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Today's date is Friday, October 19, 2018
Events for the public
 August 2018
Tuesday 07
17:00 - FREE LECTURE - Free Presentation : Secretary of the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade, Ms Frances Adamson on The Indo-Pacific: A Western Australian Perspective Website | More Information
The Perth USAsia Centre is honoured to host Ms Frances Adamson, Secretary of the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade for a public presentation on ‘The Indo-Pacific: A WA Perspective'. The Indo-Pacific region is a central focus of the 2017 Foreign Policy White Paper. The White Paper recognised Australia’s shifting regional landscape, and identified the promotion of an open, inclusive and prosperous Indo-Pacific region as critical for both Australia’s and the region’s security and prosperity. Due to its unique position on the Indian Ocean, and as a commercial gateway for Australia to the region, Western Australia has a significant role to play in the Indo-Pacific. This event provides the opportunity to gain insight into the role of Western Australia can play in Australia’s foreign policy approach to the Indo-Pacific region. We look forward to welcoming you at this exclusive event.
Wednesday 08
18:00 - PUBLIC TALK - Three Kinds of Clay, Three Kinds of Antiquity? : The 2018 Tom Stannage Memorial Lecture Website | More Information
The 2018 Tom Stannage Memorial Lecture by Ann McGrath AM, the Kathleen Fitzpatrick ARC Laureate Fellow and Distinguished Professor, School of History, Australian National University

In this memorial lecture, Professor McGrath will focus upon the story of how ‘Terra Australis’ or ‘Sydneia’ - Linnaean classifications for Sydney’s ‘primitive earth’ – became an agent in the importation of Anglo-Hellenic antiquity. What might such clay stories, replete with alluring female figures, reveal about plans to transform a strange earth? How could a fantastically storied antiquity, with it super-corporeal characters, co-exist with the Enlightenment’s fascination with science? Do Indigenous songlines provides clues? And how might such questions relate to the more recent articulations of deep human pasts associated with ancient places like Lake Mungo and the many sites currently being researched in Western Australia?

The 2018 Tom Stannage Memorial Lecture - This memorial lecture commemorates the exceptional contribution made by Professor Tom Stannage (1944-2012) to the Western Australian community. Professor Stannage was a prominent Australian historian who worked hard to foster a wider understanding of Western Australian history and heritage. He is remembered as an inspiring teacher and a passionate advocate for the study of history.
Thursday 09
18:00 - TALK - Just Not Cricket. Aspects of the ball tampering saga Website | More Information
A panel discussion presented by the UWA School of Human Sciences (Exercise and Sport Science) and the UWA Institute of Advanced Studies.

Why Tamper? Understanding the aerodynamics of a cricket ball - Professor Andrew Cresswell, Head, School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences and Professor of Biomechanics/Neurophysiology at The University of Queensland and 2018 UWA Institute of Advanced Studies Visiting Fellow.

Professor Cresswell will present an overview of how a cricket ball behaves in flight. Particular focus will be on the material properties and characteristics of the ball. This will lead to a description of the aerodynamics of a stationary and rotating cricket ball. The aerodynamic effects of the ball’s surface properties and speed will be discussed.

The Law: caught and bowled - Dr Tony Buti, Member for Armadale, WA State Parliament and Honorary Fellow, Law School, The University of Western Australia.

In this talk Dr Buti will provide a commentary on the law of cricket and the process leading to the sanctions imposed on Steve Smith, David Warner and Cameron Bancroft, then move on to discussing issues of sporting contracts, sports tribunals and behavioural misconduct by athletes.

Caught out: a perspective on ethical behaviour in sport - Associate Professor Sandy Gordon, The University of Western Australia, Registered Sport Psychologist.

Dr Gordon will present a critical perspective on the topic, which explains behaviour in professional sport from a rarely considered ideological viewpoint, and comment on social psychological factors such as apparent misuse of power, group think and risky shift phenomena. Suggestions for sport organisations on value-proofing will be offered and also his personal opinion on the ‘character-building and sport’ relationship.

18:00 - PUBLIC TALK - Sleep, Body Clocks and Health: biology to new therapeutics Website | More Information
A public lecture by Russell Foster, Professor of Circadian Neuroscience, Senior Fellow Brasenose College, University of Oxford and 2018 UWA Institute of Advanced Studies Visiting Fellow.

Our internal 24 hour biological clock (circadian clock) and daily sleep processes interact to play an essential, yet poorly recognised, role in our lives. Sleep is not just the simple suspension of physical movement but is an active state when the brain coordinates indispensable activities that define our ability to function whilst awake. The quality of our sleep profoundly influences our cognition, levels of social interaction, empathy, alertness, mood, memory, physical strength, susceptibility to infection, and every other aspect of our waking biology. We are beginning to understand how these critical processes are generated and regulated and many surprising findings have surfaced. For example, until recently it seemed inconceivable to most vision researchers and ophthalmologists that there could be an unrecognised type of light sensor within the eye. Yet we now know that there exists a “3rd class” of photoreceptor in the eye that detects the dawn/dusk cycle and which sets the internal clock to the solar day. The past decade has witnessed remarkable progress in understanding how the brain generates and regulates our daily patterns of sleep and wake. In parallel with this understanding, there has been a growing realisation that our sleep and circadian rhythms cannot be ignored in our headlong dash to generate a 24/7 society. This presentation will review the biology of sleep and circadian rhythms, what happens when these systems go wrong and how recent discoveries are allowing new therapeutics to be developed that will help correct abnormal patterns of sleep and wake.
Friday 10
13:00 - PERFORMANCE - UWA Music presents: Free Lunchtime Concert | Suzanne Wijsman (cello) and Martina Liegat (piano) More Information
Be transported from the everyday by our free lunchtime concert series, featuring the best musical talent from within the UWA Conservatorium of Music and around the country.

This week, Head of Strings Suzanne Wijsman joins forces with Martina Liegat to perform some beautiful works for cello and piano including: Cui 'Deux Morceaux, No. 1', Dvorák 'Silent Woods', and Brahms 'Sonata in E minor'

Entry is free - no bookings required

15:00 - EVENT - MAN v FAT Soccer UWA: Registrations open : Love Soccer? Hate being overweight? You've come to the right place. Website | More Information
UWA Sport and the Psychology of Active, Healthy Living (PAHL) group at The University of Western Australia have partnered with a successful weight-loss program from the United Kingdom (UK) that is designed specifically for men.

MAN v FAT Soccer is for overweight and obese men of any fitness level - every player is in the same situation and wants the same thing. Players join a 6 a-side soccer team and play a match each week, but uniquely, their team's position in the league is decided not just by goals scored on the pitch, but also by weight lost each week.

Realising that most weight loss programs just weren't working for men, the UK founders of the program opened the first MAN v FAT league in January 2016. Just over two years later, there are now over 50 leagues and 4,500 men involved across the UK, and together they've managed to lose over 50,000kg!

If you're a man who has a BMI of 27.5 or higher then you're eligible to join the UWA MAN v FAT league; the first MAN v FAT league anywhere in the world outside the UK! Registration for the first UWA season is just $10; all other costs are being subsidised by UWA Sport.

Registration night: Wednesday 5 September, 6–8pm, UWA Watersports Complex

League dates: Wednesday 12 September–Wednesday 12 December (Wednesday nights, 6-9pm). Weekly competition includes 30-minute soccer match and weigh in before the match.

Location: Riley Oval, University of Western Australia

Registration cost: $10 (Subsidised league)

Registrations open/Registrations close: Monday 6 August/Friday 31 August

Twitter: @manvfatsoccerau Facebook: /manvfatsoccerau
Sunday 12
10:00 - OPEN DAY - UWA Open Day 2018 : Everything you need to know about university, all in one place. Website | More Information
UWA’s Open Day is the best way to get a feel for life at uni. Everything you could ever want to know is right there for you, from info about our unique course structure and career opportunities to details about student clubs and accommodation.

Our stunning campus will be buzzing with activities, displays, entertainment and more, and there’ll be staff and students on hand to answer your questions.

You can be a future student, a parent, a teacher…well, just about anyone. All you need is a sense of curiosity and excitement.

So drop by on Sunday 12 August – you never know what you might learn.

Find out more at uwa.edu.au/openday

#UWAOpenDay
Monday 13
18:00 - PUBLIC TALK - Black Bodies, White Gold: cotton, art and the materiality of race Website | More Information
A public lecture by Anna Arabindan-Kesson, Assistant Professor of Black Diasporic Art, Princeton University.

This talk examines the visual relationship between the cotton trade and the representation of blackness in American culture, using historical case studies and contemporary art. Juxtaposing contemporary interventions with historical moments, it examines how cotton materially influenced the way black Americans were seen, and represented themselves, as both enslaved and free. It argues that tracing this relationship deepens our understanding of the intersections of vision, value and subjectivity in the production of racial identity in nineteenth-century America, and also today.
Tuesday 14
13:00 - SEMINAR - Political Science and International Relations Seminar : Donald Trump and the ANZUS Alliance: Strategic culture and the politics of path dependence More Information
An enduring feature of Australia’s strategic policy is the alliance with the United States. Australian policymakers have made major material contributions in support of this relationship over the years, despite an absence of direct strategic threats and the fact that its economic relationship with China has become increasingly important. The paper analyses the context in which Australian strategic policy is embedded and the forces that inform policy choices. It is suggested that the institutionalization of Australia’s distinctive strategic culture imparts a degree of path dependency to strategic policy that makes significant change unlikely despite a rapidly evolving external environment, despite the fact that the impact of the Trump Administration’s policies has been broadly negative from Australia’s perspective.

19:00 - TALK - A Life of Adventure : Friends of the Library Talk More Information
Cyril, was a journalist on The West Australian for 36 years, 25 of them as crime reporter.

He has covered assignments in Libya's Sahara Desert, Afghanistan, New Guinea, Central Borneo, Nepal and Japan to name but a few.

He searched for and found a lost tribe of Penans in Borneo; walked the Kokoda Trail; traced the "poppy trail" through the "Golden Triangle"; got into Kabul only days before tribal warfare broke out and was on assignment in Hiroshima during that city's 50th anniversary of the atomic bomb attack.

Since leaving The West Australian 26 years ago, he has written 21 books, and has just published his autobiography, “Chameleon – Reporter at Large.”

RSVP: Kathryn Maingard – kathryn.maingard@uwa.edu.au or 08 6488 2356 https://www.eventbrite.com/e/a-life-of-adventure-by-cyril-ayris-tickets-48398997705

Members: Free, Guests: $5 donation
Wednesday 15
18:00 - EVENT - Going International: The International Student on Campus : Panel presentation covering the international student experience from the 60's & 80's and today Website | More Information
This panel presentation provides insight into the experiences of 3 UWA overseas students. The first panelist was a Colombo Plan student from Malaysia in the 1960s. The second was from Romania and studied at UWA in the 1980s. The third panelist is a New Columbo Plan Scholar and has recently returned from China.
Thursday 16
16:00 - SEMINAR - Archaeology Seminar : Collecting the West: The Captain Matthew McVicker-Smyth Collection More Information
‘Collecting the West’ is an ARC funded research project that looks at what’s been collected from Western Australia with a particular focus on collecting practices. This focus enables exploration of the role of collections in identity formation, place making and the production of knowledge. The project’s time span, which reaches as far back as the 1600s and as recently as the present, also locates these collecting practices with the contexts of imperialism, colonialism and the development of State based identities as well as across disciplinary divides. In this paper, we will talk about the discovery of five photographs in 2018 in the State Library of Western Australia which led to the discovery of a forgotten private museum housing the collection of Captain Matthew McVicker-Smyth in early 20th century Perth. Captain Smyth was responsible for the selling of Nobel explosives used by agriculture and the mining industry. The museum contained mineral specimens in cases alongside extensive, aesthetically organised displays of Australian Aboriginal artifacts, amidst a wide variety of ornaments and decorative paintings. The museum reflects a moment in the history of colonialism that reminds us today of forms of dispossession, of how Aboriginal people were categorised in Australia by Western worldviews, and the ways that collectors operated. The research brings back into existence a significant Western Australian museum and opens up a new discussion of how such private collections came into existence and what their legacy might be today.

18:00 - PUBLIC TALK - Water for Chocolate - becoming a food and water literate consumer Website | More Information
An 'All at Sea' public lecture by Professor Anas Ghadouani, Head, Aquatic Ecology and Ecosystems Studies and Programme Chair, Environmental Engineering, The University of Western Australia.

Do you think you’re water literate? More than 80% of Australians know little about the most important thing keeping them alive. Where do you think you use the most water? Washing? Flushing? Watering the garden? Wrong – and Professor Anas Ghadouani, a passionate and self-confessed water geek, has some surprising news for you. But if you love chocolate he has some not-so-great news too… Anas is passionate about all aspects of water engineering and management. With more than 20 years of experience, which took has taken him all over the world while researching water in a wide and diverse range of environments, Anas has developed a unique, integrated and solution-focused approach for the study of water issues. In this public lecture Anas will discuss ways to reduce your water footprint and close the loop on the water cycle at a local level.

All at Sea: Restoration and Recovery Series- Our oceans and coasts provide us with food, energy, livelihoods, cultural and recreational opportunities, yet they are coming under increasing pressure.

This UWA Institute of Advanced Studies - UWA Oceans Institute Lecture Series explores the wonders of our seas, the challenges they face and how research at UWA- in a diverse range of fields including marine science, ocean engineering, health, humanities and social sciences- are contributing to ensure sustainability.

18:00 - EVENT - The ‘Civitas Pia’ of Pope Pius IV (1561-1565) Website | More Information
Permittitur tamen - It’s Ok to Grow Artichokes There. The ‘Civitas Pia’ of Pope Pius IV (1561-1565)

A public lecture by Roger Vella Bonavita, Honorary Senior Research Fellow, The University of Western Australia

The Medici Pope Pius IV (1559-1565) built the suburb now called Borgo Pio (originally named Civitas Pia) and the third enceinte of Castel S. Angelo, also completing the enceinte around the Vatican (unfinished since 1532). He also planned to replace Aurelian’s ancient walls (18 kilometres long) around Rome with gunpowder fortifications.

Capitano Francesco Laparelli da Cortona, a brilliant but obscure Tuscan engineer, was put in charge of these projects by his patron and friend Gabrio Serbelloni; a nephew of Pius IV, governor of Rome, and superintendent of the fortifications in the papal states who was himself a distinguished soldier and military engineer. The role of the pope himself, even in technical discussions, is important too. These projects must be seen in the context of the crying need for up to date defences to enable the papacy to maintain its independence against pressures from Spain (and France).

This illustrated public lecture will highlight the fascinating story of the preparation of the new urban area: which involved levelling the site, demolishing the ninth century church of S. Maria Traspontina and its adjacent Carmelite monastery besides laying out the streets, sewers, water supply and civic buildings and finally the building regulations promulgated by Pius IV for his Civitas Pia in the Bull Romanorum decet Pontificem (August 1565), which for very good reasons specifically permitted the cultivation of artichokes outside the walls of the new city.

Pius sent Laparelli to Malta in November 1565 to assist the Order of St John after it survived a four month siege by the Ottoman Turks. There he designed and built a new fortified capital called Valletta.

19:00 - PERFORMANCE - UWA Music presents: Keyed Up! Alex Raineri Website | More Information
“As a voyager of the keys, Raineri is courageous. He doesn’t shy away from risk in his drive towards dramatic moments.” Limelight Magazine, 2018

Pianist Alex Raineri is a sought-after recitalist, concerto soloist and chamber musician. He joins us at UWA as a Royal Over-Seas League Artist in Residence for a week of workshops, masterclasses and performances.

In this his solo recital, he presents a program of challenging and varied works for piano including a new work by UWA faculty member James Ledger.

Program

Johann Sebastian Bach / Sergei Rachmaninoff - Prelude in E from Violin | Partita #3, BWV 1006 | Chris Dench - flex for AR (2017) | Ludwig van Beethoven - Sonata No. 8 in C minor, Op. 13 ‘Pathetique’ | Maurice Ravel - Pavane Pour Une Infante Defunte | James Ledger - Intended Inventions (2017)

Tickets: Standard $25 | Concessions $20 | Friends of UWA Music $18 | School students attend for FREE (email concerts@uwa.edu.au)
Friday 17
11:00 - SEMINAR - Asian Studies Seminar : Kishi Nobusuke, Moral Re-armament, and Asian Regionalism, 1945-1962 More Information
The origins of political conservatism in Japan are mired in Occupation history, with scholars emphasizing its emergence as a postwar development determined by the alliance between Washington and Japanese elites. This paper re-examines Japanese conservatism as a transwar and transnational project. It focuses on the involvement of Prime Minister Kishi Nobusuke (1896-1987) in the Moral Re- Armament movement (MRA), an international religious organization that caught the attention of politicians, industrialists, and union leaders around the world in the 1940s and 1950s. It shows that MRA helped Japanese elites such as Kishi to reformulate prewar notions of Asian regionalism into Cold War internationalism— what I call the conservative imaginary. In so doing, the paper sheds new light on the negotiated transition from prewar fascism and imperialism to postwar democracy, and helps to explain the political culture of important sections of the Japanese ruling classes up to the present.

11:00 - SEMINAR - Linguistics Seminar : Working with communities on language revitalisation: Some Australian experiences More Information
In this seminar I will discuss issues and challenges around the concepts of language reclamation and language revitalization, especially their relationship to language documentation and description. Discussion will draw on current work with the Dieri Aboriginal Corporation (South Australia) and Yinggarda and Bayungu communities in Carnarvon (Western Australia).

13:00 - PERFORMANCE - UWA Music presents: Free Lunchtime Concert: Alex Raineri & UWA Woodwinds More Information
Be transported from the everyday by our free lunchtime concert series, featuring the best musical talent from within the UWA Conservatorium of Music and around the country.

This week we welcome pianist Alex Raineri, a sought-after recitalist, concerto soloist and chamber musician. He joins us at UWA as Royal Over-Sea League Visiting Artist and has spent the week working closely with UWA Wind Students culminating in this free lunchtime perfromance.

Entry is free - no bookings required

14:30 - SEMINAR - Anthropology and Sociology Seminar : Extraplanetary Effect : Humans, Technologies and Environments beyond Earth More Information
The momentum of technological progress has been steadily reaching outside the planet. Grounded in media infrastructure and practices, our conquest of outer space has been absorbing its inhuman expanses into human mores, entangling them into the circuits of capital, knowledge, ideas and affects and rendering them into a site in which our ‘earthly’ processes of production and consumption, extraction and destruction can propagate and multiply. This paper explores the ways in which the presence and operations of media apparatus beyond the globe forge new relationships between humans, technologies and their environments, reconfiguring the material and social ambits of the arena of life. I consider some of the key trajectories of these ‘extraplanetary’ effects, suggesting that their inflection upon the human media condition tempers the unfolding of our world-making affinities on and off the earth.

15:00 - EVENT - Save the Children UWA Book Sale : Join us in Winthrop Hall for the University Branch 2018 Book Sale, raising money for Save the Children. Website | More Information
A huge number of quality donated books in popular and specialist categories; plus CDs, DVDs, LPs and sheet music all at bargain prices!

Friday 17 August 3-9pm / Saturday 18 August 8-5pm / Sunday 19 August 9-6pm / Monday 20 August 9-6pm / Tuesday 21 August 9-7pm / Wednesday 22 August 9-3pm

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