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Today's date is Friday, October 19, 2018
Events for the public
 July 2018
Tuesday 17
18:00 - PUBLIC TALK - The Nameless Artist in the Theatre of Memory: the challenges of writing on the artworking of Charlotte Salomon (1917-1943) Website | More Information
A public lecture by Griselda Pollock, Professor of Social and Critical Histories of Art and Director of the Centre for Cultural Analysis, Theory and History (CentreCATH), University of Leeds.

It took Griselda Pollock sixteen years to complete the monograph on an artist whose single monumental art work - Life? or Theatre? - comprising 784 paintings and 320 transparent overlays, using image, text and music was created in one year in 1941-42, before being placed in hiding in 1943. First exhibited in 1961, this work is still finding its place in the histories of modern art. Where can we situate a single work by an artist exiled from her own country and living under the threat of effacement from life itself? Why did she undertake this project? How has it been interpreted in ways that further exile it from being considered art historically? What resources are needed to makes its project and its work legible to us now?

Professor Pollock first encountered this work in 1994. Some elements of it were exhibited in Perth in 1997 as part of the benchmark feminist exhibition Inside the Visible curated by Catherine de Zegher. Why has writing this book taken so long? What challenges had to be met theoretically and art historically before she could resolve, in however preliminary a fashion, the issues posed by a single work created in one year in the darkest of European fascism by an artist who was murdered by her own government at the age of twenty-six and who created an unprecedented artwork as grand in scope and as deep in psychological penentration as a Thomas Mann novel, as edgy and sardonic as a Brechtian operatta, and as affecting and sonorous as an opera by Gluck?

This lecture will explore the challenges posed to art hstory by the artworking of Charlotte Salomon and reflect on the ethics of writing on this work and on journey to its completion.
Wednesday 18
18:00 - WORKSHOP - WINTERarts: 'Uke' Can Do It Website | More Information
A fun introductory session to the ukulele.

We’ll cover all the basics from the correct way to hold your ‘uke’, to tuning, basic chords and strumming patterns, learning several songs along the way. This fun introductory session will have you rocking out to Vance Joy, Green Day and The Beatles on your ukulele in no time.

Participants can enjoy a glass of wine, and cheese and biscuits will be provided, so why not grab a group of friends and make a night of it!

Suitable for ages 18+

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UWA WINTERarts 2018 2 - 31 July Escape the winter gloom and experience the best in art, literature, music and ideas during the 2018 UWA WINTERarts season. There are exhibitions, concerts, literary events, skills workshops, tours and a dedicated children’s program for the school holidays.

Find an event for you at culturalprecinct.uwa.edu.au/winterarts
Thursday 19
8:30 - SEMINAR - Social Impact Summit 2018 : Bringing together aspiring and experienced leaders of social change and innovation, this 2-day Summit is designed to inspire and empower. It moves far beyond just talking – it is a carefully designed journey for learning and co-creating our future together. Website | More Information
We believe facilitating connection, building capacity, and empowering others to make meaningful contributions are all key ingredients for solving today’s greatest challenges and creating a future where wellbeing is experienced across all of society. This is what the Summit is all about.

We explore solutions to the deep causes of complex problems, rather than just the symptoms. The latest knowledge generated from research, practice, and lived experience will be surfaced on the first day, before moving into practical case studies and a mass workshop for prototyping our future on the second day.

What is the aim? To achieve societal wellbeing by designing equitable futures, sustainable futures, and healthy futures for all.

Who is it for?

Aspiring and experienced leaders of social change and innovation from social purpose and community organisations, government, academia, and business Future thinkers Intrapreneurs Collaborators Learners, curious about concepts such as social innovation, co-design, systems thinking, social enterprise, and measuring impact Registrations

You can buy your 2-day pass from Tuesday 5 June. Get in before 22 June 2018 to access Early Bird discounts. Prices start at $99.

8:30 - CONFERENCE - Social Impact Summit : A 2-day event for aspiring and emerging leaders of social innovation. The main event of the Social Impact Festival. Website | More Information
Bringing together aspiring and experienced leaders of social change and innovation, this 2-day Summit is designed to inspire and empower. It moves far beyond just talking - it is a carefully designed journey for learning and co-creating our future together.

We believe facilitating connection, building capacity, and empowering others to make meaningful contributions are all key ingredients for solving today’s greatest challenges and creating a future where wellbeing is experienced across all of society. This is what the Summit is all about.

We explore solutions to the deep causes of complex problems, rather than just the symptoms. The latest knowledge generated from research, practice, and lived experience will be surfaced on the first day, before moving into practical case studies and a mass workshop for prototyping our future on the second day.

What is the aim? To achieve societal wellbeing by designing equitable futures, sustainable futures, and healthy futures for all.

See program at https://drive.google.com/open?id=17rUhT0dg1zu4l9CGA5zOTPKb8VlmOWAX

The Social Impact Summit and Social Impact Festival are presented by Centre for Social Impact UWA. Visit https://socialimpactfestival.org/ for more
Friday 20
11:00 - EVENT - Afghanistan and Regional Security Architecture in the Heart of Asia More Information
By Dr. Nasir A. Andisha, Deputy Foreign Minister of the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan

In this seminar Dr Andisha focuses on the security environment in the Asian region with a special focus on the current situation in Afghanistan.

About the speaker:

Prior to his appointment as the Deputy Foreign Minister for Management and Resources, Dr. Nasir Andisha was the Ambassador of the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan to the Commonwealth of Australia, New Zealand and the Republic of Fiji. (2011-2015). Upont his appointment on 2011, aged 32, Dr. Andisha was the youngest Ambassador at Afghanistan’s Foreign Service. Between 2009-2011, Andisha served as the Director General of the Fifth Political Division (US, Canada, Australia and New Zealand) and from 2006 to 2007 he was the Director of Multilateral Economic Relations and International Financial Institutions.

Dr. Andisha has also worked at the Energy Charter Secretariat in Brussels as a consultant and in 2008 he briefly served at the Permanent Mission of Afghanistan at the U.N. Headquarters in New York City. Before joining the Foreign Service, Ambassador Andisha worked with the International Committee of Red Cross as a field officer. He also taught International Relations and Principles of Economics at Institute of Diplomacy of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Afghanistan and Al Beroni University in Afghanistan.
Sunday 22
3:00 - FREE LECTURE - Free GAMSAT Lecture For UWA students : Learn the most effective tips and strategies for GAMSAT success Website | More Information
We're holding a free lecture to teach students everything they need to know to prepare for all three sections of the GAMSAT. We will cover the most effective proven tips and strategies.

Register Here - https://events.genndi.com/register/169105139238461790/9435750835
Tuesday 24
9:00 - SEMINAR - WA Migration and Mobilities Update: Modern Slavery and Human Trafficking : A conference bringing together policy makers, academics, industry and community to discuss the latest on modern slavery and human trafficking. More Information
The critically important and challenging subject of ‘Modern Slavery and Migration’ is the focus of this year’s WA Migration and Mobilities Update, an issue of increasing relevance in Australia to Government and key community interests. This fourth annual WA Migration and Mobilities Update provides a forum for debate and discussion about this issue. The programme, organised by the Migration, Mobilities and Belonging (MMoB) research group at UWA with the support of an expanded Steering Committee, reflects key stakeholder voices in this area. The key aim of this Update is to extend our understanding of the specific policy issues and experiences related to migration, modern slavery and forced labour, and to promote and strengthen links between the university, government, nongovernment and community sectors. We actively support rigorous dialogue and exchange about policy and service delivery, and link high-quality research to the debate. To achieve this aim, this year’s program features two panels led by experts – Professor Jennifer Burn and Associate Professor Marie Segrave, whose presentations will provide an update on the latest research on migration and modern slavery. They are supported by panels of the key voices within government, non government and community who are engaged in both policy and service delivery in this field. We are also pleased to offer an additional half day workshop to raise awareness about indicators of modern slavery.
Thursday 26
17:00 - EVENT - TEDxUWASalon: Exposition : TEDxUWA is excited to announce our second event of 2018, focusing on the oohs and aahs of all things art! Website | More Information
TEDxUWA is excited to announce that we’ll be hosting our second major event of 2018 titled TEDxUWASalon: Exposition on Thursday, 26th of July from 5:00 PM to 8:00 PM!

In celebration of the City of Perth #WINTERarts, the goal of TEDxUWASalon: Exposition is to share and showcase innovation, creativity and insight into the world of art!

You can purchase your tickets now and come along to the Lawrence Wilson Art Gallery at UWA to see our line-up of amazing and unique speakers and workshop leaders!

Find our event on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/events/2062243157350460/

-- ABOUT TEDxUWA:

In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TED Talks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized (Subject to certain rules and regulations).

We seek to find and share ideas from around the world and closer to home with the UWA community. We are students from the University of Western Australia , we are TEDxUWA.

18:00 - PUBLIC TALK - Belonging and Displacement: experiences of people seeking asylum in Australia Website | More Information
A public panel presented by the Limina 13th Annual Conference and the UWA Institute of Advanced Studies.

There are 65.6 million people in the world displaced by war, poverty, and environmental disaster, who have been forced to give up their homes in search of safety and hope for themselves and their families (UNHCR Figures 2016). Of these, 27,626 were accepted as refugees in Australia in 2016, to begin their new life in rural and urban communities. How do you foster a sense of home in another country when you may be faced with trauma, cultural barriers, bureaucratic insecurity, and a political discourse of distrust?

In this panel as part of the 2018 Limina Conference – Home: Belonging and Displacement, we invite you to hear from three speakers who will share their insight, knowledge, and ideas about what it means to work for and create a new home in Australia. The panel will draw from their perspectives as community leaders, researchers, and individuals with lived experiences as refugees.

Facilitator: Fadzi Whande is the Inclusion and Diversity Adviser for The University of Western Australia. She is a Global Diversity and Inclusion Strategist and award winning Social Justice Advocate.

Panellists:

Sara Shengeb recently graduated from UWA with Bachelor of Science. She works part time for the Youth Affairs Council of Western Australia (YACWA). Currently she serves as a Ministerial Advisor to the Hon. Paul Papalia (Minister for Citizenship and Multicultural Interests). At YACWA she coordinates two major programmes, Catalyst Youth Summit and ShoutOut. Sara continues to work for young people of WA which led her to be recognized as a finalist for the Australian Young People’s Human Right Medal in 2016, WA Young Achiever Award 2018 finalist and she was named Young Citizen of the year 2017 by her local government.

Bella Ndayikeze grew up in a refugee camp in Tanzania, with her mother working for UNHCR and father working as a teacher. She lived in the refugee camp for seven years before her family was granted a humanitarian visa to Australia. They arrived in 2005. It was a difficult transition, compounded when her family was torn apart by domestic violence and her mother was left to raise five children. In 2009 Bella began with the Edmund Rice Centre’s Youth sports program and was invited to be a youth leader in 2010. In 2011 she became the first black African female AFL coach in Australia, as the assistant coach of the Edmund Rice Lions, and also began a traineeship at the WA Football Commission in 2012. In 2014 she became co-ordinator of the Edmund Rice Lions team and debuted as an AFL player with West Perth Football Club. In that same year she also coordinated the Edmund Rice Youth leadership and Arts Program. In 2016 she launched her business Ignite Creative Media, joined the Global Shapers team in Perth and coached at the Female AFL Diversity Championships. In 2017 she was employed by the Federal Member for Cowan and became a member of the first ever Youth Ministerial Advisory Council.

Associate Professor Caroline Fleay teaches human rights and conducts research into the experiences of people seeking asylum in Australia at the Centre for Human Rights Education. She has been a regular visitor to some of WA’s sites of immigration detention and written extensively about the impacts on people seeking asylum of indefinite detention and being released into the community with minimal supports. Caroline has also been involved with a range of community groups and human rights campaigns over the past three decades. In 2011 she was awarded the Amnesty International Australia (WA) June Fassina Award for her contributions to human rights activism, and in 2017 she was a finalist for the United Nations Association of Australia Award for the Promotion of Human Rights. Caroline is currently a Board Member of the Refugee Council of Australia and continues to liaise with WA, national and regional refugee support organisations and activists to campaign on the rights of people seeking asylum.
Saturday 28
13:00 - WORKSHOP - UWA Music presents: Keyed Up! Day of Piano Website | More Information
At the UWA Conservatorium of Music, we know that performance enhances your brain, your social skills and helps you reach your full potential.

We also know that exams and auditions can be a daunting experience for young musicians!

Join us for the annual Keyed Up! Day of Piano where you can learn tips and tricks of piano performance from some of Perth’s most experienced teachers and examiners. Why not ensure that every performance you give is one that you are proud of, whether that be for your University or School assessment, WACE practical or AMEB or other grade exams!

The skills that you learn at the Keyed Up! Day of Piano will give you the confidence to excel in all your performance endeavours!

Led by UWA Head of Keyboard and Performance Studies, Graeme Gilling and supported by Perth’s finest pianists, teachers and performance specialists and ideally timed for those students undertaking ATAR Music and AMEB or other grade exams the Keyed Up! Day of Piano is an event not to be missed!

Register to perform and receive feedback from one of our expert panel in an informal workshop setting or just come along and observe students at your own level.

You’ll also have the opportunity to:

- Hear performances by UWA Conservatorium of Music students - Explore the Conservatorium’s Historical Instrument collection with a guided session led by Dr Cecilia Sun - Discover the range of AMEB piano options with Valerie Lang

 August 2018
Thursday 02
18:00 - PUBLIC TALK - Finding our Place in the Universe : The 2018 George Seddon Memorial Lecture by Professor David Blair Website | More Information
The 2018 George Seddon Memorial Lecture by David Blair, Emeritus Professor, ARC Centre of Excellence for Gravitational Wave Discovery.

Over less than two human lifetimes, discoveries in physics transformed the world and our sense of place in the universe. We harnessed electromagnetic waves, thereby shrinking our planet to a village; an infinitesimal speck in a vast and inflating universe. After a long struggle, we learnt how to detect waves of space, gravitational waves, which allow us to hear the universe, thereby changing our sense of the universe once again. Each wave of discovery re-emphasises our transient and improbable existence in an equally transient universe. Our treasure, which is our life and our planet, grows in value as each successive discovery uncovers more and more threads on which our existence depends.

Gravitational science has linked Western Australia to the world and to the whole universe. Einstein’s revolutionary theory of gravity was created while Western Australians were fighting in the first world war. In 1920 while Western Australia was still mourning those killed and wounded, Professor Alexander Ross, Foundation Professor of Physics at UWA campaigned for an international expedition to test Einstein’s extraordinary new theory during an eclipse of the Sun, best seen at Wallal Downs in the Kimberley. Two years later under instructions from Prime Minister Billy Hughes, a Trans Australian steam train carried a team of US astronomers and huge telescopes through Kalgoorlie and Guildford, en route to Wallal Downs. They provided the first indisputable proof of Einstein’s prediction that space is warped by matter.

On 15th September 2015, a vast explosion of gravitational waves was detected by an International team that included more than 20 West Australians. They shared in the world’s richest science prize. The gold that enriched Western Australia was itself a mystery: where is gold created? In 2017 the same team heard a long drawn out siren sound of rippling space - the signature of colliding neutron stars. In their final crash, they slung out blobs of neutrons that exploded like a vast atomic bomb. The Zadko telescope at UWA’s Gingin Centre and many other telescopes observed this explosion and the tell-tale signature of gold.

The annual George Seddon Lecture is sponsored by the UWA Institute of Advanced Studies and UWA’s Friends of the Grounds.
Friday 03
11:00 - SEMINAR - Asian Studies Seminar : Craft Production and Transmission of Craftsmanship in China More Information
Exploring the evolution of artefacts and related behaviours (e.g., artefact production) spatio-temporally is a long-standing issue for both archaeologists and cultural historians. In the modern world, the survival of traditional craftsmanship and corresponding craft production are significantly challenged by urbanization, industrialization, and globalization. Examining traditional contexts of change allows a comparison of past and present transformations in craftsmanship. It helps reveal change at the social, cultural, economic, and ideological levels, and further helps our understanding of the significance of contemporary developments and changes in craft manufacturing. This discussion foregrounds my thesis, which aims to identify how Chinese craft production is changing and whether this poses a threat to any aspect of Chinese intangible cultural heritage. The presentation is based on a completed historical review of the craft production and transmission of craftsmanship in traditional China (from prehistory to 1959). It will discuss production processes of two crafts (porcelain and textile) in traditional China based on a structural Marxist model of society. It will examine how in different periods craftsmanship was transmitted, in which mode, and what affected the craftsmanship transmission.

13:00 - PERFORMANCE - UWA Music presents: Free Lunchtime Concert | Alan Lourens (Euphonium) More Information
Be transported from the everyday by our free lunchtime concert series, featuring the best musical talent from within the UWA Conservatorium of Music and around the country.

The lunchtime concert series resumes this week with a special performance by Head of the Conservatorium, Professor Alan Lourens. Alan will perform some virtuosic works for Euphonium accompanied by Gaby Gunders on piano.

PROGRAM

'Beautiful Colorado' - Joseph De Luca

'Zanette' - Percy Code

'A Cold Mist Over the Cypress Tree' for unaccompanied Euphonium - Philip Wilby

'Variations on a Neapolitan Song' - Herman Bellstedt

Entry is free - no bookings required

14:30 - SEMINAR - Anthropology and Sociology Seminar : Queer Mobilities: Social Normativities, Narratives of Geographic and Social Mobility and LGBTQ youth identity More Information
Social, cultural and archival knowledge frameworks have historically made sense of sexually-diverse youth through a concept of mobility in order to achieve community belonging. Specifically, the conceptual stories of queer youth coming out, transitions to adulthood, social engagement and identity stability are stories marked by narratives of movement from rural to urban areas, from small town to larger town and from mid-size city to large city as a so-called ‘gay mecca’. Although the story of “queer youth mobility into adulthoods of belonging” continues to be circulated in popular culture, personal accounts of coming out shared online and in self-help guidance and community-sponsored suicide prevention sites such as the It Gets Better videos, recent empirical work reveals some of the ways in which young people have a more complex, nuanced understanding of mobility, migration, rural/urban relations and expectations related to minority community. This paper examines a range of instances of queer youth mobility related in participant interviews and focus groups undertaken for the ARC Discovery Queer Generations project. Examining two generations (those born in the 1970s and those in the 1990s) from three small Australian towns and three Australian state capital cities, the veracity of the message of queer youth mobility is interrogated. The paper will discuss some of the ways in which young people think about mobility and belonging, and the relationship between geographic mobility and social mobility.
Tuesday 07
17:00 - FREE LECTURE - Free Presentation : Secretary of the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade, Ms Frances Adamson on The Indo-Pacific: A Western Australian Perspective Website | More Information
The Perth USAsia Centre is honoured to host Ms Frances Adamson, Secretary of the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade for a public presentation on ‘The Indo-Pacific: A WA Perspective'. The Indo-Pacific region is a central focus of the 2017 Foreign Policy White Paper. The White Paper recognised Australia’s shifting regional landscape, and identified the promotion of an open, inclusive and prosperous Indo-Pacific region as critical for both Australia’s and the region’s security and prosperity. Due to its unique position on the Indian Ocean, and as a commercial gateway for Australia to the region, Western Australia has a significant role to play in the Indo-Pacific. This event provides the opportunity to gain insight into the role of Western Australia can play in Australia’s foreign policy approach to the Indo-Pacific region. We look forward to welcoming you at this exclusive event.
Wednesday 08
18:00 - PUBLIC TALK - Three Kinds of Clay, Three Kinds of Antiquity? : The 2018 Tom Stannage Memorial Lecture Website | More Information
The 2018 Tom Stannage Memorial Lecture by Ann McGrath AM, the Kathleen Fitzpatrick ARC Laureate Fellow and Distinguished Professor, School of History, Australian National University

In this memorial lecture, Professor McGrath will focus upon the story of how ‘Terra Australis’ or ‘Sydneia’ - Linnaean classifications for Sydney’s ‘primitive earth’ – became an agent in the importation of Anglo-Hellenic antiquity. What might such clay stories, replete with alluring female figures, reveal about plans to transform a strange earth? How could a fantastically storied antiquity, with it super-corporeal characters, co-exist with the Enlightenment’s fascination with science? Do Indigenous songlines provides clues? And how might such questions relate to the more recent articulations of deep human pasts associated with ancient places like Lake Mungo and the many sites currently being researched in Western Australia?

The 2018 Tom Stannage Memorial Lecture - This memorial lecture commemorates the exceptional contribution made by Professor Tom Stannage (1944-2012) to the Western Australian community. Professor Stannage was a prominent Australian historian who worked hard to foster a wider understanding of Western Australian history and heritage. He is remembered as an inspiring teacher and a passionate advocate for the study of history.
Thursday 09
18:00 - TALK - Just Not Cricket. Aspects of the ball tampering saga Website | More Information
A panel discussion presented by the UWA School of Human Sciences (Exercise and Sport Science) and the UWA Institute of Advanced Studies.

Why Tamper? Understanding the aerodynamics of a cricket ball - Professor Andrew Cresswell, Head, School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences and Professor of Biomechanics/Neurophysiology at The University of Queensland and 2018 UWA Institute of Advanced Studies Visiting Fellow.

Professor Cresswell will present an overview of how a cricket ball behaves in flight. Particular focus will be on the material properties and characteristics of the ball. This will lead to a description of the aerodynamics of a stationary and rotating cricket ball. The aerodynamic effects of the ball’s surface properties and speed will be discussed.

The Law: caught and bowled - Dr Tony Buti, Member for Armadale, WA State Parliament and Honorary Fellow, Law School, The University of Western Australia.

In this talk Dr Buti will provide a commentary on the law of cricket and the process leading to the sanctions imposed on Steve Smith, David Warner and Cameron Bancroft, then move on to discussing issues of sporting contracts, sports tribunals and behavioural misconduct by athletes.

Caught out: a perspective on ethical behaviour in sport - Associate Professor Sandy Gordon, The University of Western Australia, Registered Sport Psychologist.

Dr Gordon will present a critical perspective on the topic, which explains behaviour in professional sport from a rarely considered ideological viewpoint, and comment on social psychological factors such as apparent misuse of power, group think and risky shift phenomena. Suggestions for sport organisations on value-proofing will be offered and also his personal opinion on the ‘character-building and sport’ relationship.

18:00 - PUBLIC TALK - Sleep, Body Clocks and Health: biology to new therapeutics Website | More Information
A public lecture by Russell Foster, Professor of Circadian Neuroscience, Senior Fellow Brasenose College, University of Oxford and 2018 UWA Institute of Advanced Studies Visiting Fellow.

Our internal 24 hour biological clock (circadian clock) and daily sleep processes interact to play an essential, yet poorly recognised, role in our lives. Sleep is not just the simple suspension of physical movement but is an active state when the brain coordinates indispensable activities that define our ability to function whilst awake. The quality of our sleep profoundly influences our cognition, levels of social interaction, empathy, alertness, mood, memory, physical strength, susceptibility to infection, and every other aspect of our waking biology. We are beginning to understand how these critical processes are generated and regulated and many surprising findings have surfaced. For example, until recently it seemed inconceivable to most vision researchers and ophthalmologists that there could be an unrecognised type of light sensor within the eye. Yet we now know that there exists a “3rd class” of photoreceptor in the eye that detects the dawn/dusk cycle and which sets the internal clock to the solar day. The past decade has witnessed remarkable progress in understanding how the brain generates and regulates our daily patterns of sleep and wake. In parallel with this understanding, there has been a growing realisation that our sleep and circadian rhythms cannot be ignored in our headlong dash to generate a 24/7 society. This presentation will review the biology of sleep and circadian rhythms, what happens when these systems go wrong and how recent discoveries are allowing new therapeutics to be developed that will help correct abnormal patterns of sleep and wake.
Friday 10
13:00 - PERFORMANCE - UWA Music presents: Free Lunchtime Concert | Suzanne Wijsman (cello) and Martina Liegat (piano) More Information
Be transported from the everyday by our free lunchtime concert series, featuring the best musical talent from within the UWA Conservatorium of Music and around the country.

This week, Head of Strings Suzanne Wijsman joins forces with Martina Liegat to perform some beautiful works for cello and piano including: Cui 'Deux Morceaux, No. 1', Dvorák 'Silent Woods', and Brahms 'Sonata in E minor'

Entry is free - no bookings required

15:00 - EVENT - MAN v FAT Soccer UWA: Registrations open : Love Soccer? Hate being overweight? You've come to the right place. Website | More Information
UWA Sport and the Psychology of Active, Healthy Living (PAHL) group at The University of Western Australia have partnered with a successful weight-loss program from the United Kingdom (UK) that is designed specifically for men.

MAN v FAT Soccer is for overweight and obese men of any fitness level - every player is in the same situation and wants the same thing. Players join a 6 a-side soccer team and play a match each week, but uniquely, their team's position in the league is decided not just by goals scored on the pitch, but also by weight lost each week.

Realising that most weight loss programs just weren't working for men, the UK founders of the program opened the first MAN v FAT league in January 2016. Just over two years later, there are now over 50 leagues and 4,500 men involved across the UK, and together they've managed to lose over 50,000kg!

If you're a man who has a BMI of 27.5 or higher then you're eligible to join the UWA MAN v FAT league; the first MAN v FAT league anywhere in the world outside the UK! Registration for the first UWA season is just $10; all other costs are being subsidised by UWA Sport.

Registration night: Wednesday 5 September, 6–8pm, UWA Watersports Complex

League dates: Wednesday 12 September–Wednesday 12 December (Wednesday nights, 6-9pm). Weekly competition includes 30-minute soccer match and weigh in before the match.

Location: Riley Oval, University of Western Australia

Registration cost: $10 (Subsidised league)

Registrations open/Registrations close: Monday 6 August/Friday 31 August

Twitter: @manvfatsoccerau Facebook: /manvfatsoccerau

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