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Today's date is Monday, May 28, 2018
Events for the public
 May 2018
Tuesday 01
18:00 - PUBLIC TALK - The Collective Power and Potential of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Women and girls: recognising their human rights in achieving gender equity : The 2018 Grace Vaughan Memorial Lecture by June Oscar AO, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Social Justice Commissioner. Website | More Information
In April 2017, June Oscar AO became the first woman to be appointed as the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Social Justice Commissioner at the Australian Human Rights Commission (AHRC). Commissioner Oscar has made the human rights of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women and girls a priority of her term. It has been over thirty years since the Commonwealth Government invested in the landmark Women’s Business Report, which listened and responded to the needs of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women.

This year, 2018, the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet are supporting Commissioner Oscar and her team to build on the legacy of this report. The project called, Wiyi Yani U Thangani, Women’s Voices, will listen to the strengths, challenges and aspirations of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women and girls in engagements across Australia. In her address, Commissioner Oscar highlights the remarkable lived reality of women and girls across the nation. She considers how gender equity will only be achieved when Australia delivers justice to First Nation’s women and girls. She explains how embedding human rights mechanisms in our policy and legislative frameworks will guarantee that we listen and respond to what Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women and girls need and want for a positive and healthy future. Through raising the collective voices of women and girls we can achieve a more just, dynamic and equitable nation.

The annual Grace Vaughan Memorial Lecture commemorates the life and achievements of Grace Vaughan, a social worker, social activist and parliamentarian, who was dedicated to the improvement of life at all levels and had a deep commitment to Australia's participation in the Asian region and to ensuring women's full participation in society. The lecture is presented by the Australian Association of Social Workers, the Institute of Advanced Studies at The University of Western Australia and Department of Communities Western Australia.
Wednesday 02
18:00 - FREE LECTURE - Misconceptions about Women in Islam More Information
The stance of Islam regarding certain issues relating to women has remained a hot subject of debate, especially in the last few centuries. Although Islam does not support the basic tenets of the feminist movement, it must be conceded that this movement has served to create awareness in the educated Muslim women regarding some of the viewpoints that are presented to them by the clergy under the label of Islam. In recent times, the works of Hamid al-Din Farahi (1863-1930), Amin Ahsan Islahi (1904-1997) and Javed Ahmad Ghamidi (b. 1951) have attempted to clarify the stance of the Islamic shari‘ah on various issues. In this talk, an attempt will be made to dispel some very grave misconceptions about women in Islam in the light of their research.

About the speakers

Dr Shehzad Saleem has been under the tutelage of Pakistan’s eminent scholar Javed Ahmad Ghamidi since 1988. He is a Research Fellow and one of the Vice Presidents of Al-Mawrid, a Pakistani institute of Islamic research and education. Dr Saleem holds a PhD in the History of the Qur’an from the University of Wales, UK.

Kaukab Shehzad is a an Associate Fellow at Al-Mawrid. She is a graduate in Philosophy and Psychology and has been a student of Javed Ahmad Ghamidi. DATE: Wednesday, 2 May 2018

TIME: 6:00pm to 7:30pm

VENUE: Economics and Commerce Conference Room, Room 3.73, 3rd floor. Old Economics & Commerce Building (Bldg 351). Location: https://studentvip.com.au/uwa/main/maps/85290

ENTRY: Free. But please RSVP to cmss-ss@uwa.edu.au
Thursday 03
16:00 - SEMINAR - Archaeology Seminar : A Suite of Sweeping Changes in Late Prehistory: an Interdisciplinary-Archaeological Approach to Pastoral Adaptations in Northern Mongolia's Darkhad Depression More Information
Ongoing research in the Darkhad Depression of Huvsgul Province has helped to illuminate the changing settlement patterns, economic strategies, and socio-political developments that took place as the hunter-gatherers of the region began to incorporate pastoralism into their traditional lifeways. While herding is central to Mongolian national identity, culture, history and economy, very little is known about the origins of pastoralism in the region. Utilizing an international, interdisciplinary team, we have approached the research of this transitional period by using both traditional archaeological methods such as survey, ethnoarchaeology and excavation and more cutting edge approaches like NDVI-Drone mapping, paleoethnobotany, paleoclimatology, remote sensing and more. The region appears to continue to practice a flexible, fluid multi-resource economy where both hunting and herding are utilized through time to the present day, making it an ideal location to research hunter-herder interaction. Comparisons with similar survey projects from other regions of Mongolia in different ecological zones have highlighted regional similarities and differences in monument construction, settlement patterns, and risk-reduction strategies. The addition of this project and other recent research programs like it that focus on settlements, domestic spaces and the “landscape approach” have added important new discoveries to the traditional research approaches that have primarily been concerned with the ritual and ceremonial sites of Mongolia.

18:00 - PUBLIC TALK - Ageing and Care in Mediterranean Countries: the case of Italy Website | More Information
A public lecture by Giuliana Costa, Associate Professor of Sociology, Politecnico di Milano, Italy and 2018 Institute of Advanced Studies Visiting Fellow.

A great many of us will be in need of care during our lifetime, mainly when we grow old. It is likely we will have to gather together the resources we already have, as well as look for new ones to support us, particularly the longer we live. Care arrangements depend a great deal on where we live, which services are available to support us if we become ‘dependent’, and how “care systems” function. The majority of research has shown that care remains a family task even in those contexts characterized by generous publicly funded personal services, as in the Nordic European countries. But in the Mediterranean “care regimes”, this task is taken for granted. A kind of “implicit familialism” is in place because of the huge duties assigned to families by policies (or the absence of them) assuming that family members are always capable and available to provide care. In these care regimes formal services are indeed scarce and intervene only residually, in very urgent and complex cases. This approach is embedded in social policies as well in the wider normative framework, for example concerning financial responsibilities towards relatives.

In this presentation, Associate Professor Giuliana Costa will illustrate and discuss the main elements of the Mediterranean care regime focusing on the Italian case: the lack of in-kind services, the existence of unregulated monetary supports for long term care, the centrality of families and the emergence of a ‘private to private’ solution that is peculiar to Italy, and which is attracting care workers from Eastern European countries. As a matter of fact, growing long-term care needs are supported by few existing formal public services and rely heavily on the informal care provided by family members and the help of private assistants, the so-called “badanti” (care-workers). These care workers are mostly migrant women and are filling the existing care gaps within the Italian welfare state. Giuliana will present the dilemmas related to this policy pattern as well as the most recent proposals to overcome it.
Friday 04
9:00 - CONFERENCE - Radicalisation and de-radicalisation: Post-ISIS? : A CMSS Conference More Information
Three years ago, ISIS claimed a cross-border caliphate stretching over vast swathes of north-western Iraq and eastern Syria. Fascinated by its rise, Muslim youths from all corners rapidly joined its cause. After three years of shocking violence, ISIS has faced major setbacks and has been in retreat in those areas it formerly controlled. Many of its fighters have been returning. This conference brings together experts to shed light on the lessons on radicalisation and de-radicalisation in the context of the rise and apparent decline of ISIS and to offer insights into future trends. What would radicalisation and de-radicalisation look like in the future? What are the responses required? These are the questions at the heart of this one-day conference being organised by The Centre for Muslim States and Societies, The University of Western Australia. The conference will be useful for policy makers, law enforcement groups, academia, students and all those interested in countering radicalisation.

TICKETS: Students: $50, Others: $100

Pay at the gate in cash but prior reservation required via cmss-ss@uwa.edu.au. (Costs include morning tea, lunch and afternoon tea)

9:00 - EVENT - Conference on Radicalisation and De-radicalisation: Post-ISIS More Information
Three years ago, ISIS claimed a cross-border caliphate stretching over vast swathes of north-western Iraq and eastern Syria. Fascinated by its rise, Muslim youths from all corners rapidly joined its cause. After three years of shocking violence, ISIS has faced major setbacks and has been in retreat in those areas it formerly controlled. Many of its fighters have been returning. This conference brings together experts to shed light on the lessons on radicalisation and de-radicalisation in the context of the rise and apparent decline of ISIS and to offer insights into future trends. What would radicalisation and de-radicalisation look like in the future? What are the responses required? These are the questions at the heart of this one-day conference being organised by The Centre for Muslim States and Societies, The University of Western Australia. The conference will be useful for policy makers, law enforcement groups, academia, students and all those interested in countering radicalisation.

DATE: Friday, 4 May 2018

TIME: 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM

PLACE: Seminar Room 1, The Uni Club of Western Australia, M800, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley

TICKETS: Students: $50 | Others: $100

Pay at the gate in cash but prior reservation required via cmss-ss@uwa.edu.au. (Costs include morning tea, lunch and afternoon tea)

CONFIRMED SPEAKERS

Professor Amin Saikal, Australian National University | The defeat of the ‘Islamic State’ and its impact on US foreign policy in the Middle East

Profess James Piscatori, Australian National University | The Umma post-ISIS

Professor Samina Yasmeen, The University of Western Australia | JUD, ISIS and Pakistan: future trajectories of radicalisation

Dr Richard Vokes, Associate Professor, University of Western Australia | The shifting contexts of jihadism in Sub-Saharan Africa: a comparison of al-Shabaab and the Allied Democratic Forces

Dr Ian Chalmers, Adjunct Senior Lecturer, The University of Western Australia | How have the jihadists coped with Indonesia's de-radicalisation campaign?

Dr Leila Ben Mcharek, Research Fellow, CMSS, The University of Western Australia | Libya: a case of survival of Daesh

Dr Shehzad Saleem, Research Fellow and Vice President, Al-Mawrid Institute | Understanding ISIS’s ideology and its continued influence

Nava Ghalili, Journalist | Youth empowerment as a means to prevent youth radicalization?

Ridwan, PhD Candidate, The University of Western Australia | Transnational Islam and Threat of Radicalisation in Indonesia

Farooq Yousaf, PhD Candidate, University of Newcastle, New South Wales

11:00 - SEMINAR - Asian Studies Seminar : Reading Hokusai’s Manga in Nineteenth-Century France More Information
This presentation examines the early reception and popularity of Katsushika Hokusai’s Manga in late nineteenth-century Paris. A multi-volume series of diverse illustrations, the Manga arrived in France during a moment of cultural transition, and this talk will examine how the French instrumentalised and interpreted Hokusai’s illustrations to suit radical political and artistic agendas.

14:30 - EVENT - Anthropology and Sociology Seminar : Buying the nation and beyond: discursive dilemmas in debates around cosmopolitan consumption More Information
This paper (a chapter from a recent edited collection on Cosmopolitanism, Markets and Consumption) explores the question of how people articulate (and challenge) the notion of ‘buying national’, and the extent to which they express a preference for cosmopolitan consumption. After an overview of survey data about attitudes to foreign products, it focuses on data from 26 focus groups (n=223) with migrant and non-migrant Australians, employing a discursive dilemmatic analytical approach to ask whether, when justifying their purchasing decisions, people use an ethics of care oriented to co-nationals or demonstrate a more cosmopolitan orientation. With protectionist rhetoric becoming a commonplace in the political arena (Trump, Brexit), how the general population engages with the relationship between the economy, nationalism and cosmopolitanism, is crucial to understanding processes of globalisation. While recognising issues around parochialism, cost, quality, duty to others, working conditions, and the environment, ultimately the bottom line in discussions was an imperative to ‘look after our own’ by buying national. However, there was some evidence of cosmopolitan thinking among a few participants, who saw the focus on supporting the national economy, at the expense of others, as selfish. The paper concludes that the nationalist impulse to protect one’s own is ubiquitous, and that this reinforces the nation-state as the relevant category for an ethics of sharing.

18:00 - EXHIBITION OPENING - Exhibition Opening Night - Season 2 at LWAG Website | More Information
We launch the next season at the Lawrence Wilson Art Gallery with the opening of three new exhibitions.

Stewart Scambler: Fragment presents a new body of work, a striking assembly of large-scale sculptural forms and murals inspired by potter Stewart Scambler's recent journey through the Pilbara and Kimberley.

Modern Australian Landscapes, 1940s-1960s: Works from the University of Western Australia Art Collection.

Authentic Determination: a collaboration between Cruthers Collection of Women's Art and South Australian artist and curator Brigid Noone.

All exhibitions run from 5 May - 18 August 2018.
Saturday 05
10:00 - EVENT - Perth Upmarket : Perth’s premier quarterly market for original and handcrafted wares. Website | More Information
Calling all brides-to-be...

If you’re getting married in Perth, put Wedding Upmarket in your diary now as we will be showcasing more than 50 handpicked local designers to help you create a bespoke celebration.

Western Australia is home to hundreds of creatives, but sometimes the best wedding suppliers are hard to find. Wedding Upmarket is about connecting brides-to-be with local designers to create a truly custom, personalised event.

Wander around our inspirational styled areas and meet Perth’s finest designers and discuss how they can help you transform all of those online inspiration boards into a reality.

Parking and entry are free and the venue is easily accessible.

When: Saturday 5th May 2018 Time: 10am to 3pm Where: The University of Western Australia’s Winthrop Hall Undercroft

For more information head to http://weddingupmarket.com.au/ See you there!
Tuesday 08
18:00 - PUBLIC TALK - Youth in Wartime: medievalist fictions for Victorian children. Website | More Information
A public lecture by Andrew Lynch, Professor of English and Cultural Studies, UWA.

The middle ages acquired a higher cultural prestige in nineteenth-century ideas of English national heritage. Literature exemplifying the spirit of medieval ‘chivalry’ was called on to offer behavioural models to Victorian children, yet there was also a widespread critique of medieval war as marred by mercenary motives, atrocities and civilian suffering. Consciousness of the perceived violence and religious ‘superstition’ of the medieval past in general helped shape writers’ narrative and ideological strategies. With the Middle Ages commonly seen as the childhood of the present, their works focussed a larger debate about war’s place in the course of national history and the development of the English character. The talk will be illustrated by contrasting examples of medievalist fictions about youth growing to maturity in wartime, including Charlotte M. Yonge, The Lances of Lynwood (1855), Charles Kingsley, Hereward the Wake (1866) and Robert Louis Stevenson, The Black Arrow (1888).

This talk is part of the lecture series - Peace and War: Representations in European Art and Literature. The three lectures in this series, offered by UWA academics associated with the UWA Centre for Medieval and Early Modern Studies, focus on representations of war and peace in European art and literature. Collectively, they will examine the contexts and reception of cultural and political practices of war and peace in the medieval and early modern era from the perspectives of emotions history, medievalism, and gender studies. In this way, the series stands to challenge conventional interpretations of European life in wartime from the sixteenth- to the nineteenth century.
Wednesday 09
17:30 - CANCELLED - BOOK LAUNCH - Book Launch and Garden Opening: The New Fortune Theatre : Help celebrate the launch of The New Fortune Theatre and opening of The Shakespeare Garden Website | More Information
Unfortunately this event has been cancelled.

This event has been cancelled due to scheduled works that affect the site.

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UWA Publishing and The Centre for the History of Emotions warmly invite you to the book launch of The New Fortune Theatre: That Vast Open Stage, edited by Ciara Rawnsley and Robert White, and the opening of the Shakespeare Garden.

Built in 1964, the New Fortune Theatre at The University of Western Australia is a unique reconstruction of the Fortune Playhouse built in London in 1600, the year Hamlet was performed at the rival Globe playhouse. This book, richly illustrated with rare archival images, traces its romantic origins, and debates the possibilities it offers for creating strong emotional effects in audiences in such an intimate but imposing venue.

The book will be launched by Professor Susan Broomhall.

At the same event the first stage of a new Shakespeare-inspired theme Garden, featuring flora referred to in the plays and poems, will be opened by Professor Matthew Tonts, Executive Dean of the Faculty of Arts, Business, Law and Education.

Both projects are supported by the Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for the History of Emotions.

Refreshments will be available.

Please RSVP by Friday 4 May.

17:30 - MASTERCLASS - UWA Music presents Converge | Guitar Masterclass with Jonathan Fitzgerald Website | More Information
Join us each week for a delightful musical surprise! From young artist-led concerts to informal musical drinks on the famous grassy knoll, behind-the-scenes workshops, lectures and masterclasses, these free weekly musical experiences will delight all music lovers.

Masterclasses are an important learning opportunity for emerging artists but they also offer students, educators and music lovers not only the opportunity to see some amazing performances, but also to get a unique insight into the process of preparing a performance with advice from expert mentors.

This week Head of the UWA Guitar Studio Dr Jonathan Fitzgerald working with the next generation of young high school guitarists.

Entry is free - no bookings required
Friday 11
13:00 - PERFORMANCE - UWA Music presents Free Lunchtime Concert | The Winthrop Singers and Piñata Percussion Website | More Information
Be transported from the everyday by our free lunchtime concert series, featuring the best musical talent from within the UWA Conservatorium of Music and around the country.

This week, be transported by the divine voices of the Winthrop Singers, supported by special guests Piñata Percussion.

Entry is free - no bookings required

14:30 - SEMINAR - Anthropology and Sociology Seminar : Monsters, dogs, blackfellas, and whitefellas: An ethnographic riddle about seeing and unseeing from central Australia More Information
The main aims of this paper are to (1) familiarise you with some diverse strands of my research, and (2) start a discussion about how they interface. Since 1994, I have been undertaking research with Warlpiri people, in the town of Yuendumu in central Australia. Yuendumu is one of four Warlpiri settlements on the fringes of the Tanami Desert, the Warlpiri homeland, and was set up in 1946 as a government ration station to alleviate Warlpiri suffering due to the ravages of the colonial frontier. Today, between 400-800 highly mobile Warlpiri people reside at Yuendumu, as well as about 100 non-Indigenous (mainstream Australian) service providers. My primary research focus has been on the phenomenology of the everyday, and topics span from sleep, fear, boredom, and death to laughter, neo-colonial relations, the night and the monstrous. This paper is structured as follows: I first sketch the riddle, which arises out of the different ways in which Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal people, respectively see monsters in my fieldsite. This is followed by three different analytical paths, each introduced by a brief ethnographic vignette: the first considers meanings of death, the second Warlpiri-dog relations, and the third unseeing as a social practice. In the conclusion, I transpose my insights to the national level.
Monday 14
8:00 - COURSE - Practical Rock Mechanics in Mining Short Course : This course is designed to develop specific open pit and underground mining geomechanics competencies for mine geologists and engineers so their contribution to mine site geomechanics programmes is enhanced. Website | More Information
This course is designed to develop specific open pit and underground mining geomechanics competencies for mine geologists and engineers so their contribution to mine site geomechanics programmes is enhanced. The course could be of particular benefit to geomechanics personnel with limited practical experience and is applicable to both open pit and underground mining personnel.

Course topics include:

Intact rock strength Discontinuities Rock mass classification Core logging and geotechnical mapping Stress measurements Rock mass failure criteria Data collection strategy Underground geomechanics mine design Open pit geomechanics design Groundwater management Numerical modelling Monitoring underground mines Monitoring open pit mines Stope reconciliation Introduction to probabilistic design
Tuesday 15
12:30 - DISTINGUISHED VISITOR - Dean's Distinguished Lecture Series: UWA Visiting Professor Dame Jill Macleod-Clark : Imagine a different future - is the time up for traditional Health Professional roles? Website | More Information
The Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences welcomes UWA Visiting Professor Prof. Dame Jill Macleod-Clark from the University of Southampton, to present 'Imagine a different future - is the time up for traditional Health Professional roles?' Join us for light refreshments at the conclusion of the presentation.
Wednesday 16
18:00 - PUBLIC TALK - Savonarola and Botticelli: the visionary prophet and the penitent painter Website | More Information
A public lecture by Arvi Wattel, School of Design, The University of Western Australia.

After the French invasion in 1494, the Florentine people revolted against its de facto rulers and exiled the Medici family from Florence. Subsequently, the followers of the Dominican preacher Girolamo Savonarola (called piagnoni: weepers) instituted a theocratic government, taking fierce control over the city, while Savonarola was preaching the end of times and called for a large ‘bonfire of the vanities’ to ‘cleanse’ the city. Savonarola’s disgust of splendour is famous, but what exactly was the impact of his sermons and this theocratic government on the arts? How did artists respond to his attacks on their art and his calls for reform?

This lecture is part of a lecture series: A Window on Italy – The Corsini Collection: Masterpieces from Florence.

The Institute of Advanced Studies is pleased to present a series of lectures to be held in conjunction with the exhibition, A Window on Italy – The Corsini Collection: Masterpieces from Florence, which is being held at the Art Gallery of Western Australia from 24 February – 18 June 2018.

The exhibition is organised by the Galleria Corsini, Florence, Auckland Art Gallery Toi o Tãmaki, the Art Gallery of Western Australia and MondoMostre, Rome.
Thursday 17
8:00 - COURSE - Managing Seismic Risks in Underground Mines Short Course : This course is designed to introduce mine geotechnical engineers to basic mine seismology concepts and their application in mining. Website | More Information
Hard rock mines in deep and high-stress environments often require the use of seismic systems to enable operators to manage seismic risk posed to the workforce, the mining investment and the environment. Seismic data is also used in assessing the rock mass response to mining activities where source parameters are used in the interpretation of rock mass failure mechanisms, the calibration of numerical modelling, and the interpretation of failure mechanics of the rock mass. This course is designed to introduce mine geotechnical engineers to basic mine seismology concepts and their application in mining. Geotechnical engineers who work on medium to high risk seismic mines would benefit most from this course. Course topics include: • Intact rock strength • Spatial seismic analysis • Seismic response • Seismic re-entry • Seismic hazard assessment

16:00 - SEMINAR - Archaeology Seminar : When, why and by whom was the controversial ‘ship motif’ painted at walganha (Walga Rock)? More Information
For nearly 100 years people have wondered who painted a European ship with two masts, a row of gun ports and an apparent funnel at walganha, the most profusely decorated, ceremonially and mythologically significant, pictogram site known in southern Western Australia. Is the ship meant to be VOC Batavia or Zuytdorp, or is it the SS Xantho; they wrecked near Geraldton in 1629, 1712 and 1872, respectively. Does the stylised four-line pattern beneath the ship’s hull represent ‘waves’ or mimic Arabic or Asian ‘writing’? Is the motif simply graffiti, made in the 1890s during the Murchison gold rush? Was the artist a blonde, blue-eyed (part-Dutch?) girl who was killed and buried nearby for desecrating a men’s site? Did Sammy Malan/Hasssan, a ‘Malaysian’ ex-pearl diver, paint the ship after he settled at Walga Soak in about 1917? These questions will be considered in the light of several mutually-corroborative newspaper articles overlooked by previous commentators. They indicate that the ship was probably painted by an Aboriginal man before 1890; when pastoralism was being introduced into the Cue region. While difficult to ‘prove’, definitively, this scenario makes historic sense and has implications for post-colonial cultural collapse in this under-studied region.

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