyday by our free lunchtime concert series, featuring the best musical talent from within the UWA Conservatorium of Music and around the country.

This week, let the sensuous sound of classical guitars take you from the mundane to the sublime as students from the UWA Guitar Studio perform solo, duo and ensemble works.

Entry is free - no bookings required

14:30 - CANCELLED - SEMINAR - Anthropology and Sociology Seminar : Refugees in Europe (and Australia): Encounters, Memories and Emotions More Information
Unfortunately this event has been cancelled.



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Respect for human dignity, freedom, democracy, equality, and the rule of law are inscribed in the Treaty on the European Union. The current refugee crisis touches upon these moral values on which the EU is founded. The boom of anti-immigrant social movements and the growth of xenophobic and Islamophobic rhetoric in the aftermath of the events of 2015-16 suggest that Europe might not fully live up to its founding principles. Confronted with the refugee crisis, most European countries are turning inwards, rejecting refugees, limiting new immigration, and revising their integration policies. This paper seeks to understand how experiences of past migrations transform values, attitudes and acceptance or rejection of refugees in Europe and Australia, and in turn the sense and patterns of solidarity. In the periods of 1956, 1980/1981 (‘Solidarity’ wave), and 1992-1994, Austria, Germany, and Sweden received large numbers of refugees from Poland, Hungary and former Yugoslavia within short periods of time. From 1947-54 Australia received 170, 000 displaced persons of diverse ethnic and cultural backgrounds, 60,000 of those were Polish. During the period 1980-91, approximately 25,000 Polish refugees arrived in Australia. Based on my quantitative (factorial survey and conjoint analysis) and qualitative (in-depth interviews and creative methods) research among Polish migrants in Germany and Australia, I investigate emotions and the meaning of personal memories of those people who sought refuge. Thereby, I draw on Assmann’s definition of personal memories as an essential to the production of collective memory, and thus to groups’ identities.

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