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Today's date is Tuesday, July 17, 2018
Events for the public
 June 2018
Tuesday 05
18:00 - PUBLIC TALK - Triumphant Entries during the Italian Wars 1494-1559: celebrating alliances and displaying cultural prowess in the face of unsteady peace Website | More Information
A public lecture by Elizabeth Reid, Postdoctoral Research Fellow, UWA.

Between 1494 and 1559 two major European powers, the French Valois and the Austro-Spanish Habsburg fought a series of wars in a competitive bid to expand their territory into the Italian Peninsula. This period was characterised by ever-shifting allegiances, conspiracies, battles, and peace treaties. Major military victories or new alliances forged, and sealed by marriage, often occasioned a kind of ‘victory-lap’ whereby the triumphant ruler or his bride-prize entered allied territory and were treated to carefully orchestrated festivities. Artists, composers, poets and performers utilised gendered allegories to honour the entering party and to communicate the rich cultural identity of the city itself. Entries were just one level at which the politics of peace played on culturally engrained ideas of masculine strength juxtaposed with feminine vulnerability. This talk will contextualise and discuss key entries in light of this gendered framework. It is supported by a new ARC research project that aims to reconsider the events and cultural output of the Italian Wars through the lens of gender.

This talk is part of the lecture series - Peace and War: Representations in European Art and Literature. The three lectures in this series, offered by UWA academics associated with the UWA Centre for Medieval and Early Modern Studies, focus on representations of war and peace in European art and literature. Collectively, they will examine the contexts and reception of cultural and political practices of war and peace in the medieval and early modern era from the perspectives of emotions history, medievalism, and gender studies. In this way, the series stands to challenge conventional interpretations of European life in wartime from the sixteenth- to the nineteenth century.
Thursday 07
18:00 - PUBLIC TALK - Towards Zero Hunger (SDG2) in Africa Website | More Information
A public lecture by Frans Swanepoel, Research Professor, Centre for Advancement of Scholarship, University of Pretoria, South Africa and 2018 UWA Institute of Advanced Studies Visiting Fellow.

Currently there are 1.3 billion people in Africa; more than five times the population in 1950. By 2050, Africa’s population will double to 2.6 billion, eventually reaching 4.2 billion by the end of the century – just about the entire world population in 1977. Africa is also the world’s most food insecure continent, with relatively low levels of agricultural productivity, low rural incomes, high rates of malnutrition, and a significantly worsening food trade balance. Ironically Africa has sufficient land, water and human resources to be a substantial contributor to the world’s food balance sheet, and to contribute to the growing global demand for both food staples and higher value added food, as well as to energy markets. Agriculture and the food sector also present significant opportunity for employment and wealth creation. This critical role of agriculture in fostering sustained competitiveness and profitability in the sector, in the face of a world economy that is rapidly transformed into a knowledge and network economy is acknowledged both within the scientific community and in Governments at large. Without question, agriculture and capacity strengthening are now back on the development agenda as Africa refocuses towards achieving the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). African agriculture has a number of major strengths, but also faces a significant number of challenges, a set of unique opportunities. Africa has now entered a development stage where some analysts are taking a more positive outlook and narrative as opposed to the traditional ‘Afro-pessimism’ of the last five decades. A new school of thought is emerging, one that recognises that Africa is in a better position to help itself be food secure moving forward – agriculture has started growing, albeit slowly but sustainably over the last decade. However, a number of interesting trends distinguish the economic growth of Africa from other continents. The dominant growth detected here is by small intermediary groups who are responding to rapid urbanisation and the growing ‘middle-class’. Strategies to support growth in sustainable agriculture should thus be responsive to these trends in order to vastly improve food security on the African continent.
Tuesday 12
12:30 - DISTINGUISHED VISITOR - Dean's Distinguished Lecture Series: Emeritus Professor Ian Puddey : Selecting Medical Students: Origins Matter Website | More Information
Join the Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences as Emeritus Professor Ian Puddey discusses "Selecting Medical Students: Origins Matter".

19:30 - TALK - Friends of the UWA Library : Hungary - After the Wall was Over - From Communism to Capitalism More Information
In 1989 the wall between East and West Berlin came down and the Soviet Union collapsed. Hungary as part of the Soviet block had virtually been occupied by Russia for the previous 40 years.

In 1990 Hungary was economically weak and very quickly they saw their best opportunity for economic growth was to seek capital investment from the west. Coca-Cola Amatil Australia identified the potential of building their business and purchased the State-run Coca-Cola Franchises of Hungary & the Czech Republic in 1990. The operations in Hungary were in dire need of modernisation both in manufacturing & marketing. Jim Natt was asked to join a team from Australia with this mission and he worked in Budapest for 6 months in 1991/92. It was a time when Hungarians for the first time could buy products they had seen in magazines or movies. They queued for hours at the new Levi jeans store, or Nike trainers or big Macc. Natt was focused in the Human Resources area and involved the recruitment of new marketing teams and making some difficult changes for some employees. Communism had a low unemployment rate but very low productivity from their workers. Most Hungarians had a job but not necessarily a task. The talk is a personal story of Natt’s experiences working with Hungarians adjusting to a new way of life He grew to love the people and is proud to have a very small part in helping the country prosper today.

Jim has been in the soft drink industry all his working life spending 14 years managing the family business (Mackays Aerated Waters) and 28 years with Coca-Cola Perth in Marketing and Human Resources. In 1989 he retired to pursue other goals.

He was involved in some very Interesting projects including a few years on the organising team of the Variety Club Bash – a car rally around Western Australia – and, with David Tunley, helping to manage the York Winter Music Festival and the Terrace Proms.

In 1991 Coke approached him to go to Hungary as part of a group from Coca-Cola Amatil Australia to help grow the business they had just purchased there. Jim joined the team of Australians in Budapest whose mission was to bring the franchise up to western standards of marketing and production. His appointment was for two three month periods in 1991 and 1992 and he will describe his experiences in Hungary at that time and some of the changes that were taking place.

RSVP: Kathryn Maingard – kathryn.maingard@uwa.edu.au or 08 6488 2356 https://www.eventbrite.com/e/friends-of-the-library-hungary-after-the-wall-was-over-from-communism-to-capitalism-tickets-46000112575

Members: Free, Guests: $5 donation
Wednesday 13
18:00 - PUBLIC LECTURE - Finding Ourselves in the World: Emotion, Orientation, Place : A CHE Public Lecture Website | More Information
‘We must above all see that here it is not a matter for psychology, nor even for a psychology undergirded by physiology and biology. It is a matter of the basic modes that constitute Dasein, a matter of the ways man confronts the Da, the openness and concealment of beings, in which he stands’ – Heidegger, Nietzsche I (p.45).

Emotion is central to the life of the subject, but emotion is no mere modification of subjectivity taken on its own. Rather, emotion is an essential part of the structure that opens up the subject to the objective and to the world. In phenomenological terms, emotion is essentially disclosive of the world. Yet in being so, emotion is also tied to felt bodily locatedness – the ‘being-placed’ – of the subject. Emotion thus belongs not to phenomenology alone, but to the essential topology of the human, and as part of that topology, emotion belongs to the externality of things no less than to the internality of the self. On this basis, we can better understand the relation of emotion to the materiality of human life (the material is always ‘felt’ and the ‘felt’ is always materialised), as well as the character of emotion as itself a mode of orientation – a finding of oneself as in the world in a certain way. Only in this latter fashion, in fact, can one find oneself in the world at all.

Jeff Malpas is Distinguished Professor at the University of Tasmania and Visiting Distinguished Professor at La Trobe University. He was founder, and until 2005 Director, of the University of Tasmania’s Centre for Applied Philosophy and Ethics. He is the author or editor of 21 books on topics in philosophy, art, architecture and geography. His work is grounded in post-Kantian thought, especially the hermeneutical and phenomenological traditions, as well as in analytic philosophy of language and mind. He is currently working on topics including the ethics of place, the failing character of governance, the materiality of memory, the topological character of hermeneutics, the place of art, and the relation between place, boundary and surface.

This free public lecture is the opening keynote of the Third International CHE conference, ‘The Future of Emotions: Conversations Without Borders’, at The University of Western Australia, 14–15 June 2018.

This is a free event, but please RSVP (link on website or email emotions@uwa.edu.au)
Thursday 14
9:00 - CONFERENCE - The Future of Emotions: Conversations Without Borders : Third International CHE Conference Website | More Information
Scholarship on the history of emotions is now rich and varied, and informed by multiple disciplinary perspectives from the humanities. This conference celebrates the many achievements of humanities emotions research and looks to new horizons in which it can be applied.

Registration details to be advised. Call for Papers closes 21 February 2018.

9:30 - STAFF EVENT - Unit Design Workshop-14 June 2018 Website | More Information
Facilitated by an experienced Learning Designer, this one-day workshop is a great practical opportunity for new and current teaching staff at UWA to experience the unit design process.You and your colleagues will participate in a number of sequential collaborative tasks which will allow you to explore ideas for student-centred learning as well as map out and plan the face-to-face and online elements for your unit.
Friday 15
18:00 - PUBLIC TALK - China in Conversation: The World Order in Transition - China, the US and Australia Website | More Information
The 21st century has been dubbed the Asian century, as the growth of China’s economic and political influence puts increased pressure on the existing world order. For Australia, an ally of the United States situated in the Indo-Pacific region, these changes could not be more significant.

In recent years China’s rise has sparked debate about how Australia should manage the relationship with its largest trading partner. Tensions between Australia and China have noticeably increased in the first few months of 2018. As Trump and Xi go head to head on the world stage, what will be the effect on Australia China relations, and what role can Australia play in these turbulent times?

Join in the conversation with our experts for what is likely one of the defining issues of our time.

This event is proudly presented by the Confucius Institute of UWA in partnership with Perth USAsia and Australia China Business Council.
Sunday 24
10:00 - EVENT - Perth Upmarket : Perth’s premier quarterly market for original and handcrafted wares. More Information
Perth Upmarket is Perth’s premier quarterly market for original and handcrafted wares. The market brings together over 180 of Perth’s most talented artists, designers, craftsmen and gourmets all under one roof at the University of Western Australia’s Winthrop Hall. Incorporating a dedicated Junior Upmarket and Gourmet section.

Parking and entry are free and the venue is easily accessible. Three ATMs onsite.

Sunday 24 June 2018 10am - 4pm University of Western Australia's Winthrop Hall www.perthupmarket.com.au
Tuesday 26
18:00 - PUBLIC TALK - Babylon, the Bible and the Australian Aborigines: missionary networks and theories of racial origin in the nineteenth century Website | More Information
A public lecture by Hilary Carey, Professor of Imperial & Religious History, University of Bristol; Conjoint Professor of History, University of Newcastle, NSW and 2018 UWA Institute of Advanced Studies Visiting Fellow.

[God] hath made of one blood all nations of men for to dwell on all the face of the earth, and hath determined the times before appointed, and the bounds of their habitation (Acts 17:26. KJV).

Until challenged by Darwinian evolution, Christians believed on excellent biblical authority that ‘all nations of men’ were God’s creation and there could be no fundamental division between them. From this it followed that all the extraordinary cultural diversity exhibited by the peoples of the world disguised an essential unity: they were ‘one blood’. This talk will examine the work of the Scottish schoolteacher Dr John Fraser (1834-1904) who sought to prove that the languages of the Australian Aborigines demonstrated that they were descended from the Dravidian peoples of southern India and were, ultimately, Babylonian in origin. Fraser’s views were published as part of his 1892 edition of the works of the missionary Lancelot Threlkeld (1877-1859) which was prepared as part of the New South Wales contribution to the World’s Columbian exhibition in Chicago in 1893. Fraser was both an able linguist and a skilled editor but those who have encountered the important work of Lancelot Threlkeld and his collaborator Biraban through his edition have found his biblical arguments distracting, if not bizarre.

This lecture will consider John Fraser as a representative of a Calvinist rear guard who sought to use the science of linguistics to defend the literal and scientific value of biblical narratives. Far from being a marginal figure, Fraser was at the centre of an extensive network of missionary linguists seeking to harmonise knowledge of Pacific and Aboriginal languages with scriptural deep history.

 July 2018
Monday 02
9:30 - STAFF EVENT - Unit Design Workshop-2 July 2018 More Information
Facilitated by an experienced Learning Designer, this one-day workshop is a great practical opportunity for new and current teaching staff at UWA to experience the unit design process.

You and your colleagues will participate in a number of sequential collaborative tasks which will allow you to explore ideas for student-centred learning as well as map out and plan the face-to-face and online elements for your unit.
Wednesday 04
15:41 - EVENT - RAID seminar & networking event : Meet like-minded researchers and hear from four leading experts in the field of international agricultural research. More Information
Friday 06
18:30 - FREE LECTURE - UWA Music presents: Distinguished Artist Lecture Series with Milijana Nikolic More Information
UWA and West Australian Opera (WAO) present a series of lecture recitals, talks and masterclasses with internationally recognised directors and artists from WAO’s 2018 season, which will delight audiences with a unique insight into the world of opera.

In our second lecture of 2018, join Serbian-born mezzo-soprano Milijana Nikolic as she discusses preparing for the title role of Carmen in WAO's upcoming production.

Entry is free | please RSVP to concerts@uwa.edu.au

Refreshments served from 630pm | event start 7pm
Saturday 07
11:00 - EVENT - The Good Market at #SIFest18 : Join WA’s community of change-making businesses and consumers for a fun day out with the whole family. Website | More Information
Showcasing WA’s vibrant community of ethically conscious businesses and organisations, The Good Market is the place to explore products and services that do good.

Browse and shop ethical fashion, gifts, food, homewares and eco products, and meet the inspiring change-makers behind these enterprises. Learn more about how you can buy and consume in a more sustainable and conscious way.

The Good Market is a fun-filled day for all the family with kids’ activities, live performances and wholesome food trucks on the beautiful grounds of UWA.

The Good Market is open and free for all to attend – simply come on the day and enjoy!



Stall-holders include:

Postcode Honey, Fair Go Trading, Leo Strange, Kadi Koo, Sophie Silks ...And many more to be announced!
Wednesday 11
9:00 - EVENT - AUSTA Cello Big Day Out Website | More Information
The AUSTA Big Cello Day Out will be held at the UWA Conservatorium of Music.

Activities will include: opportunities for junior, intermediate and advanced students to play and receive feedback from expert teachers, cello ensemble workshops, and the chance for teachers of junior, secondary and tertiary students to observe and participate in discussion forums with guest teachers.

Visiting cellists include Thomas Gregory (UK), David Pereira (ANU) and Alvin Wong (Melbourne), Louise Butler (ACT) among others, will provide expert insights and feedback to participants.

The day will conclude with a master class by WASO soloist and international cellist, Pablo Ferrández.

Registration can be made for individual sessions, combined sessions or the whole day. Special discounts are available for AUSTA National Conference delegates, AUSTA members and students. Attendance at all sessions is free for Australian tertiary music students with current university ID. A catered lunch may be ordered online along with your registration.

Tickets available here: www.trybooking.com/383059
Thursday 12
9:30 - STAFF EVENT - Unit Design Workshop-12 July 2018 More Information
Facilitated by an experienced Learning Designer, this one-day workshop is a great practical opportunity for new and current teaching staff at UWA to experience the unit design process.

You and your colleagues will participate in a number of sequential collaborative tasks which will allow you to explore ideas for student-centred learning as well as map out and plan the face-to-face and online elements for your unit.

10:00 - GUIDED TOUR - Plant the Seed of Knowledge Tour (for ages 8+) : This walking tour is designed for school children (ages 8+) and their families Website | More Information
Hosted by UWA Friends of the Grounds, this walking tour is designed for school children (ages 8+) and their families and will showcase just a small example of what the University has to offer.

Meet our Senior Deputy Vice-Chancellor, Professor Simon Biggs; be amazed at the history of Winthrop Hall; touch a meteorite, have a tour of the Geology museum, purchase rocks that are millions of years old, tour the newly-refurbished Reid Library; hug a tree that is more than 660 years old; see a fascinating science experiment and a host of other extras.

The tour starts under the Great Gate, Winthrop Hall.

16:30 - BOOK LAUNCH - Invitation to The Natural World of the Kimberley book launch : The Natural World of the Kimberley provides an unprecedented view of the Kimberley flora, fauna and landscapes, and the conservation efforts underway to preserve them. Website | More Information
The Western Australian Marine Science Institution is proud to support the launch of the Kimberley Society’s latest publication, The Natural World of the Kimberley.

The publication is the culmination of research results presented at the 2017 Kimberley Symposium including chapters on the WAMSI Kimberley Marine Research Program as well as land-based research conducted across Western Australia’s universities and state government authorities.
Friday 13
11:00 - UWA Research Event - Research Impact Series : Discover how our world-leading researchers are tackling global, national and regional issues to make the world a better place. Website | More Information
Research Impact Series Events:

Cosmos: Journey Through the Universe Thursday. 9 August, 18 October and 8 November 2018

Germaine Greer On Rape: Monday 3 September 2018

Raising the Bar Perth: 10 bars, 10 topics, 1 night only. Tuesday 11 September 2018

Achieving your Research Outcomes: Wednesday 17 - Thursday 18 October 2018
Tuesday 17
18:00 - PUBLIC TALK - The Nameless Artist in the Theatre of Memory: the challenges of writing on the artworking of Charlotte Salomon (1917-1943) Website | More Information
A public lecture by Griselda Pollock, Professor of Social and Critical Histories of Art and Director of the Centre for Cultural Analysis, Theory and History (CentreCATH), University of Leeds.

It took Griselda Pollock sixteen years to complete the monograph on an artist whose single monumental art work - Life? or Theatre? - comprising 784 paintings and 320 transparent overlays, using image, text and music was created in one year in 1941-42, before being placed in hiding in 1943. First exhibited in 1961, this work is still finding its place in the histories of modern art. Where can we situate a single work by an artist exiled from her own country and living under the threat of effacement from life itself? Why did she undertake this project? How has it been interpreted in ways that further exile it from being considered art historically? What resources are needed to makes its project and its work legible to us now?

Professor Pollock first encountered this work in 1994. Some elements of it were exhibited in Perth in 1997 as part of the benchmark feminist exhibition Inside the Visible curated by Catherine de Zegher. Why has writing this book taken so long? What challenges had to be met theoretically and art historically before she could resolve, in however preliminary a fashion, the issues posed by a single work created in one year in the darkest of European fascism by an artist who was murdered by her own government at the age of twenty-six and who created an unprecedented artwork as grand in scope and as deep in psychological penentration as a Thomas Mann novel, as edgy and sardonic as a Brechtian operatta, and as affecting and sonorous as an opera by Gluck?

This lecture will explore the challenges posed to art hstory by the artworking of Charlotte Salomon and reflect on the ethics of writing on this work and on journey to its completion.

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